It’s Raining Flowers, So Hold Your Water

Beneficial uses of Rain Gardens

Beneficial uses of Rain Gardens

On my block, you’ll know if we had a good rain if the river of water along the street curbs and sidewalks is heading to the corner storm drain. Heck, why waste that water when I can keep it on my property and grow a lovely rain garden. I planted one in 2009. It’s a modest little rain-sucker, but one that at least showed I cared. It makes good sense to plant a rain garden and take other steps to contain rainwater on your property and to do more for the environment with these tips. How does a rain garden work? The soil and plants absorb the water and filter pollution. The garden slows down and reduces the volume of rainfall runoff before it enters the drain, but doesn’t pond since it’s quick draining. The water from your roof, driveway and sidewalk collects fertilizers, pet waste, oil and other pollutants as it runs off into the nearest storm drain and out into your local river or stream. Rain gardens are just one way to contain runoff and protect your streams and rivers. You can find more suggestions here. Have you planted a rain garden, installed a rain barrel or taken other steps to reduce runoff? If so, let us know how you’re doing in holding your water.