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This Week in EPA Science

2015 April 17

By Kacey FitzpatrickResearch recap graphic identifier, a microscope with the words "research recap" around it in a circle

April 18 marks the start of National Park Week and you can visit any of America’s National Parks for free this weekend! But before you get outside to enjoy the spring weather and the great outdoors, be sure to catch up on the latest EPA science.

Here’s what we’re highlighting this week.

  • Arrested (Watershed) Development
    In areas urban areas, a lot of rain water doesn’t get absorbed. Instead, it flows across the watershed, picking up pollutants and nutrients as it goes. EPA scientists helped address the growing concern for these pollutants by testing the waters in streams throughout the northeastern United States.
    Read more about their research in the blog It’s Arrested Urban Watershed Development
  • The White House Announces Actions to Protect Communities from the Impacts of Climate Change
    As part of the Administration’s overall effort to combat climate change and protect human health, the White House announced a series of actions to support improved understanding, communications, and reduce health impacts of climate change. EPA’s Village Green stations were specifically mentioned for “Improving Air Quality Data.” The efforts of the Challenging Nutrients Coalition, which launched the Visualizing Nutrients Challenge, were also highlighted in this announcement.
    Read the full announcement from the White House in this fact sheet.
  • Meet some of EPA’s amazing researchers
    Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be an environmental scientist? If so, check out these great videos that give an inside look at what EPA Ecologist Robyn Conmy and EPA Biologist Joe Ebersole do in the lab.
    Watch the videos on EPA’s YouTube Channel here:
    Faces of EPA: Robyn Conmy
    Faces of EPA: Joe Ebersole

Coming up next week:

  • Earth Day Seminar on Mega Trends
    April 22nd from 3 to 5 pm
    EPA is partnering with the World Environment Center and the Wilson Center to host an Earth Day seminar on Mega Trends — long term trends that will have the most profound impacts on society. Panelists will share their views on such topics as: projected trends and impacts from climate change; extreme weather; urban growth; and energy, land, and water use.
    Find out more about the event and how to attend in the blog Creating “Years of Sustainable Development”

If you have any comments or questions about what I share or about the week’s events, please submit them below in the comments section!

About the Author: Kacey Fitzpatrick is a student contractor and writer working with the science communication team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

It’s Arrested Urban Watershed Development

2015 April 16

By Annie Zwerneman

They say April showers bring May flowers – but what happens to the rain that doesn’t end up watering plants?

In areas where the natural vegetation has been replaced by buildings, pavement, and other types of human development, a good deal of that rain water doesn’t get absorbed. Instead, it flows across the watershed, picking up pollutants and nutrients as it goes. In large urban areas, the natural systems can quickly become overwhelmed, leading to trouble in the form of impaired water bodies downstream, increased erosion, and damaged ecosystems.

EPA interns sampling a stream near Providence, RI.

EPA interns sampling a stream near Providence, RI.

EPA scientists helped address the growing concern for these pollutants by testing the waters in streams throughout the northeastern United States. A team of EPA researchers, led by Nathan Smucker and Anne Kuhn, set out to understand how we can better manage pollution that negatively affects valuable freshwater resources.

Smucker, Kuhn, and their team selected sites to research that were evenly distributed throughout the heavily urbanized Narragansett Bay watershed. Specific sites were picked in order to capture a complete range of low to high development in watersheds that drain to the bay.

The science team focused on how important components of stream food webs and water quality were affected by urbanization. In conjunction with other EPA research in the region, they found that riparian vegetation was integral to reducing negative impacts on algae and macroinvertebrates associated with watershed development. Stream ecosystems and food chains are further impacted when riparian vegetation is destroyed by development or erosion. Their research showed that if vegetation buffers are maintained next to streams, some of the negative effects of watershed development can be reduced.

Results from the research and literature review analysis will provide insight into preventative actions for decision makers that are building or developing on watersheds and aid with managing stream resources in watersheds with existing development. By identifying how past development has affected stream ecosystems, we can predict what might happen as ongoing development occurs, and we can work proactively on strategies to keep ecosystems intact and pollution at bay.

