Water Wednesday: Plenty of Great Catches at KC Area Rivers and Lakes

By Angela Sena

Bass (courtesy MDC)

Bass (courtesy MDC)

Along with catching a great Chiefs or Royals game, you can also get a great catch with the many fishing opportunities in the Kansas City area. I’ve always enjoyed fishing, and have been my husband’s fishing buddy for many years (even before tying the knot – I think that’s how I snagged him). Now, with our little fisherman, we are passing along the fever.

During the summer, you can find us at one of the local boat docks launching at sunrise and fishing till 10 or so, or until hunger pains are too great. However, if the fishing is really good, my best bet is to take a snack. (I can’t seem to tear my husband away at that point!) Later we pull into the driveway as our neighbors are just getting up – and we still have the rest of the day!

MDC boat ramps in KC area

MDC boat ramps in KC area
(click to access interactive map)

In Missouri, where I live, there are many Department of Conservation (MDC) rivers and lakes to fish. These lakes are not as widely known as the larger lakes, but they hold good potential for some great fishing and summer fun and even food. Four Missouri counties in the Kansas City metropolitan area – Platte, Clay, Jackson, and Cass – offer fishing opportunities including shore, boat, lake, pond, and river fishing.

Larger rivers generally are abundant in catfish and carp. Smaller streams usually contain lots of channel catfish, but you can also catch largemouth bass, bluegill, green sunfish, carp, and crappie. Almost all area streams have public access areas. Check the Missouri weekly fishing report for the type of fish in the area and types of lures that work best for the season. I sometimes think lures are for anglers, since the fish pay no attention on some days.

River Fishing
County River Name of Area
Cass S. Grand Amarugia Highlands Conservation Area
Clay Missouri Cooley Lake Conservation Area
Clay/Jackson Missouri LaBenite Park/Liberty Bend Conservation Area
Jackson Missouri Fort Osage
  Missouri Riverfront Park
  Blue Brown Athletic Area
Platte Platte Humphrey Access
  Platte Platte Falls Conservation Area
  Platte Kendzora Conservation Area
  Platte Marshall Conservation Area
  Platte Ringold Access
  Platte Schimmel City Access
  Platte Union Mill Access

 

For those who like a larger fishing hole, area conservation lakes and ponds may be better for you. These waters hold potential for largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie, channel catfish, redear sunfish, and hybrid striped bass. I always find it funny that even with a boat, I still seem to fish the edges of the lake like those on shore.

Lake and Pond Fishing
County Area Name Acres Boat Access
Cass Amarugia Highlands CA1 55 Yes
  Harrisonville North Lake 34 Yes
Clay Chaumiere Lake 1 No
  Englewood Lake 1 No
  Lakewood Lake 1 No
  Smithville Lake 7,200 Yes
Jackson Alex George Lake 8 No
  Bergan Lake 3 No
  Blue Springs Lake 720 Yes
  Blue Valley Lake 1 No
  Bowlin Road Pond 4 No
  James A. Reed Memorial WA2 252 N/A
  Lake Jacomo 970 Yes
  Lake of the Woods 1 No
  Lone Jack CA1 35 Yes
  Longview Lake 930 Yes
  North Terrace Lake 1 No
  Penn Valley Lake 1 No
  Prairie Lee Lake 150 Yes
  Scherer Lake 15 No
  Tarsney and Wood Lakes 17 & 8 Yes
  Troost Lake 3 No
  Wyatt Lake 3 No
Platte Guy B. Park CA1 17 Yes
1 Conservation Area
2 Wildlife Area

 

My favorite conservation area for fishing is Tobacco Lake at the Guy B. Park CA. It’s a hop, skip and a jump from home and always a nice place to fish. I remember taking our son when he was small enough to use an infant life jacket (except he didn’t like it because he couldn’t reach his hands to his mouth). Since it’s a “no wake” lake, it is always quiet (except for the occasional angler on his cell phone). If you fish a place often enough, you get to know the regulars who get to fish all the time – unlike us working stiffs! They’re always happy to see you and share their tips for the day.

For those of you who have not tried fishing yet, there are free fishing days or daily fishing passes, and even rod-and-reel loaners for those that don’t want to commit to the sport. If you have a particular species you would like to catch, you can find information on the species and more. If anything, it will be a good outing for the kids and you’ll soak up some vitamin D!

Before heading out, remember to check regulations for that area and take your fishing license, drinking water, sunscreen, polarized sunglasses, and life jackets. As my 5-year-old found out a year ago, life jackets are a good thing and leaning too far over the edge of the boat is bad – but that’s for another blog.

