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A Heavenly Trio

2015 March 2

By Jim Haklar

I took this picture on February 20th from the back of the Edison Environmental Center. The Moon was near Venus (the bright “star” to the Moon’s left) and Mars (just above Venus). Think about the range of distances represented in this picture:

The trees were about 0.04 mile away;

The Moon was about 240,000 miles away;

Venus was 130 million miles away; and

Mars was 205 million miles away.

It’s sobering when you consider the scale of the solar system.

 About the Author: Jim is an environmental engineer at EPA’s Edison, New Jersey Environmental Center.  In his nearly 30 years with the agency he has worked in a variety of programs including Superfund, Water Management, Public Affairs, and Toxic Substances. He has been an amateur astronomer since he was a teenager, and can often be found after work in the back of the Edison facility with his telescope.

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Rediscovering the New York City Dinosaurs that Traveled Down the Hudson River.

2015 February 19

By Marcia Anderson

Photo by Bill Cotter

Photo by Bill Cotter

Back in 1964, my parents drove their pompano peach station wagon into NYC for my first memories of the Big Apple. They took me to the New York World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. I was nine years old.

For those who were not alive for the World’s Fair popular era (1791 through the 1960’s), they were huge expositions, where many countries sponsored exhibit buildings and companies showed off their latest technologies and upcoming products in futuristic exhibits. The New York World’s Fair featured 140 pavilions spread over 646 acres of land, and over 44 million people attended its exhibits in just one year.

Prior to the late 1930’s, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park was a swamp and ash dump immortalized as “a valley of ashes” in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.  The fair site originally consisted of ashes from coal-burning furnaces, as well as horse manure and garbage, and was known as the “Corona Ash Dumps.”  It was converted into the fair site, which is now known as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens. My mom and dad had visited the site almost 25 years prior to me, as children themselves, to the first NY World’s Fair in 1939-40.  That was the second largest American World’s Fair of all time. The 1964-65 exposition was the second World’s Fair in the same Queens location. Both World’s Fairs in New York (1939–40 and 1964–65) have the distinction of being the only two-year world expositions in history. World’s Fairs still exist, but not at the frequency and scale that they once were.

Photo by Bill Cotter

Photo by Bill Cotter

I still remember walking into the Sinclair Oil Corporation’s Dinoland exhibit. It featured life-size replicas of nine different dinosaurs, including an Apatosaurus (Brontosaurus) which took me back 65 million years and has remained with me ever since.The dinosaur exhibit was designed to point out the correlation between the petroleum deposits believed to have been formed at the time of the dinosaurs. The Brontosaurus is parodied in the Toy Story films as being the logo for the DinoCo gas station chain.  At the time of both NY World’s Fairs, the Sinclair Oil Corporation was a New York petroleum corporation.

How did the dinosaurs get to Queens? The Sinclair dinosaur statues were originally created for the 1939-40 World’s Fair and were later reused in the Primeval World diorama at Disneyland. The 1964-65 statues were created in Mahopac, New York and included a Tyrannosaurus rex, the horned Triceratops, the plated Stegosaurus and the lovable Apatosaurus. The dinosaurs took three years to build with a team of paleontologists, engineers and robotics experts who gave them life by integrating cutting edge animatronics.  Upon completion, the dinosaurs were barged 125 miles down the Hudson River to the site of New York’s World’s Fair. When the fair ended, their animatronics were removed and the dinosaurs were sent on a national tour which included the 1966 Macy’s Day Parade! A giant balloon of the Sinclair Dino appeared that year and continued to be a part of the parade until the late 1970’s.

I still have the brochure from the World’s Fair exhibit, Sinclair and the Exciting World of Dinosaurs, in a box in my attic, along with a replica ‘Dino.’  In hindsight, that exhibit had a tremendous impact on my life, so much so, that I eventually became a geology professor, teaching university students about the historical geology of our planet for 15 years. I still go fossil hunting whenever possible.

