Susquehana River

Spectacular views of bald eagles over the Susquehanna River

By Roy Seneca

Anybody who has witnessed the beauty of a bald eagle soaring above knows that it can be quite exhilarating.  Not only is the bald eagle a proud national symbol, but it is also an incredible environmental success story.

It was not too long ago that bald eagles in our skies were on the verge of extinction due to the impact of pesticides like DDT.  But today, bald eagles can be sighted in the skies across the country thanks to environmental laws that protect them and have allowed their population to surge.

Well, if you get a kick out of seeing one or two bald eagles, you should take a trip to the Conowingo Dam in Darlington, Md. to witness an amazing sight of up to 100 or more bald eagles in one location.  During late fall and throughout most of the winter, the Conowingo Dam on the Susquehanna River may be the best location east of the Mississippi to witness these incredible raptors.

A shot of a bald eagle in Conowingo, MD. Photo courtesy of Flickr photographer daisyj85 from EPA’s State of the Environment Photo Project

A shot of a bald eagle fishing at the Conowingo. Photo courtesy of Flickr photographer daisyj85 from EPA’s State of the Environment Photo Project

The bald eagles congregate at the dam because it provides them with some easy meals.  When the dam’s turbines are running, it provides a steady water flow filled with fish on the surface where the bald eagles and other birds swoop in to feast on.

The location also attracts large numbers of gulls, herons, black vultures and other birds, but the bald eagles are the stars of the show.  When they are not fishing, the bald eagles sometimes perch in nearby trees and perform acrobatic shows in the sky above the river.  Photographers, birdwatchers and families come out to see the birds throughout the season.

It’s peak viewing time if you’d like to see for yourself.   For more details, check out this blog.

About the Author: Roy Seneca works in the press office for EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Region.

 

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Extreme Makeover-Land Edition

Completed Roberto Clemente ParkYou’d never know that this now-bucolic property on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Lancaster County with an occasional bald eagle soaring through had been a century-old abandoned site used for illegal dumping.

It took our EPA brownfields program to jump-start the cleanup and launch a promising future for this 25-acre riverside land.

So how did we do it? With a lot of help from our friends.(see link at http://www.epa.gov/reg3hwmd/bf-lr/newsletter/2007-Spring/Lorax.html)

We provided a brownfields grant in 2005 to assess the site and check its history. The thumbs-up results got people interested in managing the property, and leveraged a quarter million dollars for cleanup and redevelopment.

The Lancaster County Conservancy took it from there, buying the property with grand plans to make it a natural wonder for people, wildlife and migratory birds alike.

Are you aware of other properties that could use similar makeovers? Let us know.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.