About the Author: Angela Sena serves as an Environmental Protection Specialist with the Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division at EPA Region 7. She has a degree in environmental science and management. Angela is a native of New Mexico and avid outdoorswoman.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Water Wednesday: “Mommy, Where Does It Go When I Flush?”

By Chrislyn Johnson

Last spring, when I was potty training my 3-year-old, he asked me where it goes after we flush the toilet. I thought about this before I answered him, because I have often overwhelmed the poor child with my answers. He once asked me “What is water?” and I told him it was two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom.

For most people, it is enough to be told that when you flush the toilet, it goes to the sewage treatment plant. Since I worked in wastewater regulation for a little while, I know it goes far beyond that, and I have trouble answering this seemingly simple question with a simple answer.

Once it goes down the drain, the water travels through a sometimes aging, sometimes modern, infrastructure of pipes to a wastewater treatment plant. Treatment options vary, from open lagoons to all-inclusive mechanical plants, all with the same goal: to treat sewage so it can be released into the environment. Many modern facilities do this with an “activated sludge” process that uses bacteria to naturally break down the waste.

As it enters the plant, the solids are separated out by a grit screen and settling basins. Heavier solids like plastics, eggshells, and intact items are settled out and removed; then taken to the landfill. The next step is the primary clarifier, where the sewage moves slowly along so heavier particles and sludge can settle out. At the same time, grease and oils dumped down the drain float to the top and are skimmed off the surface.

After the clarifier, the water is moved to the main part of the treatment: the aeration basin. Bacteria feast on the nutrients to break down the sewage and remove chemicals in the wastewater as it bubbles and roils with oxygen. Depending on the plant, an additional tank is sometimes added to help remove nitrogen. Since the treated water goes back into rivers and streams, this additional step is helpful in removing nitrogen before it can cause problems. Nitrogen can cause algal blooms that not only can be toxic, but also consume a lot of oxygen during decomposition, which kills the fish.

Following the aeration and nitrogen removal processes, the water then flows into a secondary clarifier. Water trickles out from weirs at the top of the large, circular tanks of the clarifier. The water is disinfected, either by chemical means (such as chlorination, similar to bleach), or through newer alternatives like ultraviolet (UV) lights. Once disinfected, the treated water is released into a nearby river or stream.

Whereas the water treatment is nearly finished in the secondary clarifier, the sludge often has a few more steps to completion. The bacteria slowly settle to the bottom of the clarifier into what is called the sludge blanket. Some of the sludge blanket from the clarifier is recycled and added back into the incoming wastewater to begin the treatment reaction in the aeration basin. Depending on the type of plant, the remainder of the sludge travels to the digesters for either aerobic or anaerobic digestion (where the bacteria eat each other).

Aerobic digestion uses oxygen to further break down the sludge. It is nearly odorless, but also costly since the process has to be manually oxygenated. The other common alternative is anaerobic digestion, which is not so odorless since it produces methane. However, the methane can be captured and used to generate electricity to operate the plant. The waste heat from the generators even can be used to keep the anaerobic digesters at the correct operating temperature. After leaving the digesters, water is removed from the sludge, which can then be disposed of or used as a soil conditioner. With clean water going back to the stream or river, and sludge going back to the earth, the cycle is complete.

I thought about this intricate series of steps that mimics the breakdown processes wastes would undergo in nature, given sufficient time and space. I thought about how fortunate we are to live in a country where water quality is a high priority, and we can make a daily difference to protect our local waterways (see graphic below).

I also thought about my son’s level of understanding, as he impatiently asked me again, “Where it go?” With all of this in mind, I looked down at my innocent little boy and told him, “It goes to the sewage treatment plant, honey.”

Click image to see larger version.

Click image to see larger version.

About the Author: Chrislyn Johnson is a Life Scientist with EPA Region 7’s Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division. She holds degrees in biology and photography from the University of Central Missouri and loves all things nature. She also enjoys access to flush toilets.

Sources:
Scientific American
U.S. Census Bureau
World Health Organization

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Wetlands Wednesday: Continue the Journey With Me South to Kansas

By Cynthia Cassel

As I mentioned in my blog article last week, we’re presenting a multi-part series during May to showcase the diverse wetlands of the four EPA Region 7 states and to celebrate the 25th anniversary of National Wetlands Month. Please join me as I travel to my picturesque home state of Kansas.