Photo by Bill Cotter

Photo by Bill Cotter

Where are the dinosaurs now? Is there really a Lost World? The dinosaurs were never lost, just relocated. The creatures were offered to the Smithsonian Institution, but were turned down. The dinosaurs were then retired and dispersed to different parks. While working for the EPA in Texas, I took a daytrip to Dinosaur Valley State Park in Glen Rose, TX, about 100 miles southwest of Dallas, to view dinosaur footprints.  Much to my amazement, I was also able to revisit my childhood dinosaur friends, Apatosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex. They were permanently put out to pasture in Texas, just like many of the nation’s racehorses. They are still around after over 65 million, plus four score years!

Photo by Marcia Anderson

Photo by Marcia Anderson

Where do the other New York World’s Fair dinosaurs reside? Triceratops is in the Museum of Science & Industry in Louisville, KY; Stegosaurus went to the Dinosaur National Monument in Jensen, UT; Corythosaurus is in Independence, KS; Ankylosaurus lives in the Houston, TX Museum of Natural Science; Struthiomimus went to the Milwaukee, WI Public Museum; and Trachodon lives in the Brookfield, IL Zoo. Sadly, Ornitholestes was stolen and never recovered.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Citizen Science is for the Birds?

2015 February 9

Every year since 1998, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society have teamed up in mid-February to sponsor the Great Backyard Bird Count.  It is recognized as “the first on-line citizen science project to collect data on wild birds.”  Since 1998, more than 100,000 people have participated and reported on the birds they see in their areas.  This year the bird count starts on Friday February 13th and continues through Monday February 16th.  The rules are simple – after you register on-line at gbbc.birdcount.org, you just count the numbers and types of birds you see for 15 minutes, on one or more of the 4 days!  There is a checklist on-line to use to report your results.  It’s also a great website to use to help identify birds you don’t recognize.

In 2014, people from 135 countries participated and reported almost 4,300 species of birds as more than 144,000 checklists were received. The results of last year’s bird count are really interesting and can be seen at gbbc.birdcount.org/news/top-10-lists/.

My wife and I have participated in the bird count for the last 7 years and some of the more colorful birds we have counted in our backyard are shown below (all photos courtesy of the Cornell Lab of Ornothology):

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

Bluejay

Bluejay

Purple Finch

Purple Finch

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal

Hope you can join us this weekend and if you can, Happy Birding!!!

About the Author: Kevin Kubik serves as the region’s Deputy Director for the Division of Environmental Science and Assessment out of EPA’s Edison Environmental Center.  He has worked as a chemist for the Region for more than 32 years in the laboratory and in the quality assurance program.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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A Chat About The Environment With Mike Richter

2015 January 28
Mike Richter, champion on the ice and environmental champion off the ice.

Mike Richter, champion on the ice and environmental champion off the ice.

By Jennifer May-Reddy

Mike Richter is best known as one of the most successful goalies in the National Hockey League. He retired in 2003 and  choose a different path – becoming partner at a private equity firm supporting companies in the environmental industry and launching Athletes for a Healthy Planet, an organization that makes the connection between a healthy planet and healthy athletes. Mike took time out of his busy schedule to talk with the EPA about why athletes and sports fans alike should care about the environment.

Q: Some people might not see an obvious nexus between sports and the environment. What do you think the connection or common thread is between sports and the environment?

A: As an athlete, I’ve been called an unlikely environmentalist but I think the environment is actually particularly relevant to athletes. Performance in sport is directly related to one’s health. The environment in which we live profoundly affects our health.

When it comes to global warming, the roots of my sport are far more affected than some other sports. The frozen ponds and lakes of North America where the sport was born freeze later and melt earlier lessening the opportunity to participate.  The “free ice” which is truly free – being able to bring your skates and just walk up and play – is going away. The great history of this old sport of kids skating down the St. Lawrence River or having a pond in their backyard where they didn’t need to pay to play because this was their arena is going away.  It is a shame.

