Poster Contest Deadline is approaching!

I have talked with lots of students who are excited to submit their posters into the EPA’s Asthma Awareness Poster Contest.  Don’t miss out on this creative and fun learning opportunity!  Enter your poster into the Asthma Awareness Poster Contest by Friday May 10, 2013.  Students in grades 3-8 from Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin are invited to enter.  Possible poster topics can include good asthma control and management, avoiding asthma triggers and many others.

Three winners will be chosen from two age groups (3rd-5th grade and 6th-8th grade).  1st place winners will receive recognition on EPA websites, an award certificate and a prize pack.  2nd place winners will receive recognition on EPA websites, an award certificate and a Planet Earth DVD and 3rd place winners will receive recognition on EPA websites.  Please visit the Asthma Poster Contest’s website to learn how to enter.  Don’t forget to highlight your artistic talent and submit a poster by Friday May 10, 2013!

Shelby Egan is a student volunteer in the EPA’s Air and Radiation Division in Region 5, and is currently obtaining her Master’s degree in Urban Planning and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She has a passion for protecting natural resources, cities she’s never been to and cooking any recipe by The Pioneer Woman.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Asthma Awareness Poster Contest

The U.S. EPA is celebrating Asthma Awareness month this May! Students in the 3rd-8th grades from Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin are invited to participate in a poster contest.  Asthma is a serious, sometimes life threatening respiratory disease that can make it hard to breathe and affects the lives of over 25 million Americans.  Although there is no cure for asthma, there are ways to control its symptoms.  Help raise awareness about asthma by creating a poster that illustrates the different aspects about the condition.

Posters should help raise awareness about the positive aspects of asthma such as good asthma control and management, physical activity and asthma, asthma and the environment and asthma medication.  An example could be an illustration of how to avoid asthma triggers like mold, pet dander and secondhand smoke. Whether or not you suffer from asthma, this is a great way to inform other students about ways to manage asthma all the while having fun creating an artistic poster!  Please visit http://epa.gov/region5/asthmapostercontest to learn how to apply.  All entry forms and posters must be received by Friday May 10, 2013.

Shelby Egan is a student volunteer in the EPA’s Air and Radiation Division in Region 5, and is currently obtaining her Master’s degree in Urban Planning and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She has a passion for protecting natural resources, cities she’s never been to and cooking any recipe by The Pioneer Woman.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Just in Time for Don’t Fry Day

posterEleven-year-old Sueda has recess with her classmates on a playground without any trees. This sixth grader from New Mexico knows how important it is to be safe in the sun. She recently earned her school a shade structure from the SHADE Foundation by winning the national 2012 SunWise with SHADE Poster Contest www.epa.gov/sunwise/postercontest.html. Now Sueda and her classmates at the Albuquerque School of Excellence can stay shaded when they play outside.

In Sueda’s winning poster, two cactus characters offer their sunburned cactus friend some sun protection advice in the form of hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Meanwhile, a chameleon seeks shade under a leaf. Sueda was one of 12,000 participating students from 48 states, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands.  The poster contest is an annual event; submissions are due every year by April 1. The poster contest educates thousands of students each year about how to be SunWise.

May 25th is Don’t Fry Day www.epa.gov/sunwise/dfd.html, and Sueda’s cactus characters are the perfect reminder of what this day is all about: when outdoors, you need to Slip, Slop, Slap, Wrap, and Seek Shade to protect yourself from too much sun exposure. Slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, slap on a hat, wrap on sunglasses, and seek shade between 10am and 4pm. School may be over soon but the need to stay safe under the sun continues. How can you be safe in the sun this summer?

About the author: Julie Kunrath is an ASPH Fellow hosted by the SunWise program in the Office of Air and Radiation in DC.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Fuel to the Future

University of California Riverside students have developed clean, renewable grid-independent energy for 1.6 billion people currently without the convenience of electricity as part of EPA’s P3 – People, Prosperity, and the Planet—Program, a competition for designing solutions for a sustainable future.

Through P3, they are getting quality hands-on experience that brings their classroom learning to life and may lead to real world applications.   The UCR students have created a model that produces efficient, affordable, and sustainable energy.  The bonus…..it releases zero emissions!