About the Author: Annie Zwerneman is an intern for the EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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Creating “Years of Sustainable Development:” Anticipating and responding to Mega Trends

2015 April 16

By Dr. Alan D. Hecht and Barb Walton

Taking ActionLate last year, Columbia University economist Jeffrey Sachs pronounced 2015 the “Year of Sustainable Development,” reflecting the United Nations’ efforts to identify goals and agree on greenhouse gas emission targets for the decades ahead.

The increase in greenhouse gas emissions and anticipated yet unquantifiable impact on climate change is one of many major global trends that governments at all levels and corporations need to address.

The full suite of such “global mega trends” challenges all of us to find ways to achieve “years of sustainable development.” EPA, the World Environment Center and the Wilson Center are hosting an Earth Day seminar (April 22 from 3 to 5 pm) on Mega Trends to encourage discussion of the following:

  • What major long term trends (mega trends) will have the most profound impacts on society?
  • How can Government, business and civil society best prepare and respond to these trends?
  • What science and innovation would help reduce risk and prepare for the future?
  • What issues require public dialogue to improve policy decisions and promote better business-government cooperation?

Joining us to share thoughts and lead the discussion will be Jennifer Turner of the Wilson Center, Banning Garrett, adjunct faculty at Singularity University, and Terry Yosie of the World Environment Center.

Together, we will share our views on such topics as: projected trends and impacts from climate change; extreme weather; urban growth; and energy, land, and water use.

EPA has been leading the responsive to a number of such emerging issues, notably to climate change, the management of new chemical wastes such as endocrine disruptors and nanomaterials, the evaluation of biofuels, and the effectiveness of green infrastructure. Our Climate Change Adaptation Plan recognized drought as a major vulnerability to human wellbeing.

EPA has also launched new academic grants requesting proposals for new strategies to improve the Nation’s readiness to respond to the water scarcity and drought anticipated in response to climate change.

Working closely with other agencies, we are also sensitive to the stresses and interactions of energy demand and water use. Accordingly, the Agency has developed a set of principles and actions to advance energy-water use in a more sustainable way.

And on urban growth, EPA is attuned to the potential impact on human health and on disadvantaged communities. EPA has identified 51 communities where it will work to respond to past, present and future issue affecting society wellbeing.

The challenge of achieving sustainable development requires multiagency cooperation, business-government partnerships and full public understanding of the potential impacts.  To prepare for Earth Day in 2030 and for Years of Sustainable Development, we need to:

  • Set Clear Sustainability Goals
  • Focus on states, cities and communities
  • Promote business innovation
  • Support “Nexus” among government programs
  • Overcome traditional legislative silos in programs
  • Overcome business-government conflict and create effective collaborations and partnerships.
  • Be flexible and innovate within the existing legal framework.
  • Promote innovation in science and technology.
  • Enhance public understanding and support.

We and our partners are meeting those challenges. To learn more and join the discussion, I invite you to attend the Wilson center event in person or by video. For more information, please visit: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/promoting-years-sustainability-responding-to-mega-trends.

About the Authors: Alan D. Hecht is the Director for Sustainable Development at EPA. Barb Walton is the Assistant Laboratory Director for the Agency’s National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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This Week in EPA Science

2015 April 10

By Kacey Fitzpatrickresearch recap cherry blossoms

Will you be in Washington DC this weekend among the hundreds of thousands of tourists at the National Cherry Blossom Festival?

If so, you’re in luck! Just a short metro ride away is the 11th Annual EPA People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) student design competition for sustainability. Come to Oronoco Bay Park in Alexandria to take a break from the crowds and see some of these very bright student teams demonstrate their innovative designs.

Read about the competition and more in this week’s Research Recap.

