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A World That We Want

2012 October 17

Further back than we can comprehend, forces were at hand creating every particle that makes up our bodies. Those same forces were creating each element that sustains us. Somewhere along the line, conditions were perfect. For the elements of our planet and the particles of our cells came together, giving us a chance for life on Earth.

How easily we forget this opportunity. How quickly we can lose sight of this delicate balance we now play a part in. Sometimes, it takes gazing light years away to be reminded.

As described in today’s Wall Street Journal, a planet the size of Earth was recently found “circling a star right next door—25 trillion miles away. But the Earthlike planet is so hot its surface may be like molten lava. Life cannot survive the 2,200 degree heat of the planet, so close to its star that it circles every few days.

The astronomers who found it say it is likely there are other planets … a little farther away where it may be cool enough for water and life. And those planets might fit the not-too-hot, not-too-cold description sometimes called the Goldilocks Zone.”

We live in this Goldilocks Zone. Our water can be fresh and pure to support our bodies’ needs; our oceans just the right acidity to support marine life; the air we breathe just the right combination of nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases; our soils can contain just the right amount of minerals and nutrients to grow our food.

Every day, we make choices that affect this balance. Our individual choices collectively create the world we live in.

Travel choices of our past through Documerica. Share sustainability as you see it, with State of the Environment.

“Central expressway leading south into Dallas. Photo by Bob Smith for Documerica, May, 1972

Central expressway leading south into Dallas. Photo by Bob Smith for Documerica, May, 1972

Abandoned automobiles and other debris clutter an acid water and oil filled five acre pond. It was cleaned up under EPA supervision to prevent possible contamination of Great Salt Lake and a wildlife refuge nearby. Photo by Bruce McAllister for Documerica, April, 1974.

Abandoned automobiles and other debris clutter an acid water and oil filled five acre pond. It was cleaned up under EPA supervision to prevent possible contamination of Great Salt Lake and a wildlife refuge nearby. Photo by Bruce McAllister for Documerica, April, 1974.

Gabriel Antor, left, and Nickolas Seeger, right, sit and wait for a tree to be planted at the Langley Air Force Base, Va., child development center, April 25, 2012. The tree, which could live hundreds of years if properly cared for, was planted in honor of National Arbor Day. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton/Released.

Gabriel Antor, left, and Nickolas Seeger, right, sit and wait for a tree to be planted at the Langley Air Force Base, Va., child development center, April 25, 2012. The tree, which could live hundreds of years if properly cared for, was planted in honor of National Arbor Day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarad A. Denton/Released.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed in Greenversations are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

2 Responses
  1. Master Melvin M. Lusterio permalink
    October 18, 2012

    The Good Force be with you!

    The World that we want is our own New Earth. We only need to improve, beautify and make it clean for good.

    Live forever and prosper!

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