Day In the Life: A Visit to Boston

I went home to Boston on Tuesday to engage with public health professionals and experts to discuss the important link between the health of our environment and the health of our children. We know climate change is fueling environmental public health problems such as asthma and other respiratory ailments, which is why the agency is taking action to reduce carbon pollution and greenhouse gas emissions through the Clean Power Plan and other initiatives.

Here’s a look at my day:

Excited to have GinaEPA in Boston today: mtg w/families & healthcare workers re impacts of clean air & President Obama’s #ClimateActionPlan

— EPA New England (@EPAnewengland) August 19, 2014

I started the day at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

Administrator McCarthy and the staff from Boston Children’s Hospital Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) show they are united on improving the health of children suffering from asthma and respiratory problems aggravated by environmental factors.

Administrator McCarthy and the staff from Boston Children’s Hospital Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU).

I had the opportunity to meet with Dr. Alan Woolf and his colleagues in the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, a group of health care professionals dedicated to caring for and reducing asthma symptoms in children.

Administrator McCarthy talks with a nurse at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

Administrator McCarthy talks with a nurse at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

 

We are united on improving the health of children suffering from asthma and respiratory problems aggravated by environmental factors.

I also had the pleasure of meeting Robenia Chambers.

Administrator McCarthy talks with Robenia Chambers and her son, Jeremiah.

Administrator McCarthy talks with Robenia Chambers and her son, Jeremiah.

 

She and her children suffer from asthma, but because of a home visit from the Asthma Prevention and Management Initiative, Robenia identified common asthma triggers in her home and she has improved the daily health of her children.

After, I was welcomed to Tufts Medical Center.

Administrator McCarthy is welcomed to Tufts Medical Center by CEO and President, Dr. Michael Wagner.

Administrator McCarthy is welcomed to Tufts Medical Center by CEO and President, Dr. Michael Wagner.

 

Tufts Medical Center works with the Boston Public Health Commission on asthma home visits to help residents create healthy living environments that support asthma prevention and control.

After hearing about their hard work and collaboration, it’s clear that this community understands what’s at stake:

Asthma rates in Boston are among the highest in the country. This is a public health burden that must be acted on @TuftsMedicalCtr

— EPA New England (@EPAnewengland) August 19, 2014

I also had an opportunity to participate in a public health home visit with the Tufts Medical Center’s Asthma Prevention and Management Initiative.

Administrator McCarthy meets Heyi Zhang and Eden Ling, a child who suffers from asthma

Administrator McCarthy meets Heyi Zhang and Eden Ling, a child who suffers from asthma

 

In Boston’s Chinatown district, we met with Heyi Zhang and her grandson, Eden Ling, who suffers from asthma.

Often asthma triggers exist in homes. Home visit education makes direct impacts on health and reducing asthma symptoms @TuftsMedicalCtr

— EPA New England (@EPAnewengland) August 19, 2014

I am incredibly proud of my hometown for all of their efforts to invest and cleanup the environment as well as improve the health of families in Boston.

(2/2) Thanks to @TuftsMedicalCtr @HealthyBoston, @MassEEA, city of Boston, @MassLeague, @LungAssociation & @MothersOutFront. #dayinthelife

— Gina McCarthy (@GinaEPA) August 19, 2014

 

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