Of course, so many aspects of our society are affected by pollution.  But there is a direct connection with sports.

All sports started outside in a fundamental way. Sport in its basic and best sense is a challenge with yourself. You don’t have to be on a team or in an aerobics class. You can actually go up a mountain and see if you can make it to the top.  That is an athletic feat. That is an athletic endeavor.  But if you don’t have the trails and you don’t have the clean water or the non-polluted air, you just don’t participate as much in sports.  Worse, if the local environment is compromised by pollution, it may actually be a hazard to your health.

Q: Can you talk a bit about how you got into the green movement? Were you involved in environmental causes when you were a player?

I don’t remember thinking of myself as an environmentalist. It was just on one level practical-don’t waste anything-food money, time.   On another, the concept fairness and social justice.

I grew up in Northwest Philadelphia in the city – it wasn’t an urban environment, it was more suburban but every adventure I had in the small woods behind my house or local farms, it might as well have been in the Grand Tetons.  It was incredible. We had sleep outs and tree forts, we found minnows and broke ice in the winter in the little creek behind my house.  It is such an enormously important part of life.

I do remember there was dioxin in the river that we used to play in and they would say you really can’t eat the fish out of there. Nothing lived. All from a photo-processing plant upriver. And so it is not theoretical even for little kids.  It is practical. It means that you can’t play in certain areas. It is taking away quality of life.  There is an enormous injustice in that which has always bothered me.

In my life, I also lived on the Upper West Side in New York and admired the West River. The fact you can’t take a fish out of there is a sad thing. And it doesn’t have to be that way. There have been great efforts to clean up the Hudson and it’s come a long, long way. But any 5 year old can tell you that throwing one’s garbage on another person’s house is just plain old wrong.  It is no different when people, corporations, or communities externalize their cost on another and pollute.

Being called an environmentalist is a funny thing.  It has been politicized and it shouldn’t be a political thing. I have friends who are conservative, liberal and everything in between. And they all want clean and functioning resources and healthy children and good health for themselves.

To me, if you live on this Earth, you are an environmentalist.  If you’re breathing, you want clean air and water. I think the questions is more “When did people stop identifying themselves as ‘pro-environment’?”

Q: What can fans or athletes do to be part of the “green sports” movement?

A: Most importantly, educate yourself.  Ignorance of the issues is the real villain here.  Become educated on the problems and available solutions, then implement them in your own life as much as possible.  Take public transportation, recycle, and purchase local food.  When these many excellent green sport programs are unveiled, show your team that it matters to you.  Finally, demand it of their teams, players as well as themselves.  Like any consumer, fans can reward those who move toward sustainability.

Q: In your experience, how are fans and players responding to green initiatives at venues?

People want clean water and clean air, clean energy, and sustainable alternatives to conventional products.  They just don’t want to pay more, have inferior performance, and more difficulty in making it happen. When you go to an arena with 60,000 people in it and there are only two recycling cans on the other side of an acre-long walkway, the fan may not make the effort to recycle the bottle.  It has to be easier.

Now, we see teams starting to understand environmental efforts. We have a long way to go, but they’ve come an enormous distance. You look at the recycling programs and public service announcements at games. Athletes are also starting to get more involved.  We’re in a different place that we were even a decade ago in terms of the acceptance and acknowledgement of it and possible solutions.  Arenas and teams are realizing that there is a more effective and efficient ways of running things. And as any person who runs a business knows, you can never be too efficient.  Where there is waste, you are losing money.

The NHL’s “Rock and Wrap It Up” campaign, where they take food that has been prepared but is unused and donate it is a great example of what the environmental movement should be focusing on.  In the end, we are talking about performance-less waste, smarter technology and design.

Q: Can you talk about the work you have been doing with Athletes for a Healthy Planet and other environmental organizations?

I believe that our problems with resource management are profound but recoverable.  We will need government, the capital markets and NGOs combined to address the challenges if we are going to be successful.  People are busy and there is a lot of information is out there but they want to do the right thing.

