This Year in EPA Science

By Kacey FitzpatrickResearch Recap - New Year's Edition

 

Our EPA researchers were hard at work in 2014—so to highlight that effort, we’ve put together a list of the ten most popular blogs from this year.

Happy New Year!

  1. How Many Breaths Do You Take Each Day?
    The average person takes between 17,280 and 23,040 breaths a day. That’s a lot of opportunity for pollutants to get into your lungs and body and to increase health risks if you are exposed to air pollution. EPA researchers are working to provide the science to protect air quality and our health.
    Read more.
  2. Green Roofs Keep Urban Climates Cooler
    EPA researchers and partners explored the three roofs—cool, green, and hybrid—designed to absorb less heat and offset the “urban heat island” effect. They compared benefits and trade-offs and their findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
    Read more.
  3. Discover AQ: Tracking Pollution from the Skies and Space Above Denver
    EPA scientists teamed up with colleagues from NASA to advance clean air research. The study, known as DISCOVER-AQ, will give scientists a clearer picture of how to better measure air pollution with an array of instruments positioned on the earth’s surface, from the air, and from satellites.
    Read more.
  4. The Dose Makes the Poision, Or Does It?
    The phrase “the dose makes the poison” has been a central tenant of toxicology and an important concept in human health risk assessment. The more we learn about the health effects of chemicals, however, the more we realize things may not be quite this simple.
    Read more.
  5. Visualize Air Quality with RETIGO
    EPA scientists developed the Real-Time Geospatial Data Viewer, or “RETIGO,” a free, web-based tool that allows users to visualize air quality data derived from any number of monitoring technologies. RETIGO puts the power of analysis in the user’s hands with its interactive platform and easy-to-navigate interface.
    Read more.
  6. Human Health Risk Assessment: What It’s All About
    Risk is something we all understand but have you ever wondered exactly what Human Health Risk Assessment is? EPA’s Kacee Deener explains the concept of risk and why human health risk assessment is important.
    Read more.
  7. Street Trees: More Than Meets the Eye
    In the 2013, EPA scientists began research on “street trees” to assess their benefits. Have you ever wondered about the benefits of trees in your own backyard? You don’t have to be an arborist to find out; you can use i-Tree, a USDA Forest Service model that uses sampling data to estimate street tree benefits.
    Read more.
  8. Air Censors Citizen Science Toolbox
    Researchers at EPA have developed the virtual Air Sensors Citizen Science Toolbox. It will provide guidance and instructions to citizens to allow them to effectively collect, analyze, interpret, and communicate air quality data. The ultimate goal is to give citizens like you the power to collect data about the air we breathe.
    Read more.
  9. Picturing Algal Blooms in Local Waterways
    This summer, the National Environmental Education Foundation teamed up with EPA and the North American Lake Management Society to bring attention to algal blooms and their association with nutrient pollution by hosting the 2014 Algal Bloom Photo Contest.
    Read more.
  10. Globally Linking Scientific Knowledge through the Adverse Outcome Pathways Wiki
    In September, EPA and our partners released the online Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Wiki—an interactive, virtual encyclopedia for the development and evaluation of adverse outcome pathways. Our goal for the AOP Wiki was to create an easy-to-use tool that will stimulate, capture, and use crowd-sourced knowledge from the scientific community.
    Read more.

 

If you have any comments or questions about what I shared or about the week’s events, please submit them below in the comments section!

About the Author: Kacey Fitzpatrick is a student contractor and writer working with the science communication team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Financing Faster, Cheaper, Greener Urban Stormwater Management

Partnerships, market-based incentives, and private sector investment are all key elements of driving effective and affordable urban stormwater innovation.

Partnerships, market-based incentives, and private sector investment are all key elements of driving effective and affordable urban stormwater innovation.

By Dominique Lueckenhoff

Cities and towns across the region are facing huge infrastructure needs to manage urban stormwater runoff, a growing contributor to water pollution. That’s why EPA convened a Sustainable Stormwater Financing Forum in Washington, DC on December 9.