My husband was transferred to Washington State and then, 12 Julys later, transferred back to Kansas. Veteran road-trippers that we are, we decided to crisscross the state to re-familiarize ourselves with the landscape.

wet meadowWhat I know now, that I didn’t then, was that a vital part of the landscape is water-based. We saw a lot of green and gold on this round-trip from one corner of Kansas to the next and back again. I said a quiet “thank you” to all the producers of the good food that comes from their hard work.

After driving through one of those beautifully dramatic (not to mention loud) Kansas summer thunderstorms, we also saw farms with areas of standing water called Wet Meadows and Farmed Wetlands. As you read the descriptions below, think of these as vital pit stops for groups of tired and hungry birds as they migrate through Kansas.

Wet Meadows and Farmed Wetlands

As vital as water is to us, so it is for the fowl, mammals, and amphibians that call those farms their habitat, whether just for a short time or permanently. Next time you see Wet Meadows or Farmed Wetlands here in the Heartland, say a quiet “thank you” for the puddles and pools that are part of the landscape as well.

wet meadow 2Wet meadows are wetlands that occur in poorly drained areas and have herbaceous (non-woody) plants, such as sedges, rushes, and wetland wildflowers. Precipitation serves as their primary water supply so they are often dry in the summer. Water generally does not stand in these wetlands. During periods of high rainfall, wet meadows collect runoff, reducing the likelihood of seasonal flooding to low-lying areas downstream and, in the process, removing excess nutrients from runoff like a natural filter. This nutrient-rich environment provides vital food and habitat for many insects, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals.

wet meadow 3Temporary or seasonal wetlands, usually depressions lined with clay soils, are farmed at least once every few years. Farmed wetlands produce large quantities of insects for food and resting areas for migratory birds. Dark soils that warm early in spring provide food earlier, attracting higher shorebird and duck use and providing habitat for waterfowl breeding grounds all year. Farmed wetlands filter excess nutrients (such as phosphorous, nitrates, and pesticides) from field runoff. These wetlands also filter carbon that otherwise might be released into the atmosphere to produce carbon dioxide, thus helping protect the ozone layer.

 

Cynthia Cassel has worked as a Senior Environmental Employment (SEE) Program grantee with EPA Region 7’s Wetlands and Streams Protection Team for 5½ years. She received her Bachelor of Science from Park University. Cynthia lives in Overland Park, Kan.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Water Wednesday: CREAT Helps Build Resilient Communities

Introduction by Ken Deason

Extreme weather events, sea-level rise, shifting precipitation patterns, and temperature changes will affect water quality and availability. Managing these events poses significant challenges to water sector utilities in fulfilling their public health and environmental mission.

Creat LogoThe Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool (CREAT), developed under EPA’s Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative, assists drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater utility owners and operators in assessing risks to utility assets and operations. Version 2.0 of CREAT provides access to the most current scientific understanding of climate change, including downscaled climate model projections that will increase user awareness of projected changes in climate, related impacts, and potential adaptation options.

EPA Region 7 has three CREAT pilot projects currently demonstrating the value of the tool in assisting communities to become more resilient. One of the pilot projects is in Blair, Nebraska, northwest of Omaha. EPA is working with Allen Schoemaker with the Blair Public Works Department on the pilot project. We asked Allen to describe the city’s participation in the project:

By Allen Schoemaker

nebraskaIn 2014, the city of Blair was approached by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services to participate in the Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool program. The program is designed to help utilities evaluate the impacts of climate change to utilities. The city has had a couple of major weather-related impacts to our potable water treatment plant operations, and was excited to work with the EPA on this venture. In late 2014, Blair began an evaluation of impacts to the city’s potable water treatment plant from climate change, utilizing the CREAT program, which included working with EPA staff. The two main areas of concern being evaluated were flooding and drought.

In 2011, the Missouri River from Gavins Point Dam to Kansas City, Mo., flooded due to excessive snow pack and intense rain events in the Rocky Mountains during the early spring. Those events required the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) to intentionally flood many low-lying areas along the Missouri River. The Blair potable water treatment plant is constructed in the 100-year flood plain and most of the buildings are constructed one foot above the 100-year flood plain. However, the 2011 flooding was a 500-year event requiring the city to provide temporary flood protection to keep the city’s potable water treatment plant protected from the floodwaters. Floodwaters eventually peaked at 4 feet above the existing grounds of the potable water treatment plant. As a follow-up to that event, Blair has applied for and received Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Mitigation Grant funds to permanently construct flood control for the city’s potable water treatment plant. Construction work is currently underway on that project and it should be completed by spring 2016.

