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Use Mapping Tools to See TRI Where You Live

2016 January 21

If you’ve wondered what chemicals industrial facilities in your community are releasing into the environment, the TRI National Analysis can help you find out. The website features two interactive mapping tools for exploring TRI data in your area.

The Where You Live section gives you information about toxic chemical releases to the air, water, and land at the state, city, and ZIP code level. You can also use it to find TRI data for major U.S. watersheds and Tribal lands. You can also click on a specific location for a link to a detailed TRI factsheet.

We’ve also created a TRI Facilities and You story map that combines TRI data with Census data to give you more information about the locations of TRI facilities and the populations living nearby. You can see how many people live within a mile of a TRI facility, or explore the locations of TRI facilities in your county. You can also find out what percentage of the population near a facility is a minority or lives below the poverty line, and how those demographics differ in various areas of the country.

What you think of our interactive maps? What other information would be useful to include?

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Using TRI With Other Data

2016 January 21

TRI is a useful resource for learning about chemical releases to the environment or about how facilities are managing their chemical waste to prevent pollution. But TRI data can be even more powerful when combined with other types of data! The TRI and Beyond section of the 2014 TRI National Analysis highlights two examples.

In the first example, we combined TRI data with data about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from EPA’s GHG Reporting Program to create a more complete picture of a facility’s environmental performance. This section includes facilities that report to both TRI and the GHG Reporting Program, and provides information about the top industrial sectors and how releases of both TRI chemicals and GHGs have changed over time.

The next example shows how you can learn more about water pollution by combining TRI data with information from EPA’s Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs). Together, these datasets let us look more comprehensively at pollutant discharges to the nation’s surface waters.

There are lots of ways to combine TRI with other datasets. Tell us about how you’ve mashed up TRI data with other data—what were you trying to learn? Did you encounter any challenges? What would have made it easier for you?

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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2014 TRI National Analysis: New Features Highlight TRI Data

2016 January 21

EPA just published the latest TRI National Analysis, our summary and interpretation of public data about toxic chemicals managed by industrial facilities during the 2014 calendar year. The 2014 report includes several new features and analyses that we hope will help you better understand and use TRI data.

The biggest change is the new layout of the National Analysis website. A new landing page can quickly take you to the most popular parts of the report, TRI data for your community, and the National Analysis overview video. National-level “quick facts” and links to the report summary and archive of past years’ reports are also available from the homepage.

This year, we’ve included several new analyses in the report. Two of them focus on pollution prevention (P2) information, a very important aspect of the TRI Program. Estimated reductions in releases from P2 activities and barriers to implementing P2 both provide a more complete picture of P2 activities at industrial facilities. There’s also a case study of a facility that has been so successful in managing its chemical waste that it has become a “zero releaser.” In our industry sector profiles, we take a closer look at the automotive manufacturing sector and at federal facilities, which have to report to TRI regardless of their functions.

Please look through the new National Analysis and tell us what you think! What do you like or dislike about the report’s new format? Which of the analyses or report features did you find most valuable or informative? What would you like to see included next year?

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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New Web Series Highlights Pollution Prevention Accomplishments

2014 July 17

For many toxic chemicals and industry sectors, reported TRI releases have trended downward considerably in recent years.  In such cases, TRI’s Pollution Prevention (P2) Search Tool is a great resource for identifying the P2 activities or other environmentally-friendly practices that have contributed.

To spur discussion of these practices, we looked at how the metals industry reduced their use, waste generation, and releases of a recognized carcinogen (trichloroethylene). We examined the P2 information that fabricated metals facilities submitted to the Toxics Release Inventory, and also followed up with one of the facilities with the largest reductions to find out more about what they did.

Check out our findings in our first P2 Accomplishments Bulletin and let us know what you think. Should EPA offer more of these analyses? Which other chemicals and sectors are worth highlighting from the standpoint of P2?

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Help Us Improve Your Access to TRI Information

2014 May 12

EPA provides several different online tools and applications for accessing TRI data, such as TRI Explorer, myRTK, Envirofacts, and the TRI Pollution Prevention Search Tool. If you have used one of these tools before, how easy was it to find the information you were looking for? Which one of these tools best met your needs and why? Please describe any functions or features that would have improved your user experience, or any other suggestions you have for us.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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What Do You Want to See in the TRI National Analysis?

2014 February 4

We just published our annual TRI National Analysis report. It includes summaries, charts, graphs, interactive maps, and search tools to help you find out about industrial releases of toxic chemicals and pollution prevention activities at the national and local level. Which of these features have you used? Which did you find most valuable or informative? What new features or analyses would you like to see included next year?

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Welcome!

2013 July 10

Welcome to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program’s new discussion forum! We’ve set up this online forum to provide a place for TRI data users to talk to each other and to us in the TRI Program. It’s a place for you to share ideas about how to use TRI information, describe any problems you’ve had accessing or understanding the data, and let us know what’s working for you and what could be improved.

We encourage you to comment – your feedback will help us better understand your information needs and shape how we provide TRI data in the future.

New topics will be posted periodically; if there’s something you’d like to see discussed here, you can email us at tri.help@epa.gov with your suggestions.

Topic 1:

The TRI Program recently launched a new pollution prevention (P2) search tool to enable data users to access, visualize and analyze TRI’s P2 information. Have you used this tool? If so, does it help satisfy your particular data needs? What new features would you like to see added when we next update the tool? To learn more, please visit the TRI P2 webpage at www.epa.gov/tri/p2.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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