This first-of-its-kind forum – described as “ground-breaking”, “visionary”, and “unique” – hosted representatives of federal, state, and local governments, non-government organizations, and academia, along with private sector engineers, developers, and finance industry representatives. How important was it that all of these different organizations came together? Seth Brown of the Water Environment Federation (WEF) may have said it best: “Making connections between these sectors is vital for the future growth of innovative financing/funding approaches that are needed for the successful management of urban stormwater runoff.”

The forum covered topics from partnerships to market-based incentives and private sector investment, all key elements of driving effective and affordable urban stormwater innovation. DC’s Stormwater Retention Credit program and the Philadelphia Water Department’s Greened Acre Retrofit Program were two of the localized programs discussed with the audience. Without a doubt, the highlight of the forum was an in-depth discussion of a community-based public-private partnership recently adopted by Prince George’s County in Maryland. Under an agreement, the County will partner with the private company to pilot $100 million of green infrastructure projects. According to Prince George’s County, the projects are designed to “provide cost savings, create thousands of local jobs and boost economic development.”

Sustainable solutions to urban stormwater runoff have the potential to spur local economic development, create jobs, and improve quality of life for communities, all while protecting the environment. It was inspiring to hear from experts and leaders in the field about the innovative approaches that will be critical to addressing complex environmental problems – like urban stormwater runoff – today and into the future.

About the author: Dominique Lueckenhoff is the Deputy Division Director of the Water Protection Division in EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Office.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Happy Holidays!

Research Recap- Holiday Edition

Due to the short work week, the Research Recap will return next week. Thank you for your interest in EPA research, and happy holidays to all!

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Safer water in the sky

The Aircraft Drinking Water Rule protects drinking water aboard aircraft

The Aircraft Drinking Water Rule protects drinking water aboard aircrafts

by Jennie Saxe

In my first days at EPA, I was part of a team of scientists and engineers who collected onboard water samples from aircraft at the Philadelphia International Airport. It was a long, hectic day of running from gate to gate to sample water from a wide variety of airlines and aircraft types, usually while the crew was facing a quick turn-around. But when I thought about all of the passengers I had seen through the course of the day, I knew what we were doing had a real impact on public health.

This was a precursor to a larger sampling effort which led EPA to conclude at the time that drinking water for passengers and crew on aircraft was not adequately protected. To ensure that the water on aircraft is safe to drink, EPA worked with the US Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the airline industry to develop the Aircraft Drinking Water Rule (ADWR), which was finalized in 2009.

Just as a multiple-barrier approach with treatment, monitoring, reporting, and notification requirements ensures safe water delivery for traditional public water systems under the Safe Drinking Water Act, a similar approach was adapted for these unique water systems aboard aircraft. The ADWR requires airlines to develop operations and maintenance plans, sample for coliform bacteria, routinely disinfect and flush aircraft onboard water systems, and perform inspections. If a water sample indicates a problem, airlines must contact EPA, take corrective actions, and let their passengers and crew know about the problem. Together, these steps protect passengers and crew from acute contaminants that could make them sick, even after an exposure as brief as an airplane flight.

In 2012, EPA signed an agreement with Amtrak that further protects drinking water on trains, too. Amtrak’s operations and maintenance plans already required routine disinfection and flushing of water tanks on its rail cars. The agreement with EPA means that every railcar is also sampled for coliform bacteria. Together, these actions protect train crews and the more than 25 million passengers that travel by rail every year.

As the busy holiday travel season begins, many of us will find ourselves taking to the sky or riding the rails to visit loved ones or to squeeze in a vacation. Once you’re on your way, you can pass up the caffeinated, alcoholic, and soft drinks. Save those calories for holiday goodies – wet your whistle with water!

 

About the author: Dr. Jennie Saxe joined EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Region in 2003 and works in the Water Protection Division on sustainability programs. She carries a refillable water bottle on all of her travels.

 

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Protecting Research Volunteers: It’s All Part of the Family

By Dr. Toby Schonfeld

2014 Conference

2014 Advancing Ethical Research Conference

You know that great feeling you get when you gather with friends or family members that you haven’t seen in a while? I’m talking about that “I’m part of something special” feeling, where you barely even have to finish a sentence before others are agreeing with you, or exclaiming “Me too!” or just seem to really understand your perspective. In short, these people “get” you.