  • Join us for a weekend of innovation
    The EPA P3 Competition is an annual event for teams of graduate and undergraduate students to design solutions for environmental and sustainability challenges. Over 40 teams from colleges and universities across the country will be showcasing their ideas for green technologies and competing for the EPA P3 Award and a Phase II grant of up to $75,000.
    Read more about the competition in the blog post Come See Innovation this Weekend!
  • How Dr. Ken Olden became a “Nifty Fifty”
    As the Director of EPA’s National Center for Environmental Assessment, Dr. Ken Olden now has the opportunity to address the issues he’s wanted to change since he was a kid. He recently shared his experience with students at the Capital City Public Charter School as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival’s “Nifty Fifty (times 4)”.
    Read his story in the blog You Can Make A Difference: How I Became a “Nifty Fifty”.
  • Going above and beyond to track blooms
    EPA has joined NASA, NOAA, and the U.S. Geological Survey to use satellite data to monitor algal blooms. The new multi-agency effort will build on previous NASA ocean satellite sensor technologies created to study the global ocean’s microscopic algal communities.
    Read about this exciting new partnership in the blog Tracking Blooms from the Sky.
  • Calling all data miners!
    Nutrient pollution is one the most expensive problems associated with aquatic environments. EPA, with U.S. Geological Survey and Blue Legacy International, has launched a competition looking for talented designers, coders, data scientists, sensor experts, and anyone interested in complex problems to analyze and organize existing nitrogen and phosphorus water pollution data.
    Read more about the competition in the blog Visualizing Our Waters.

If you have any comments or questions about what I share or about the week’s events, please submit them below in the comments section!

About the Author: Kacey Fitzpatrick is a student contractor and writer working with the science communication team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

You Can Make A Difference: How I Became a “Nifty Fifty”

2015 April 9

By Ken Olden, Ph.D.

 

EPA "Nifty Fifty" scientist Dr. Kenneth Olden

EPA “Nifty Fifty” scientist Dr. Kenneth Olden

Is there something in this world that you would like to see changed? Disease, hunger, health care—I believe we all have things we want to change. That desire for change is how I got to the position that I am in today.

I grew up on a farm along the Appalachian Mountains in rural Tennessee, among the worst poverty in the United States. We were poor, hungry, and I didn’t like the environment in which we lived. I looked around my community and I knew that if we wanted something to change, one of us would need to break out and become a leader. So I thought, why not me?

I decided then that I needed to work hard, go to college, and keep going until I acquired the education to become part of the leadership class. I shined shoes before and after school for 15 cents a pair—that’s how I paid for my first year of college.

I started at Knoxville College in 1956 and earned a B.S. in Biology. Then I earned a M.S. in Genetics from the University of Michigan. After that, I earned my Ph.D. in Cell Biology and Biochemistry from Temple University in 1970.

I made history when I became the first African American to direct one of the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Today, as the Director of EPA’s National Center for Environmental Assessment, I have a platform from EPA, one of the nation’s top environmental and health organizations, for addressing the issues and problems I’ve wanted to see changed since I was a kid.

Picture of Capital City Public Charter School

Capital City Public Charter School, Washington, DC.

Recently, I had the opportunity to share these experiences with students at the Capital City Public Charter School. I was asked to speak at the school as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival’s “Nifty Fifty (times 4)” program. The program is linking 200 noted science and engineering professionals with middle schools across the Washington, DC area. My fellow “Niftys” and I are sharing stories about our science and career paths throughout the current school year.

I asked the students if there was anything in the world they would like to see changed. One student wanted to change how people perceive hip-hop. Another wanted equality for women in the workforce. Every student agreed that there was something they wanted to see changed.

My question back to them was: “Why not you?”

You have your lifetime ahead of you to make a difference. Everything that has been discovered to date—it’s all just the beginning! There are just as many possibilities for discovery now as there was when I was in middle school. You can make those discoveries and you can make a difference.

I didn’t like seeing health disparity or people living in unhealthy environments when I was their age, and I wanted to change things. I set out in 1956 to make a difference and at 76, I can say I have lived a good life—I have had the opportunity to make a difference. Now it’s their turn.

About the Author: The Director of EPA’s National Center for Environmental Assessment, Dr. Ken Olden has published extensively in peer-reviewed literature, chaired or co-chaired numerous national and international meetings, and has been an invited speaker at more than 200 symposia.

