Environmental Ideas, Six Words at a Time

By Jessica Orquina

It’s been three weeks since we launched Six Words for the Planet with SMITH Magazine and I’ve been delighted how many people shared their stories. I’ve enjoyed reading the thoughtful and creative six-word essays you’ve shared. Here are two of my favorites so far:

Perform a random act of sustainability.
George Sosa

Sweetest tweets still come from birds.
Melesha Owen

Earth Day may have gone by, but our collaboration with SMITH Magazine continues. I encourage each one of you to take a few moments, write Six Words for the Planet, and share your story.

For more information about Six Words for the Planet please read my previous blog post: Six Words for the Planet: What are Yours?

For inspiration to write your own Six Words for the Planet, watch the slideshow below!

Do you have Six Words for the Planet to share? Go to www.smithmag.net/planet and submit your six-word essay today!

About the author: Jessica Orquina works in the Office of External Affairs and Environmental Education as the social media lead for the agency. Prior to joining EPA, she served as a public affairs specialist at another federal agency and is a former military and commercial airline pilot. She lives, works, and writes in Washington, DC.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

What Water Means to You…in just Six Words

By Christina Catanese

Click for how to submit your six words!

I swear that pesky word counter at the bottom of my screen is mocking me.  My wordiness seems to get me in trouble, and my word count is always higher than I want it to be.  700 words when I need it to be 500.  253 when it has to be below 250.  100 words when I need it to be…6?

Six words!  How can you say anything in only six words?

It turns out you can say a lot. Believe it or not, there have been short stories and even memoirs written in just six words.

And now, EPA has teamed up with SMITH Magazine to launch the Six Words for the Planet project, where anyone (you!) can submit a six word essay about our planet.

Since this is the Healthy Waters Blog, we’ve obviously got water on our minds, so I and a few of my fellow EPA employees took a crack at writing our own six words… for water.

Water: could I use less? Yes.

-Christina

Headwaters to Bay, canoe that someday.

-Ken

Water? Almost everywhere; most, alas, undrinkable.

-Larry

Water Needs Energy. Energy Needs Water.

-Walter

Chesapeake and Delaware Bays…Our Legacy.

-Matt

Water. We can’t live without it.

-Nancy

Burdened mind. River walk. Feeling better.

-Alysa

When the currents are swift, portage.

-Brent

Everyone deserves clean water. Get involved.

-Tom

And now it’s your turn!  This Earth Day, take a few minutes to think about what the planet (water or otherwise) means to you, then pen your own six word essay and submit it here.  You might even have your six words featured on EPA websites or social media channels!

Get more information about Six Words for the Planet in this Greenversations Post.

About the Author: Christina Catanese has worked at EPA since 2010, and her work focuses on data analysis and management, GIS mapping and tools, communications, and other tasks that support the work of Regional water programs. Originally from Pittsburgh, Christina has lived in Philadelphia since attending the University of Pennsylvania, where she earned a B.A. in Environmental Studies and Political Science and an M.S. in Applied Geosciences with a Hydrogeology concentration. Trained in dance (ballet, modern, and other styles) from a young age, Christina continues to perform, choreograph and teach in the Philadelphia area.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.