Because Blair had dealt with a major flood event and has a plan in place to deal with similar events, our focus of CREAT evaluations turned to drought.

In 2012, the USACE notified Blair, along with all water intake owners, that they needed to plan for an eventual release of only 9,000 cubic feet per second (CFS) of water from the Gavins Point Dam. A normal release is between 13,000 and 20,000 CFS. Blair needed to know the exact impact of the USACE’s proposed 9,000 CFS release, so we hired HDR Engineering of Omaha to conduct a study of the impacts associated with the city’s existing water intake structure due to the 9,000 CFS release. HDR reported that the city’s intake structure would be high and dry.

At this point, we started looking at options to deal with the low water releases. Through the CREAT program, we evaluated the past and future projected trends of temperatures and annual rainfall to help us determine the future demands for water and the overall impact of the USACE’s proposed low releases. Temperature patterns, both past and future, were showing a significant increase by CREAT and the annual rainfall was trending downward, compounding the challenges for our potable water treatment plant. Basically, demand is projected to increase and supply is projected to decrease.

Downtown Blair, Nebraska

Downtown Blair, Nebraska

We used CREAT to help us evaluate the different options for obtaining source water for our water intake during a drought. We looked at shallow wells, horizontal wells, submersible pumps that could be lowered into river water away from the city’s intake structure, a new intake structure constructed at a lower elevation, and external pumps installed on a barge located along the riverbank. We took into consideration capital costs, amount of source water obtained, environmental/permitting concerns and reliability.

Using these considerations, we evaluated each option through the CREAT program and rated their impacts, both in providing source water and budget. When the evaluation was completed, the two best options that we identified were installing external pumps onto the existing water intake structure that would be lowered into the source water at a lower elevation, and installing external pumps mounted on a barge that could be located at the water intake structure. The cost estimate for both of these options is $1 million.

There will be other considerations that will need to be evaluated, such as permits from the USACE and U.S. Coast Guard to allow a barge to be located along the riverfront at the city’s property, and an USACE permit for the external pumps that would be lowered into the Missouri River at low release. We also need to evaluate the structural integrity of the existing water intake structure to see if it is capable to support the external pumps and elevator system. If it is structurally able to support the external loads, we will need to construct a separate structure to support the system. These are all hurdles we still must clear before either of these two options is able to be put into action. In both options, these pumps would be used for a temporary time (1-2 months), providing source water to the city’s water intake structure. For longer periods of time, construction of a new water intake or horizontal wells were a better option.

To date, the EPA and I have held two phone conferences and one all-day workshop session to work on the CREAT program, conduct evaluations for the Blair potable water treatment plant, and identify impacts on source water as a result of climate changes for our area. The experience has been enlightening and thought-provoking as we look at all of the possible impacts to our source water for our water system, both now and into the future. I look forward to future conferences with the EPA and their staff to complete the review and evaluation of the impacts to the city’s source water for our water utility.

Benefits of CREAT

CREAT helps utilities organize and communicate risks from climate impacts and potential gains from adaptation to decision makers, stakeholders and citizens. Incorporating CREAT results with overall utility planning builds customer confidence that a utility is being proactive in identifying significant risks or gaps where additional planning may be needed. EPA Region 7 is also working with drinking water utilities in Hillsboro, Kan., and Fredericktown, Mo., to complete their own Climate Resilience Evaluation pilot projects in an effort to be better prepared for extreme weather events.

For more information on the Climate Resilience Evaluation and Awareness Tool, see EPA’s CREAT website.

 

Ken Deason is an Environmental Scientist who has worked for EPA since 1992. He currently is working in the Drinking Water Management Branch within Region 7’s Water, Wetland, and Pesticides Division. Prior to joining EPA, Ken worked as a geologist with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources’ Geological Survey. He graduated from Southern Illinois University with a Bachelor of Science in geology in 1980.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Water Wednesday: Thank a Chemist (or a Microbiologist)

By Jeffery Robichaud

Region 7 Science and Technology Center

Region 7 Science and Technology Center

If you religiously follow The Big Blue Thread – or more accurately, my pun-laden blog entries – you might have noticed that I switched from Deputy Director of our Environmental Sciences and Technology Division to Deputy Director of our Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division. My former group is responsible for numerous cutting-edge scientific endeavors, especially the cool work that goes on in our Region 7 Science and Technology Center, one of 10 EPA regional labs across the country.