Dr. Olden has won a long list of honors and awards including the Presidential Distinguished Executive Rank Award, the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award for sustained extraordinary accomplishments, the Toxicology Forum’s Distinguished Fellow Award, the HHS Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award, the American College of Toxicology’s First Distinguished Service Award, and the National Minority Health Leadership Award. From 1991-2005, he served as the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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Come See Innovation this Weekend!

2015 April 8

Cynthia Nolt-Helms

P3 Teams hold a sign "We Love P3!"

Come see the P3 teams show innovation this weekend!

Spring is here, and there is much to look forward to in Washington, DC! Besides enjoying cherry blossoms and sunnier weather, I look forward to innovation. Odd, I know. But along with the flowers and festivals, innovative green technologies come to the DC area, too. This coming weekend, April 11-12, EPA is sponsoring the 11th Annual EPA People, Prosperity and the Planet (P3) student design competition for sustainability.

The EPA P3 Competition is an annual event for teams of graduate and undergraduate students to design solutions for environmental and sustainability challenges. Some 250 students representing 42 teams from colleges and universities across the country will be showcasing their ideas for green technologies and competing for the EPA P3 Award and a Phase II grant of up to $75,000.

These creative students, passionate about promoting a sustainable world, already have competed in the first phase of this national contest. They won a Phase I grant of $15,000 to work on their project during the school year.

Through EPA’s P3 Program, the students demonstrate their ability to work in multidisciplinary teams, navigate competition requirements, and perhaps most importantly, communicate the value of their ideas to a broad range of people. From the judges convened by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to the school children who may visit their exhibits, the teams will be explaining how they are taking their innovations from the drawing board to the real world for the benefit of people, to promote prosperity and to protect the planet. That’s P3!

In the interest of fairness, I don’t want to highlight any one of the competing teams. But I do get to brag about the accomplishments of past EPA P3 winners we were able to support through the program. To date, 25 percent of award winning teams have gone on to start companies or form nonprofit organizations. Through the years, faculty have used the program to develop college-level courses in sustainability where none had existed before. Because they won an EPA P3 Award, students have received other awards, funding and recognition—from coveted fellowships to investment capital to international environmental awards.

Now we’re at the beginning of a new cycle of accomplishments for a new class of P3 teams. Spring is a time of promise, and this week brings a new crop of green technologies that we think hold promise. For me and the rest of the EPA P3 team, the expo is the fun part of our jobs!

We hope you will join us. Meet the teams. Learn something about the environment you didn’t know. Explore solutions with the students.

Every year we are amazed and inspired by them. We think you will be too!

11th Annual EPA P3 Competition at the National Sustainable Design Expo:

  • Saturday, April 11, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Sunday, April 12, 9:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Oronoco Bay Park, Alexandria, Virginia

About the Author: Cynthia Nolt-Helms has directed the P3 Program since 2006. A native of Oregon, she felt compelled from an early age to preserve the planet. Seeing public service as an opportunity to have a broad impact, she thought the EPA was a logical fit for her professional and personal goals. In 25+ years there, she has developed national wildlife criteria under the Clean Water Act and has led grant initiatives for clean water.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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Tracking Blooms from the Sky

2015 April 8

By Kacey Fitzpatrick

Image of a map created with the new app.

Water quality managers can drop location pins in their water bodies of interest and the pins change colors depending on user settings.

With help from partners, EPA is going above and beyond the agency’s traditional methods of monitoring harmful algal blooms in water. EPA has joined NASA, NOAA, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to use satellite data to monitor algal blooms and develop an early warning indicator system for toxic and nuisance blooms.

Algal blooms have caused extensive problems in lakes worldwide. We saw this in August, 2014 when half a million people living in and around Toledo, Ohio were issued a water advisory alerting them to avoid all contact with Toledo drinking water after a harmful algal bloom of cyanobateria in Lake Erie had produced unsafe levels of the toxin microcystin.