The environmental organizations I’ve worked with are comprised of ordinary people who care about their health, their kids and the future of their planet.  They’re not radical. They are very thoughtful and generous.  These projects need funding, science and volunteers. I believe very deeply in these organizations. Helping out with these organizations is one of the best gifts you can give back to society because everyone truly benefits from it.

Mike Richter is the founder and CEO of Healthy Planet Partners which finances energy infrastructure upgrades and renewables on commercial buildings. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for Riverkeeper locally and on the Sierra Club Foundation Board of Directors nationally. Mr. Richter enjoyed a successful 15 year career with the New York Rangers where he was a three time NHL All-Star and in 1994 led the New York Rangers to their first Stanley Cup Championship in 54 years. Mr. Richter also represented the United States on numerous international competitions including three Olympic teams, earning World Cup gold in 1996 and an Olympic Silver Medal in 2002. After retiring, Mr. Richter enrolled in Yale University and received his degree in Ethics, Politics, and Economics with a concentration in Environmental Policy.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Hmmm – Superfund – What is That?

2015 January 22
EPA Region 2 Superfund Director Walter Mugdan explaining the Superfund process from site listing to site deletion.

EPA Region 2 Superfund Director Walter Mugdan explaining the Superfund process from site listing to site deletion.

By Cecilia Echols

Wow, what an experience! Not long ago, EPA Region 2 tried something brand new. Nearly 60 people attended the EPA Superfund Symposium – “Engaging Brooklyn and Queens” – at the Brooklyn Borough Hall Community Room.  This symposium was the first of its kind, blending stakeholders from various neighborhoods to talk about Superfund in their communities.

The goal for this first-time event was to provide a roadmap for cleanups at three hazardous waste sites that have interlocking neighborhoods within Brooklyn and Queens. The sites are Wolff Alport Chemical Company in Bushwick/Ridgewood; Newtown Creek in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Long Island City and Maspeth; and, Gowanus Canal in Red Hook, Carroll Gardens, Gowanus and Park Slope.

Walter Mugdan, our Superfund Director, helped kick it off by explaining the Superfund process from site listing to site deletion. Each of these sites is at a different stage in the cleanup process and they are all impacted by a wide range of contaminants. Recognizing that Superfund cleanups may appear to be a complicated and arduous process, Walter explained the technical steps in an understandable, step-by-step fashion.

In terms of contaminants, Wolff Alport has the presence of thoron and radon gas; indications of an on and off-site spread of residual radioactive materials. Newtown Creek is contaminated with pesticides, metals, PCBs, and volatile organic compounds, which are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. The Gowanus Canal, considered one of the most polluted water bodies in the nation, has been polluted for years by industrial waste discharges, storm water runoff and sewer overflows. Other contaminants include PCBs, coal tar wastes, heavy metals and volatile organics.

Here I am (seated, facing the camera) listening to a community member discuss what it's like working with the EPA.

Here I am (seated, facing the camera) listening to a community member discuss what it’s like working with the EPA.

Michael Sivak, an EPA Risk Assessor, explained in an equally understandable way, the four-step process that is used to assess site-related human health risks – namely, what chemicals are in the soil, groundwater, air and surface water and how we are impacted and exposed to them, in the short and long-term. Additionally, four Community Involvement Coordinators presented, including Melissa Dimas, Wanda Ayala, Natalie Loney and myself. Our portion touched on elements of what we call the “community involvement toolkit,” consisting of Social Media, the Superfund Job Training Initiative, Technical Assistance Grants, Technical Assistance Services for Communities, EJ Screen, MY Environment and Community Advisory Groups (CAGs).

One of the most invaluable components of the Symposium, was a discussion led by two community members. Phillip Musegaas, representing Newtown Creek and Lizzie Olesker, representing the Gowanus Canal discussed how a CAG works for their particular site and mentioned what it is like working with EPA. Their candor and experience was very helpful and it spearheaded a lively conversation with other CAG members, homeowners, partner agencies, local business representatives and non-governmental organizations. A number of elected officials participated as well.