So I wanted to give my former colleagues a shout-out and long overdue thanks ahead of time. April 19-25 is National Environmental Laboratory Professionals Week. This week was established by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) to celebrate environmental and public health labs that are responsible for protecting our health by analyzing water, soil and air, as well as contaminants in people, through chemical, biological or radiological testing.

In my new job, we rely heavily on the work of all the folks at our laboratory, who ensure that we receive timely and accurate analytical results regarding the quality of our waters. These results form the basis of numerous decisions, support our understanding of environmental conditions, and are used to bolster enforcement actions. We benefit from the hard work and talents of many professionals who serve the public behind the doors of our laboratory. However, because of shows like “NCIS” and “Bones,” the public gets a really skewed image of how these labs operate.

You don’t waltz in off the street, drop off a sample in a plastic baggie, and pop back 24 hours later to get your answer. In reality, laboratories function through an intricate dance of numerous staff involved in sample and container preparation, shipping and receiving, quality assurance, chain of custody, health and safety, data systems, and countless other tasks before the first sample is even brought to the chemists or microbiologists to begin their analysis.

So a hearty “thank you” goes out to the professionals at 300 Minnesota Avenue in Kansas City, Kansas. Keep up the fantastic work! We couldn’t do our own work without you.

Be sure to take some time April 19-25 to send your own shout-out to your state or local environmental laboratory, whether by setting up a tour or simply sending a tweet. (Let’s help APHL get #LabWeek trending.)

Jeffery Robichaud is a second-generation EPA scientist who has worked for the Agency since 1998. He currently serves as Deputy Director of EPA Region 7′s Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division. If you attended the University of Pennsylvania and took Inorganic Chemistry Lab during the early 1990s, you probably checked out an Erlenmeyer flask from him. (And he’s sorry about having to charge you for that lost thermometer!)

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Water Wednesday: Wichita State Edition

By Jeffery Robichaud

Do you know what day March 22nd was (besides the day that the Kansas Jayhawks suffered defeat at the hands of the Wichita State Shockers in the NCAA tournament)? It was World Water Day! Established in 1993 by the United Nations General Assembly, it was created as a day to highlight water-related issues throughout the global community, and to prepare for the management of water in the future. Each year, a new issue is spotlighted. This year’s theme is Water and Sustainable Development.

Enhancing Sustainable Communities with Green Infrastructure: A guide to Help Communities

Enhancing Sustainable Communities with Green Infrastructure: A Guide to Help Communities

Here in the United States, cities want to protect water quality while also receiving the greatest possible benefit from investments. Many communities are conserving, restoring, or enhancing natural locations while incorporating trees, rain gardens, vegetated roofs, and other practices into developed areas to manage rainwater. These types of approaches are known as Green Infrastructure. When incorporated into development and redevelopment activities, Green Infrastructure can be an integral component of sustainable communities because it protects the environment, while still providing other social and economic benefits.

Green Infrastructure isn’t “green” in the sense that it is new to development. It has a long history rooted in the concept of low-impact development, which came about in the early 1990s as part of a more cost-effective approach to dealing with storm water and minimizing its impacts on water quality.

Last fall, EPA completed “Enhancing Sustainable Communities with Green Infrastructure: A guide to help communities better manage storm water while achieving other environmental, public health, social, and economic benefits”. This document is aimed at helping integrate Green Infrastructure strategies into planning so that communities can be transformed. One of the key components of this report is the emphasis placed on developing a plan that can overcome some of the obstacles (technical, regulatory, financial, and institutional) that often limit widespread implementation.

Now you may ask yourself, “What does this have to do with Wichita State?” Well, EPA awarded a grant to Wichita State University’s Hugo Wall School of Public Affairs to establish an Environmental Finance Center to promote the development of financially and environmentally sustainable communities. This center provides services to state, local, and tribal governments in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. These efforts bolster the work of numerous communities, both big and small, which have undertaken some groundbreaking work in the area of Green Infrastructure.

Over the coming months, Region 7’s Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division will highlight these success stories and continue to share the benefits of incorporating green into design. To learn more, check out EPA’s Green Infrastructure website. You can also sign up to join GreenStream, an EPA listserv featuring updates on Green Infrastructure publications, training, and funding opportunities. Send an email to join-greenstream@lists.epa.gov.

Jeffery Robichaud is a second-generation EPA scientist who has worked for the Agency since 1998. He currently serves as Deputy Director of EPA Region 7′s Water, Wetlands, and Pesticides Division. Although he teaches at KU, his Penn Quakers failed to make the NCAA tournament this year.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.