Blooms like these are becoming a more frequent occurrence and are having greater impacts than ever before. The estimated annual cost of U.S. freshwater degraded by harmful algal blooms is $64 million in additional drinking water treatment, loss of recreational water usage, and decline in waterfront real estate values.

The new multi-agency effort will build on previous NASA ocean satellite sensor technologies created to study the global ocean’s microscopic algal communities. EPA researchers will provide the science that links the current and historical satellite data on cyanobacteria algal blooms provided by NASA, NOAA, and USGS to monitor changes in the environment, assess economic impacts, and protect human health.

The first step in the five-year project will be creating a reliable, standard method for identifying cyanobacteria blooms in U.S. freshwater lakes and reservoirs using ocean color satellite data. NOAA and NASA have lead the way in using oceanic satellite data for monitoring and forecasting harmful algal blooms and EPA is integrating this data into the decision-making process.

Researchers will also conduct a large-scale investigation of potential causes of harmful algal blooms in U.S. freshwater systems. Blooms in lakes and estuaries result from aquatic plants receiving a combination of excess nutrients, perhaps from river runoff, and other environmental conditions such as temperature and light. Various land uses, such as urbanization or modernized agricultural practices, influence the amount of sediment and nutrients delivered in watersheds, which can influence cyanobacterial growth.

This innovative use of satellite data to monitor and report blooms throughout a region or state will help with management of events and significantly reduce risk to the public. Ultimately, this project will reduce the amount of resources needed to protect human health and the environment.

About the Author: Science writer and student contractor Kacey Fitzpatrick is a frequent contributor to It All Starts with Science.

 

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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Visualizing Our Waters

2015 April 7

By Dustin Renwick

“Data mining” conjures images of someone clanking away with a pick-axe at a mountain of 1s and 0s. But the sentiment isn’t far off. Heaps of data are useless without understanding the relevance and context within the larger picture.

Graphic showing swirling water with  words "Visualizing Nutrients" belowNutrient pollution is one the most expensive problems associated with aquatic environments. Excess nitrogen and phosphorus in water affects human health and the sustainability of ecosystems. Green water means increased risks for harmful algal blooms, hypoxia, and other nutrient-related water quality issues.

To help provide a clearer picture of this problem, 29 teams are now developing and testing affordable, real-time technologies for measuring nitrogen and phosphorus in water as part of our Nutrient Sensor Challenge. Yet those sensors will produce more data, ever increasing our need to make the numbers understandable to a larger audience beyond the scientists who study the measurements.

Today, with the U.S. Geological Survey and Blue Legacy International (a nonprofit focused on water), EPA launched Visualizing Nutrients. This innovation competition includes $15,000 in cash prizes.

We want talented designers, coders, data scientists, sensor experts, and anyone interested in complex problems to analyze and organize existing nitrogen and phosphorus water pollution data.

The best submissions will transform publicly available, open government data sets into dynamic visual representations that reveal insights, trends, and relationships. First Place will take home $10,000 and a People’s Choice Award will win $5,000.

Visit the competition website to submit a solution. The deadline is 11:59 p.m. on June 8, 2015.

This is one of many efforts by the broader Challenging Nutrients Coalition to bring innovative ideas and solutions to bear on the problem of nutrient pollution. The group consists of federal agencies, universities, and nonprofits.

About the Author: Dustin Renwick works in conjunction with the Innovation Team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

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This Week in EPA Science

2015 April 3

By Kacey Fitzpatrickresearch recap cherry blossoms

I think it’s safe to say that spring has finally sprung! The cherry blossoms are beginning to bloom here in Washington DC and all around the country baseball teams are gearing up for their season’s opener.

But before you head out to enjoy the warmer weather, be sure to check out this week’s Research Recap. Here’s the latest in EPA Science.