I was delighted with the turnout, and all of the hard work in planning this event paid off. I personally want to thank Borough President Eric Adams for the use of the space. I am pretty sure many more conversations will continue about the EPA’s role in cleaning up Wolff Alport, Newtown Creek and the Gowanus Canal.

http://www.epa.gov/region02/superfund/npl/gowanus/

http://www.epa.gov/region02/waste/wolff/index.html

http://www.epa.gov/region02/superfund/npl/newtowncreek/

http://www.epa.gov/superfund/community/toolkit.htm

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Oyster Bay Goes Green with New Rain Garden

2015 January 15
The newly installed rain garden at Oyster Bay’s Western Waterfront will capture, treat, and infiltrate polluted stormwater runoff before entering nearby Oyster Bay, and eventually Long Island Sound. Photo credit: Amy Mandelbaum, New York Sea Grant/ Long Island Sound Study.

The newly installed rain garden at Oyster Bay’s Western Waterfront will capture, treat, and infiltrate polluted stormwater runoff before entering nearby Oyster Bay, and eventually Long Island Sound. Photo credit: Amy Mandelbaum, New York Sea Grant/ Long Island Sound Study.

By Amy Mandelbaum and Mark A. Tedesco

Did you ever stop to think where water goes after it leaves your downspout? If you’re like most people, once stormwater is out of sight, it’s out of mind. Most likely, the stormwater rushes down your driveway, onto the street, and to the nearest storm drain. If you don’t live in the Big, I mean, Green Apple, then that drain goes directly to your local waterway, whether it be a lake, creek, river, bay, estuary, or even the ocean. So, what’s the big deal?

Well, that stormwater isn’t so clean by the time it makes it to your local waterway, as it picks up litter, nutrients, and plenty of other things along the way. This polluted stormwater runoff goes directly into the water without having a chance to be cleaned.

So, what can we do about it? That’s where green infrastructure comes into play. Green infrastructure is essentially mimicking what nature did before we started building gray infrastructure, such as gutters, roads, pipes, etc. Out of the many green infrastructure practices, one of the best for filtering polluted stormwater runoff is a rain garden: a shallow, vegetated basin that captures, treats, and infiltrates polluted stormwater runoff within a day. It is designed to treat the first inch of rain, which is the most polluted, and the plants, soil, and mulch filter the polluted stormwater runoff before it enters your local waterway.

The Town of Oyster Bay realized the need to redirect the polluted stormwater runoff from the roadway along the waterfront before going into nearby Oyster Bay, a Long Island Sound Stewardship Area, and eventually Long Island Sound. The Town sought and received a Long Island Sound Futures Fund grant to install a rain garden, all while educating the local community. The rain garden was installed in October, with assistance from other local organizations and volunteers. As part of the project, a corresponding rain garden training program is also offered for homeowners, municipal officials, and landscape professionals. This rain garden now serves as a demonstration to the local community and its visitors of a green infrastructure practice that can be easily incorporated into the landscape.

So, the next time it rains, I hope you take a closer look at your downspout.

If your town would like assistance mitigating the effects of stormwater runoff, contact your local Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) office in New York or Connecticut.

 About the Authors: Amy Mandelbaum is the New York Outreach Coordinator for the Long Island Sound Study. She works for New York Sea Grant in Stony Brook, NY. She received her Ed.M. in science education in 2012 and a B.S. in environmental science in 2007 from Rutgers University.

Mark Tedesco is director of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Long Island Sound Office. Mr. Tedesco is responsible for supporting implementation of a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Long Island Sound, approved in 1994 by the Governors of New York and Connecticut and the EPA Administrator, in cooperation with federal, state, and local government, private organizations, and the public. Mr. Tedesco received his M.S. in marine environmental science in 1986 and a B.S in biology in 1982 from Stony Brook University.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Upcoming Symposium in New York City: Breast Cancer and the Environment

2015 January 8
Environmental contaminants may contribute to diseases such as breast cancer.

Environmental contaminants may contribute to diseases such as breast cancer.

