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Scientist at Work: Interview with Thomas Knudsen

2012 October 27

Dr. Tom Knudsen is a developmental systems biologist at EPA’s Center for Computational Toxicology. His research focuses on developing predictive models of developmental toxicity, building and testing sophisticated computer models such as the Virtual Embryo Project. This effort explores the potential for chemicals to disrupt prenatal development—one of the most important lifestages.

In addition to his research at EPA, Dr. Knudsen is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Louisville, Editor-in-Chief of the scientific journal Reproductive Toxicology, and Past-President of the Teratology Society.

Before joining EPA, he was Professor at the University of Louisville.

How does your science matter?

I am part of an exciting effort to develop new ways to explore development toxicology and prioritize the testing of chemicals using vast amounts of data and biological knowledge, powerful computers, sophisticated computer models and very large databases. Instead of the conventional approach to developmental toxicology, which over the past 50 years or so has relied on tests conducted on pregnant lab animals, we are developing virtual models that are both faster and less expensive.

For example, in the Virtual Embryo project we are using a suite of screening models that look at the interactions of various chemicals with the complex biology of a developing embryo. We think that these models and tools will be a new way of asking questions about how a pregnant woman’s exposure to chemicals in the environment might result in a risk to development.

Our work will help protect human health, greatly increase the number of chemicals we can screen quickly, and reduce costs all at the same time. So I guess it really does matter.

What do you like most about your research?

Most days I feel like I have the best job in the country!

The team that I work with consists of bright and exceptionally talented scientists, among them more than a half dozen outstanding young scientists and post-doctoral fellows. As a like-minded team, we strive to unravel complexity in a biological system such as the embryo.

I really enjoy the many opportunities for productive collaboration here at EPA. The opportunity to conceptualize the Virtual Embryo Project and see it grow and evolve has been most gratifying, not only because of the innovative science that it allows, but also because of the opportunities that it presents for professional development of young scientists.

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Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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One Response leave one →
  1. Arman.- permalink
    October 27, 2012

    All the Babies enjoy Exploring……

    Scientists are explorers,similar with the baby.It seems the future, the human should be a scientist consequences of environment.And people have known the others from various sources. Back to the nature, from baby until the adult would busy to explore, like a scientist………!

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