  • Which Ounces of Prevention?
    How do we predict which chemicals are toxic – and at which exposure levels? EPA STAR grantee Shane Hutson, an Associate Professor of Physics at Vanderbilt University, teamed up with colleagues to found VPROMPT – Vanderbilt-Pittsburgh Resource for Organotypic Models for Predictive Toxicology.
    Read more about these EPA STAR grantees in the blog Predictive Toxicology Using Organotypic Models
  • Greater Research Opportunities Fellowship Program
    This year marks more than 30 years that EPA has provided support to undergraduate students through the Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) Fellowship Program. EPA’s Georgette Boddie, the Program Manager for GRO, has worked with hundreds of Fellows to ensure that they have the support they need while in the program.
    Read more about the program in Georgette’s blog Thirty Years of Undergraduate Support.
  • FracFocus Report
    Only a few years ago, very little was known about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. Congress asked EPA to embark on a major effort to advance the state-of-the-science to accurately assess and identify those risks.
    Read more about the report in EPA Connect’s blog FracFocus Report: Helping us Paint a Fuller Picture.
  • The Future of Chemical Toxicity Testing
    EPA’s Science to Achieve Results grant program will provide research institutions with up to $6 million each to further develop organotypic culture models —“organ-on-a-chip” microsystems.  The grants support innovative research that will eventually model complex functions of the human system like metabolism, multicellular communication within a tissue or target organ, and how these multiscale systems change over time.
    Read more about this exciting research in the blog Organs-on-a-Chip.

If you have any comments or questions about what I share or about the week’s events, please submit them below in the comments section!

About the Author: Kacey Fitzpatrick is a student contractor and writer working with the science communication team in EPA’s Office of Research and Development.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Which Ounces of Prevention? Predictive Toxicology Using Organotypic Models

2015 April 2

By Shane Hutson

VPROMPT team members (left-to-right) Shane Hutson, Dmitry Markov, John Wikswo and Lisa McCawley. Photo courtesy of Vanessa Allwardt.

VPROMPT team members (left-to-right) Shane Hutson, Dmitry Markov, John Wikswo and Lisa McCawley. Photo courtesy of Vanessa Allwardt.

Everyone knows that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” but think about that saying’s application to environmental chemical exposure. There are tens of thousands of chemicals in common use. If we don’t prioritize that list, it quickly adds up to a few tons of prevention.

There is no doubt that prevention is the best medicine when you know exactly what needs to be prevented, but how do we know? How do we predict which chemicals are toxic – and at which exposure levels? Those questions are why I became involved in toxicology research.

For 40+ years, the gold standard for those questions has been expensive, time consuming, animal-based (primarily mice and rats) laboratory exposure studies where results are not clearly predictive of effects in humans. Are we stuck with such studies? A large number of scientists are working to answer that question with “No, we can do better.”

I became involved in this effort during a year at EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology. My interests lie in developmental toxicity – understanding how chemical exposures affect the developing fetus – so I worked with EPA researchers on the Virtual Embryo Project to build computational models of specific developmental events and how they go awry during chemical exposure. When combined with high-throughput screening efforts such as ToxCast, computational models do have some predictive ability. But we still have a lot to learn.

That brings me to my current efforts. I’ve teamed up with a talented group of colleagues at Vanderbilt and the University of Pittsburgh to found VPROMPT – Vanderbilt-Pittsburgh Resource for Organotypic Models for Predictive Toxicology.

The word “models” pops up again here, but these are not computational. VPROMPT is using diverse expertise in biology, chemistry, physics and engineering to grow “models” that are three dimensional assemblies of multiple human cell types in carefully perfused microfluidic chambers. Such models are designed to be “organotypic,” that is, matching the microenvironment that cells experience in a living organ. This will enable our model to more closely mimic human responses to chemical exposure.

Our plans focus on developmental toxicity with models for liver, mammary gland, developing limb, and fetal membrane. The latter is a key model for investigating chemicals’ links to preterm birth.

VPROMPT is just getting started. We have lots to do in terms of engineering, fabricating and validating our models, but we also have high hopes for their predictivity. Will they help us make sure we only need that reasonable ounce of prevention? Stay tuned and let’s see where the science takes us!

About the Author: Shane Hutson is an Associate Professor of Physics at Vanderbilt University and Deputy Director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research & Education.

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.