By John Martin

One way EPA scientists help protect public health is by analyzing the health effects that may result from exposure to environmental contaminants. A particular area of interest for our scientists, and for scientists across the U.S. and the world, has been chemicals’ potential to cause various types of cancer.

On January 12, 2015, the Children’s Environmental Health Center and the Dubin Breast Center at Mount Sinai hospital here in New York City will be hosting a symposium entitled “Breast Cancer and the Environment.” The symposium will feature a distinguished panel of speakers who will be discussing current research and what it is saying about the connections between environmental factors and breast cancer risk.

To register for this free event, and to get more info on topics and speakers, visit: http://conta.cc/1wFzT2A

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Think About the Environment this Holiday Season: Holiday tips from EPA’s Regional Administrator

2014 December 18

By Judith Enck

Holiday themed LED lights are a great compromise

Holiday themed LED lights are a great compromise

When I was a kid, growing up in Greene County New York, my beloved father won contests for the large number of lights that he put on our house. I would note that entire power plants had to run in order to keep the Enck family house illuminated, so I’m now doing my penance with LED lights. There really is no excuse to double your electric bill or blow your budget around the holidays, so here are my tips for a more environmentally friendly season.

  • Remember to support local businesses whenever possible
  • Consider a small live indoor tree or plant that can serve as a holiday tree to be decorated year after year.
  • If you opt for a real tree, be sure to compost it after the season is over.
  • Decorate with LED lights and colorful reusable ornaments that don’t require electricity such as (reusable) ribbons.
  • Reuse wrapping paper or use old comics to wrap gifts.
  • Try not to buy unnecessary consumer products. Give experiences instead like tickets to plays or concerts as a way to spend time together.
  • Hosting a big event? Remember to stick to reusable plates and glasses to cut down on unnecessary waste.
  • Plan ahead for meals and parties so you don’t buy more than you need.
  • More tips here.

Feel free to add your own suggestions in the comments section. Best wishes for a wonderful and sustainable holiday season and a very green new year!

This post was originally published to Greening the Apple during the 2011 holiday season.

About the author: Judith Enck is EPA’s Regional Administrator of and a native New Yorker who currently resides in Brooklyn.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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A is for Ant:  Keeping Ants Out of the Classroom (Part 2)

2014 December 11
Close-up of ant feeding.

Close-up of ant feeding.

By Marcia Anderson

The Benefits of Ants in classrooms. Ants have been observed and documented as good examples for humans for their hard work and cooperation since the dawn of history. Lessons abound in literature, such as: The Ant and the Grasshopper, one of Aesop’s Fables and they are in Hopi mythology. More recent literature includes: A Tramp Abroad, by Mark Twain, Departmental by Robert Frost, The Once and Future King by T.H. White and H.G. Wells’ The Empire of the Ants.

Kids easily relate to ants, just think about all of the 3-D animated films that have been produced: Antz, A Bug’s Life, The Ant and the Aardvark and Atom ant. Can you recall playing the award winning video game Sim Ant in the early 1990s? Many other games and science fiction insectoids have followed since. However, other than in literature, history, mathematics and art, ants are best kept outdoors.

In an earlier blog, I presented information on keeping ants out of the classroom schools and the importance of a smart, sensible, and sustainable approach for their management known as Integrated Pest Management or IPM.  Here are some additional tactics to round out a good ant IPM plan:

Sanitation. Sanitation eliminates the food that ants need to survive. Get rid of their food and you get rid of the ant problem. If children regularly receive meals in classrooms, those floors should be vacuumed and/or mopped daily. Make sure that all sinks are drained and clean by the end of the day. Periodically give all food preparation areas an all-inclusive cleaning, focusing on areas where grease and food debris accumulate. These include drains, vents, stoves, and hard-to-reach areas behind or between appliances. At the end of each day, remove all garbage containing food from the building.