That’s the feeling I get when I attend the annual meeting of Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R), as my EPA colleague Dan Nelson and I did in early December. PRIM&R is a place where people who care deeply about human subject research protections gather to share best practices and to learn from experts in ethics and compliance about contemporary strategies for human subject protections. Officially, the organization provides “professionals responsible for ensuring research protections, and those involved in the design and implementation of research protocols, with education, practical tools, and cutting-edge strategies” (PRIM&R website accessed December 23, 2014: http://www.primr.org/about/).

This year’s Advancing Ethical Research conference was no exception. More than 2,700 professionals traveled to Baltimore to participate in 130-plus break-out sessions and several special events throughout the three-day meeting.

The keynote speakers were particularly engaging this year. John Wilbanks, the Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks, discussed innovative processes for informed consent in the mobile era. The Director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, drew a vivid picture of the history of clinical trials in HIV/AIDS over the past three decades, and included important comparisons between this history and current research involving ebola. Finally, Susan Lederer from the University of Wisconsin-Madison gave insights into the life of Henry Beecher, well known as the “whistle-blower” of unethical research in the 1960s.

Attending meetings like PRIM&R enhances our work at the Agency in a number of ways. Since EPA is one of the 16 agencies that has signed onto the Department of Health and Human Services’ regulation to protect human subjects (known as the Common Rule), we share a “parent” regulation with many other research partners. Interacting with others who apply the regulation to a variety of kinds of research enables us to learn from them how they approach issues and share with them our approaches.

As part of the sharing process, Dan and I held a “meet the EPA” session, where staff from Institutional Review Boards across the country learned about EPA’s specific research protections. Now, they will understand our particular context when research proposals supported by EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant program come across their desks. Dan and I also participated in several other sessions as presenters, which enabled us to share our expertise with the rest of the human research protections community.

Through these and similar mechanisms , the Agency supports and advances important science while also ensuring that those of us who review projects for regulatory compliance are part of a community of practice that also cares deeply about the protection of the volunteers who so generously agree to be human subjects to further research. For Dan and me, they are all kind of like family.

About the Author: Dr. Toby Schonfeld is EPA’s Human Subjects Research Review Official and the Director of the Agency’s Program in Human Research Ethics and Oversight.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

I’m Dreaming of Green Holidays

By Stephanie Businelli

Greeting cards have all been sent, the holiday rush is through. Not quite? With the beginning of the holiday season comes the beginning of the holiday stress. And, if you’re like me and want to have a green holiday season, that adds to the challenges.

But, our Greening Your Holidays Pinterest board has great ideas to help. With suggestions on how to reduce holiday food and paper waste, as well as green decoration ideas, you’ll be able to relax and roast chestnuts on an open fire in no time. Check out the tips on DIY wreaths, new uses for old holiday cards, gift wrapping gone green, and more.

May your days be merry and bright and may all your holidays be green!DIY

About the Author: Stephanie Businelli is a Biological Basis of Behavior major and Environmental Studies minor at the University of Pennsylvania. She interned on the Communications Services Staff in EPA’s Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery. She loves the most wonderful time of the year and wishes you and yours a very merry (green) holiday season.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

Survive, Adapt, and Grow: EPA, Rockefeller Foundation Team Up for Resilient Cities

LekKadeli Lek Kadeli

By Lek Kadeli

“City Resilience: The capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems within a system to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience.”

Rainbow over a cityscape

EPA is a platform partner for 100 Resilient Cities.

EPA recently announced a partnership to help communities across the United States and around the world achieve that very definition of city resilience by supporting 100 Resilient Cities, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. Agency sustainability scientists and other experts will help urban communities take actions today to realize vibrant and healthy futures.

100 Resilient Cities was launched in 2013 to provide urban communities with access to a network of expertise, innovative tools, and models that will help them meet and bounce back even better from serious challenges—from chronic stresses such as air pollution and diminishing access to clean water, to more sudden events including floods, “superstorms” and other weather events, and acts of terrorism.

