EPA Takes a Step Forward in Protecting our Nation’s Farm Workers

This blog was originally posted on the White House Blog.

Last week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard in order to protect the nation’s two million farm workers and their families from pesticide exposure.

I am proud that this administration has taken another step forward in protecting our nation’s farm workers, a cause that is at the very root of my passion for public service. My hero and grandfather, Cesar Chavez, fought tirelessly for the rights of farmworkers, from higher wages and worker compensation, to access to drinking water and safety from pesticides.

My grandfather’s work centered around justice and ensuring that hard working, decent people were treated with the respect and dignity that all human beings deserve. EPA’s revised Worker Protection Standard will afford farm workers similar health protections to those already enjoyed by other workers in other jobs. The rule, covering farms, forests, nurseries and greenhouses, has not been updated for 20 years – and certainly for many it is long overdue. Continue reading

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

A Step Forward: Protecting America’s Farmworkers

There are over 2 million farm workers in the United States today. Farm workers play an essential role in a strong American economy and in putting food on our tables. Each year, between 1,200 and 1,400 pesticide exposure incidents are reported on farms, fields, and forests subject to the Worker Protection Standard.

Workers exposed to these hazards on the job carry pesticides home on their clothing, exposing their families as well.  Sadly, the true number of incidents is actually much higher, as some studies estimate underreporting could range from 20 to 90 percent. These incidents lead to sick days, lost wages, medical bills, and absences from school.

Today, EPA is taking a step toward protecting farm workers and their families while supporting agricultural productivity by proposing commonsense revisions to the Worker Protection Standard.

EPA’s proposal aims to pull farm workers up toward the same level of protection from environmental and health hazards that other professions have had for decades. These updates would help protect millions of farm workers and their families from pesticide exposure through better training, increased access to information, improved safety precautions, and modernized compliance standards. The benefits reaped from preventing acute farm worker illnesses add up to $10-15 million a year. Continue reading

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.