Want to learn about how their project works?  Go to EPA’s YouTube Channel at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDtHCKCqoS8&feature=relmfu

Interested in the P3 program in your future?  Go to http://www.epa.gov/p3/

Yvonne Gonzalez is a SCEP intern with the Air and Radiation Division in Region 5. She is currently pursuing a dual graduate degree at DePaul University.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Poster contest for kids!

Students in grades K-8 can help raise awareness about sun safety and win great prizes by entering the 2012 SunWise with SHADE Poster Contest, organized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency SunWise Program and the SHADE Foundation.

The due date for entries is April 1, and more information is available at: www.epa.gov/sunwise/postercontest.html

Original, hand-drawn posters should show sun safety action steps. Participating students are eligible for state and national prizes. The national winner will be chosen through an online vote open to everyone. The grand prize is a family trip to Disney World and a shade structure for the winner’s school. Top posters will be displayed at the National Children’s Museum during summer 2012.

Julie Kunrath is an ASPH Fellow hosted by the SunWise program in the Office of Air and Radiation in DC.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Winning with Radon

My name is Hayden.  I am a sixth grader from Athens, GA.  I entered a poster contest about testing your home for radon and won first place in the state and second place for the nation. I learned a lot about radon and how each year it kills more people than drunk driving.  Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. Also, if you smoke, it can further increase your chances of getting lung cancer.

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas that can be found all over the United States.  It is a natural occurring element that comes from the ground.  Radon can seep through cracks or pipes and get into your home.  The odorless, invisible gas gets trapped inside buildings and houses which can be dangerous to your health.

Testing is the only way to determine the level of radon in your home, school or building. Radon detection kits are not very expensive and can be purchased online, as well as at hardware stores and other retail outlets.  The kits come with instructions that are easy to follow and should only take a few minutes of your time.

If you discover your home has high levels of radon, professionals can help reduce the amount of trapped radon and help you lower the risk of radon-induced lung cancer.  You can also build new homes that are equipped to be radon-resistant.  

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsors a national poster contest each year for children between the ages of 9 and 14. The radon specialists need your help in spreading facts about radon.  So get busy and spread the word that radon kills!   Visit www.sosradon.org to learn more about radon and to gather information about the annual poster contest.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

New Teacher Awards

Do you have a favorite environmental science teacher? What about a teacher that takes you outdoors, or better yet, brings the outdoors in to your classroom? Maybe your older brother or sister knows a teacher too. Tell them about the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators. Help them win by writing a letter of support telling EPA everything you are learning about the environment because of your teacher. If your teacher wins, they can get a plaque and $2,000! The deadline is Jan 31st, so don’t delay.

http://www.epa.gov/enviroed/teacheraward/index.html

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Reminder….PEYA Applications Due at the End of the Year

peya logoJust a quick reminder to start getting your applications together for the 2011 President’s Environmental Youth Award. All K-12 students in the U.S. and its territories are eligible to apply.

The PEYA program promotes awareness of our nation’s natural resources and encourages positive community involvement. Since 1971, the President of the United States has joined with EPA to recognize young people across the U.S. for protecting our nation’s air, water, land, and ecology. It is one of the most important ways EPA and the Administration demonstrate commitment to environmental stewardship efforts created and conducted by our nation’s young people.

Your project – or one you are sponsoring – could be an award winner.

To find out how to apply visit:  http://www.epa.gov/peya/index.html

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Documerica Returns!

students taking pituresRecently the National Archives and EPA launched a contest that I wish I could enter myself. I could, if I change my name, age, birth date and occupation, but since that would be frowned upon I’ll stick to what I’m doing behind the scenes.

Unlike those of us excitedly working on this project, students ages 13 to 18 plus college or graduate school students CAN participate. Now is the time for teens to get inspired about their environment!

When you become more in touch with your surroundings and the state of the planet, you might develop a heightened state of eco-awareness and feel a sense of “green-powerment.” You may come home from school and roll your eyes at your parents if they toss away recyclable goods, or forget those re-usable shopping bags or leave the water running. Regardless of the manner in which you communicate your newfound knowledge, in many cases you feel good doing so, especially when your friends are doing the same.

Right now, there is an opportunity for that energy and creativity to be part of an international project, recognized by renowned judges and exhibited around the United States. On top of that, the grand prize for this contest will be $500, courtesy of the Foundation for the National Archives.

http://documerica.challenge.gov/

Jeanethe Falvey, State of the Environment project-lead at the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Boston, Massachusetts.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.