To support the partnership, EPA researchers will work directly with urban communities to share a variety of innovative tools and initiatives they have developed to meet just such challenges. For example:

  • The National Stormwater Calculator, an easy-to-use, online tool will help communities effectively tap innovative green infrastructure techniques to reduce nutrient pollution and the risk of local flooding, while also planning for the increase of stormwater runoff that is expected due to climate change.
  • EnviroAtlas, is a multi-scale, geographical-based online mapping, visualization, and analysis tool that integrates more than 300 separate data layers on various aspects of how natural ecosystems benefit people. The tool provides communities with a resource for developing science-based, strategic plans that sustain the ability of “ecosystem services” to absorb and mitigate stresses—a critical aspect of resiliency.
  • The Triple Value Systems tool provides an interactive model built on the dynamic relationship among economic, societal, and environmental impacts. Simulations illustrate the tradeoff and benefits of different decisions, supporting consensus building in pursuit of sustainable, resilient communities.
  • Incorporating a new generation of low cost, portable, and low maintenance air quality sensors into community-based air quality monitoring and awareness resources, such as “The Village Green Project,” will help individuals take action to protect their health, and community leaders to reduce the impacts of poor local air quality.
  • CANARY Event Detection Software, developed by EPA researchers in partnership with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories, is an early warning system for detecting contaminants in drinking water. Recognized as a top 100 new technology by R&D Magazine, it helps water utilities continually monitor for threats and take early action to minimize disruptions.
EPA's Village Green Project, a solar-topped bench with air sensors

The Village Green project

EPA’s leadership advancing the science of sustainability and resiliency makes us a natural fit for supporting 100 Resilient Cities. Joining the network of other “platform partners” will help us share our research results and best practices and expand the impact of what our partners and we learn. We are thrilled to be part of this important effort advancing more sustainable and resilient communities, and look forward to a future where cities across the globe survive, adapt, and grow—no matter what.

About the Author: Lek Kadeli is the Acting Assistant Administrator in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

This Dallas Habitat for Humanity Home Is Energy Efficiency in Action

Ron Curry Ron Curry

R6-curry

Last week, during our Energy Efficiency Week of Action, I had the pleasure of visiting an energy efficient home in a Dallas neighborhood. The home I visited was being built as part of last year’s commemoration of the centennial anniversary of the Texas Section of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and together with Habitat for Humanity they built a great home that is green and affordable.

These homes include many energy efficiency features including passive lighting, high efficiency windows and doors, spray foam insulation, tankless water heating, low volatile organic compounds paint, and ecofriendly materials. Some even have solar panels and rainwater harvesting. Because of these construction methods, these homes have received the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification.

Continue reading

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

La norma nueva mantendrá a las comunidades seguras de las cenizas de carbón

Mathy Stanislaus Mathy Stanislaus

Por Mathy Stanislaus

 

