Comments on: Scientist at Work: Bill Shuster https://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/11/scientist-at-work-bill-shuster/ The EPA Blog Mon, 14 Dec 2015 16:24:21 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Bill Shuster https://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/11/scientist-at-work-bill-shuster/#comment-3276 Tue, 20 Nov 2012 17:16:07 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/science/?p=1570#comment-3276 Good training in one of the natural science disciplines is definitely a plus. What you describe here is well within the purview of hydrology, especially as it intersects with meteorology. If you are interested in further researchering this area of endeavor, run searches on terms such as snow hydrology, mountain range hydrology and snowpack hydrology, hillslope hydrology, etc. These are areas in which there is a great deal of active research.

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By: Tom Rothschild https://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/11/scientist-at-work-bill-shuster/#comment-3275 Sat, 17 Nov 2012 11:47:50 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/science/?p=1570#comment-3275 I am currently thinking hydrology would have been a better focus for my B.S. major than chemistry (U.T.Martin,1978). I find the field to be more active than my advisors said Chemistry would be. I was interested in knowing if you thought an increase of fresh water into the ocean would be a good influence. My projected theory is if more rainfall happened within our natural boundaries of mountain ranges, this should increase rainfall turning into snow as the clouds would not find their way over this barriers, and then to the ocean. This increased snow would trap greenhouse gases, besides providing more snowmelt. Is this what hydrology would help me interpret?

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