National Award for Smart Growth Achievement Comes to Atlanta

Historic Fourth Ward Park. Photo credit: Gwen Keyes Fleming

Historic Fourth Ward Park. Photo credit: Gwen Keyes Fleming

 

As a former resident of Atlanta, I was delighted to learn that the “Overall Excellence” winner of this year’s National Award for Smart Growth Achievement is the Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail and Historic Fourth Ward Park. This EPA award provides much-deserved recognition for a project that has cleaned up old industrial areas and transformed them into fantastic amenities for Atlanta’s residents and the surrounding neighborhoods.

Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. has led a collaboration between government agencies, residents, businesses, neighborhood groups, foundations, and nonprofits to clean up and repurpose 22 miles of abandoned railroad corridor around downtown Atlanta. Building the Eastside Trail and the Historic Fourth Ward Park was the first stage of this transformation.

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State Capitals Go Green

A Greening America’s Capitals design option for a market in Indianapolis

 

Our Greening America’s Capitals program is making a visible difference in communities—literally changing the landscape of our nation’s state capitals. Since 2010, EPA has helped 14 state capitals and the District of Columbia create community designs that help clean the air and water, stimulate economic development, and make existing neighborhoods more vibrant places. This week, we announced three more capital cities that will be receiving assistance: Lansing, Michigan; Olympia, Washington; and Madison, Wisconsin.

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Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Big Improvements in Little Rock

Little Rock philanthropist Anita Davis discusses her efforts to revitalize the downtown with senior officials and staff from EPA, HUD, DOT, and USDA. Photo courtesy of the city of Little Rock.

Little Rock philanthropist Anita Davis discusses her efforts to revitalize the downtown with senior officials and staff from EPA, HUD, DOT, and USDA. Photo courtesy of the city of Little Rock.

This Monday and Tuesday, I spent time with Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Deputy Secretary Maurice Jones, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden, and Department of Transportation (DOT) Acting Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy Beth Osborne touring ongoing redevelopment efforts in Little Rock, Arkansas. Through the HUD-DOT-EPA Partnership for Sustainable Communities, each of our agencies has invested in Little Rock. Our tour gave us the chance to see how these investments are making a real difference.

In 2011, our Greening America’s Capitals program provided support to help the city envision improvements to the Main Street corridor downtown. With additional support from Clean Water Act funds, the city starting putting in place some of the green infrastructure improvement ideas born from that workshop.

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Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.