Ants follow pheromone trails and reinforce them as they walk.

Ants follow pheromone trails and reinforce them as they walk.

Proper Food Storage. An ant infestation may indicate a need to change current methods of storing food or food waste. All food should be kept in the refrigerator or stored in pest-proof containers with lids that close tightly. As soon as food arrives in the building transfer it into clear plastic or glass containers. Do not leave food in cardboard boxes and paper as they are not ant or roach-proof. Outdoor refuse containers should be emptied and washed regularly and recyclables should be cleaned before storage.

How are ants able to follow one another around?  They leave pheromone trails as they walk and each ant reinforces the trail as they head back to the colony with food.  Detergent and water is an easy and safe way to eliminate this trail and the ant followers. When ants invade a classroom or food preparation area, an emergency treatment is detergent and water in a spray bottle. This mixture will quickly erase the trail and immobilize the ants. They can be wiped up with a sponge and washed down the drain.

For tougher problems, where non-chemical methods haven’t solved the problem, integrating ant baits, traps or other low-impact pesticides into your management program may be warranted. For information on ant control in schools go to: http://www.sites.ext.vt.edu/schoolipm/ipmtechniques/documents/ants.pdf .

About the Author: Marcia is with EPA’s Center of Expertise for School IPM in Dallas, Texas. She holds a PhD in Environmental Management from Montclair State University along with degrees in Biology, Environmental Design, Landscape Architecture, and Instruction and Curriculum. Marcia was formerly with the EPA Region 2 Pesticides Program and has been a professor of Earth and Environmental Studies, Geology, and Oceanography at several universities.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Sparking an Interest in Science

2014 December 4

 By Jim Ferretti

Jim Kurtenbach from EPA demonstrates collection of stream water quality parameters.

Jim Kurtenbach from EPA demonstrates collection of stream water quality parameters.

In its 19th year, the Green Horizons Conference on Careers in Natural Resources and the Environment for Middle Schools is an annual event that introduces middle school students to careers in science. Green Horizons is part of the Environmental Education Advisory Council of New York City. The Green Horizons Conference is rotated among the five boroughs of New York City and includes environmentally diverse locations such as Central Park, Brooklyn Botanical Garden, New York Botanical Garden and Queens Botanical Garden. This year the event was held on October 16, 2014 at the Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

A total of 163 students from various middle schools throughout Staten Island had the opportunity to select two science disciplines from over 19 stations established throughout the Snug Harbor complex in areas ranging from land planning, composting, entomology, natural resource restoration, and plant propagation. There were over 50 professionals and educators involved in this year’s outdoor conference. Nancy Wolf from the Magnolia Tree Earth Center of Bedford-Stuyvesant, Inc. is the coordinator for this program and touts many benefits for the kids, but the overriding one is the opportunity to introduce young people to all of the different types of careers in science. All of the stations were geared towards hands-on demonstrations and applications of a diverse collection of science and natural resource topics.

EPA employees participated this year with a station on water quality and a stream insect community demonstration which included hands-on measurement of basic water quality parameters and the ability to identify aquatic insects (and an American eel) obtained from sampling a stream at Snug Harbor (eventually flows into the Kill Van Kull). The students were amazed at this complex ecosystem right below the rocks of a small wadeable stream.

About the Author: Jim Ferretti is a team leader for the Sanitary Chemistry and Biology Team for the Laboratory Branch in the EPA’s Division of Environmental Science and Assessment. He has a Master’s Degree in Environmental Science from Rutgers University and a BS Degree in Water Analysis Technology from California University of PA. Jim has a diversified background in environmental studies and biological laboratory testing. He has been employed at the EPA since 1990, starting out in the water program in headquarters and moving to New Jersey in 1992.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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