Anniversary

Make Some Noise: the Clean Water Act Turns 40!

By Jon Capacasa

There are all sorts of noises being made in celebration of today’s 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act.

Fire on Cuyahoga River Jun 29, 1969

Fire on Cuyahoga River Jun 29, 1969: The Cuyahoga River in Ohio becomes so polluted that it catches on fire. The fire helped spur an avalanche of water pollution control activities like the Clean Water Act by bringing national attention to water pollution issues.

Not the blaring type you typically hear on New Year’s Eve, but rather the noises associated with cleaner water – the squeals of young fishermen hauling in a fish from a local creek… the hum of a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment plant… the crunch of shovels clearing ground for rain gardens and streamside tree buffers… the clang of a cash register ringing up a marine sale… the buzz of a family picnicking along the river.

That’s music to the ears of those of us who remember when we faced health and environmental threats in our waters that are almost unimaginable by our standards today.

Since 1972, the Clean Water Act has kept tens of billions of pounds of raw sewage, chemicals and trash out of our waterways, and we’ve doubled the number of waters that meet safety standards for swimming and fishing.

In my travels around the Mid-Atlantic Region, I’ve seen the impressive work we’ve done with watershed groups and many of our other partners to improve the quality of our waters. The number of folks engaged in cleanup efforts for their local waterway is at an all-time high.  And the results have been overwhelming.

Black Water Falls, West Virginia

Black Water Falls, West Virginia

Migratory fish can now travel the full length of the Delaware River due to major increases in oxygen levels.   A major interstate program is now place for restoring the Chesapeake Bay, including a landmark pollution budgetGreen infrastructure techniques are sprouting up in our major cities and small communities as a cost-effective way to control stormwater pollution and improve community livability.  And economic development along urban waterfronts has burgeoned, like the famous Baltimore Inner Harbor and along the Anacostia River in Washington D.C., driven by commitments to cleaner water.

In every corner of the region, we have initiatives underway to protect our most irreplaceable resource, producing environmental, economic, community and public health benefits.

We’ve come a long way.  But there’s much more to do.  And we need your help to continue the progress and take the next steps.

So what does clean water mean to you?  Let us know.

Author’s Note:  Jon Capacasa is director of the Water Protection Division in EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Region.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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The Clean Water Act’s Big 4-0

By Tom Damm

Clean Water Act 40th Anniversary Banner

The Clean Water Act is celebrating its 40th anniversary next week.  Can’t think of the perfect gift?  We’ve got some ideas.

  • Save water around the home.   Save water and protect the environment by choosing WaterSense labeled products and taking simple steps to conserve.
  • Dig a rain garden or install a rain barrel. With a rain garden or a rain barrel, capture stormwater before it carries yard and street pollutants into sewer systems and out to local rivers and streams.
  • Volunteer in your community.  Find a watershed organization and volunteer to help. Use EPA’s Adopt Your Watershed to locate groups in your community.  If you can’t find a group to join or want to organize your own activity, check out the Watershed Stewardship Toolkit with eight things you can do to make a difference in your watershed.
  • Pick up after your pet.  Pet waste contains nutrients and bacteria that can wash into local waterways if left on the ground.
  • Do a stormwater stencil projectStencil a message next to the street drain reminding people “Dump No Waste – Drains to River” with the image of a fish. Stencils are also available for lakes, streams, bays, ground water and oceans, as well as the simple “Protect Your Water” logo with the image of a glass and faucet.

To celebrate this big milestone in the life of the Clean Water Act, get involved.  We can all do something to build on the remarkable strides made in water protection over the past four decades.

You can check out more items on the Clean Water Act’s “gift registry” here. And let us know of other steps you’ve taken to further clean and safe water.

About the Author: Tom Damm has been with EPA since 2002 and now serves as communications coordinator for the region’s Water Protection Division.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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20 Years of ENERGY STAR

By: Brittney Gordon

Let’s take a little trip back in time to the year 1992. Where were you at that time? I was in the 7th grade at Pikesville Middle School in Baltimore County, trying my best to overcome the awkwardness that comes with the pre-teen years. But outside of my little world, a lot was happening in this country. For example:

1.)    A gallon of gas cost $1.05

2.)    Bill Clinton became the 42nd President of the United States

3.)    The Washington Redskins won the Super Bowl

4.) Jack Nicolson taught us all that Tom Cruise could not “handle the truth” in A Few Good Men

5.)    Cheers, Roseanne and Murphy Brown were on TV

Yep, a lot happened in 1992, including the labeling of the first ENERGY STAR qualified product—a computer. Fast forward 20 years and EPA’s ENERGY STAR label can now be found on products in more than 65 different categories, with more than five billion qualified products sold over the past two decades. In that time over 1.3 million new homes, and tens of thousands of facilities now proudly carry the ENERGY STAR certification, using dramatically less energy and producing substantially less greenhouse gas emissions than their peers.

Back in the early days, those here at EPA had no idea how influential this program would become over time. We conceptualized ENERGY STAR as a way to help American consumers and businesses make energy efficient choices, with the goal of reducing pollution in our air and protecting our health and the environment. EPA saw an opportunity to harness the forces of the market to meet those goals in a way that would save people money and give consumers more choices. It was a pretty tall order, but today ENERGY STAR is one of the most well known brands in the country, with over 80 percent of Americans recognizing it as the symbol of superior energy efficiency. Over the past 20 years, Americans with help from ENERGY STAR, have saved a total of nearly $230 billion on utility bills and prevented more than 1.7 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions.

Here at ENERGY STAR we know that much of the success of this program is due to the diligence of the American people, who have made protecting the climate an important goal in their everyday lives. We thank you for your commitment and hope that you will continue to grow with us.

For more information on ENERGY STAR’s 20th anniversary, check out our website. To take a video ride through ENERGY STAR’s history, click here.

Brittney Gordon is a member of EPA’s ENERGY STAR communications team. She began working for EPA in 2010 after a career in television news.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.