Temprano en la mañana del 22 de diciembre de 2008, hubo una avería en una represa de la Autoridad del Valle de Tennesse en la Central Eléctrica de Combustibles Fósiles de Kingston cerca de Knoxville, la cual derramó 1.1 mil millones de galones de lodo de cenizas de carbón sobre un área de unos 300 acres. Las cenizas inundaron el río Emory y cubrieron las casas, las cuales pusieron en riesgo la salud de la gente y el medio ambiente. Hubo una ruptura en una importante tubería de gas, varias casas fueron destruidas y un vecindario cercano fue evacuado. Las cenizas de carbón son desechos producidos de la generación de energía a base de carbon, y contienen elementos tóxicos como mercurio, cadmio y arsénico. Esto constituye riesgos significativos a la salud si penetra el abastecimiento de agua potable o se mezcla con el aire que respiramos.
Hoy, la administradora Gina McCarthy firmó una nueva norma para ayudar a asegurar que esto no vuelva a ocurrir y que las cenizas de carbón se manejen de manera segura. Esta nueva norma protege las comunidades de las fallas en los embalses de cenizas de carbón, como la falla catastrófica de Kingston, Tenn., así como de derrames y establece salvaguardias para prevenir la contaminación del agua subterránea y las emisiones de aire de la disposición de las cenizas de carbón.
Después del derrame de Kingston, lanzamos un esfuerzo nacional para determinar cómo podríamos proteger a las comunidades de los costos ambientales y económicos en caso de que ocurriera otro derrame de cenizas de carbón. Evaluamos la integridad estructural de más de 500 embalses superficiales y otras estructuras donde se almacenan las cenizas de carbón. Comenzamos con los embalses que tienen el mayor potencial de daños en caso de que estos fallaran. También estudiamos extensamente los efectos de las cenizas de carbón en el medio ambiente y la salud pública y evaluamos más de 450,000 comentarios sobre nuestra norma propuesta, escuchamos los testimonios en ocho audiencias públicas y revisamos comentarios acerca de las notificaciones de nuevos datos y análisis.
La norma nueva fue formulada conforme a nuestros hallazgos en este proceso. Esta requiere que los embalses y vertederos sean inspeccionados regularmente para determinar su seguridad estructural, y monitorear las aguas subterráneas cercanas para identificar señales de fugas. Los dueños de centrales eléctricas serán requeridos de proveer actualizaciones regularmente sobre su cumplimiento. También tendrán todavía la oportunidad de reciclar las cenizas de carbón, lo cual les ahorra los costos de disposición mientras reduce las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y la cantidad de otros recursos que utilizamos.
Las comunidades y los estados desempeñarán un papel en la implementación de la norma nueva, también. La gente podrá obtener información con mayor facilidad acerca de los embalses de cenizas de carbón cerca de sus hogares. Los estados trabajarán con nosotros para crear sus propios planes para implementar los nuevos requisitos.
Estamos comprometidos con mantener las comunidades seguras de otros derrames de cenizas de carbón. Esta nueva norma ayudará a asegurar que los derramos como el ocurrido en la central de Kinston nunca volverán a suceder.

Infórmese: http://www2.epa.gov/coalash

 

 

Acerca del autor: Mathy Stanislaus es el administrador adjunto de la Oficina de Desechos Sólidos y Respuesta a Emergencias (OSWER, por sus siglas en inglés).

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.

This Week in EPA Science

By Kacey Fitzpatrick

Research Recap- Holiday Edition

‘Twas the week before Christmas, and all through the Agency,
Our researchers were working, so much discovery!

Is there one place, where all this can be found?
One science review, no looking around?

Here’s my present to you, no need to unwrap
Right here on this blog, your Research Recap!

 

 

  • Climate Change and Extreme Events Research Showcased at American Geophysical Union Meeting
    EPA’s Dr. Michael Hiscock recently attended the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Fall Meeting where he convened a technical session focused on the complex interaction between climate change, extreme events, air and water quality. The session featured scientists and research teams from 20 different countries. Dr. Hiscock shared his experience on the blog.
    Read more.
  • New Challenge: Put Technology to Work to Protect Drinking Water
    EPA along with other federal agencies and private partners announced the Nutrient Sensor Challenge. The challenge will help accelerate the development of sensors that can be deployed in the environment to measure nutrients in our country’s waterways. Its goal is to have new, affordable sensors up and running by 2017.
    Read more.
  • Growing Environmentally-Friendly Packaging Out of Mushrooms
    Gavin McIntyre and Eben Bayer were awarded an EPA Small Business Innovative Research grant in 2009 to fund their research for Ecovative, a biodesign company. Using the roots of mushrooms, Ecovative turns agricultural waste into “green” packing materials, insulation and even surfboards. Their business was recently featured on National Public Radio.
    Read more.
    And check out Gavin McIntyre’s It All Starts with Science blog on Ecovative.
  • The Untold History of Women in Science and Technology
    Listen to EPA’s Gina McCarthy and other women from across the Administration tell the stories of their personal heroes across the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).
    Listen to the stories here.

 

If you have any comments or questions about what I share or about the week’s events, please submit them below in the comments section!

Happy Holidays!

About the Author: Kacey Fitzpatrick is a student contractor and writer working with the science communication team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.