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Suggest an idea for an app

2012 November 30

Last summer people suggested over 100 ideas for green apps in the Apps for the Environment Challenge. We narrowed the list down to 70 ideas for green apps that are not repeats and we want you to tell us which ones developers should make into apps. If you have ideas for apps or you want to provide more detail about these ideas, just write them in the space below.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Suggest an existing green app

2012 November 30

We’ve found a lot of green apps that you can use now.  Please suggest an existing green app that we could add to the My Green Apps website. Please read this disclaimer about links to third-party apps so you can see the criteria we use to include apps on the site.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

At your (data) service

2012 May 21

We really want to make it easy for developers to make great green apps. Check out these data services and share how you might use them to make apps.

1. EPA has developed a RESTful data service API to the data holdings in the Envirofacts database. Envirofacts is a centralized data warehouse that provides access to EPA’s major databases. The new data service API provides users with the ability to query any table in Envirofacts through the use of a URL. The default output is in XML, which can be utilized in other applications and in tools such as Microsoft Excel or Access. You can also output the data in CSV and Excel formats by adjusting the URL. The entire Envirofacts database metadata is available online, so all tables and columns within Envirofacts are documented. Having the table structures available in this manner makes most of Envirofacts data easily available through the service. Try out the Envirofacts data and the RESTful service API and send us your feedback.  If you’re already using the API in your application, please let us know.

2. The Federal Communications Commission has listed 25 developer resource hubs from across the federal government at http://www.fcc.gov/developers. We’ve included the entire list here as well:

3. But wait, there’s more! Brighter Planet created greendreams to accelerate the burgeoning green app developer community. A great number of environmental APIs have emerged, but it’s not always clear exactly what they’re for or how to use them. The greendreams app shows how to construct a request and executes it live in the browser, so you can see how it works end to end. The project is open source and they’re actively adding additional APIs.

Check them out and tell us what you think!

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Bring out your green apps!

2012 April 23

There’s still a lot of activity around green apps. If you’re interested in trying out some of them, check out what’s available from recent hack-a-thons and challenges. You can also vote for your favorite app in the Apps for Climate challenge. Check out all of these opportunities and tell us what you think!

If you’re a developer, designer, or environmental expert, consider entering the Apps for Energy challenge. Or just see the great work by your peers at hack-a-thons and challenges.

Recent and upcoming hack-a-thons

EcoHack NYC: This meet-up brought together a diverse community of scientists, hackers, designers and hobbyists that are interested in everything environmental. They even teamed up with The Public Laboratory to add a hardware-hacking component. April 21-22 in New York City

CleanWeb Hackathon: A series of gatherings to demonstrate the impact of applying information technology to resource constraints. The goal is to build apps and hacks exploiting new sustainable business models while leveraging the mobile and social web. January 21-22 in New York City, May 4 in Boston, and more locations and dates!

Apps for Energy by the U.S. Department of Energy

The U.S. Department of Energy is challenging developers and designers to come up with the best use of Green Button downloadable energy usage data. The details are at http://appsforenergy.challenge.gov, but the short version is that they’re offering $100,000 in prizes for the best applications that help utility customers understand their electricity usage and make better-informed decisions. Submissions are due by May 15. For more details, please contact Matthew Loveless at apps@hq.doe.gov.

Apps for Climate challenge by the World Bank

The World Bank’s Apps For Climate is a competition to discover extraordinary ways to use open data to address the challenges of climate change. Submissions are in, so you have until April 27, 2012 to vote for your favorite app (you must register to vote). Winners will receive cash prizes and featured placement on the World Bank Open Data website.

Have you tried all of the 38 submissions to the Apps for the Environment Challenge? They’re designed for you! Follow the action on Twitter at #greenapps.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.