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Let's Talk!

By Jessica Orquina

I’m the Social Media Lead for EPA. It’s my responsibility to lead EPA’s efforts to share information and communicate using social media. I work with my colleagues to make it possible for you to learn about our work on Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, Flickr, YouTube, and our blogs.

On Facebook and Twitter we share information that you can use to protect your environment. Like or follow us and receive tips you can use every day or to learn about the environment. On Foursquare we post tips at locations across the country and around the world. Check in at Olympic National Park in Port Angeles, WA or Rockport Harbor in Rockport, MA and see Documerica photos taken at those locations 40 years ago. EPA employees share their experiences and ideas with you on our blogs. Read about environmental tips, how EPA uses science to protect the environment, environmental justice, and many other EPA programs. We even have a Spanish blog! Check out our YouTube and Flickr stream to see photos and video of the work we have been doing.

We hope you find the information we share and the conversations that result interesting and useful. And we’re always trying to improve what we do

This is where you come in… What can we do better? Where do you want to connect with EPA online? What type of information would you like us to be sharing with you via social media?

Share your ideas and help us make this conversation more valuable. Tell us what you think in the comments below!

About the author: Jessica Orquina works in the Office of External Affairs and Environmental Education as the social media lead for the agency. Prior to joining EPA, she served as a public affairs specialist at another federal agency and is a former military and commercial airline pilot. She lives, works, and writes in Washington, DC.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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A Peanut Fueled World

A few days ago, I stumbled across the EPA’s YouTube Channel, and learned about peanuts. Yea, I know. What could the peanut surprise us with now?

Well, two college students have found a way of producing peanut shell briquettes to replace wood as a cooking fuel in rural Gambia in Africa. Gambia is facing significant deforestation, so wood is scarce.  However, peanut shells may be the answer.

Want to know how?  Watch their video demonstration at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqHqdrW6U_U&feature=plcp&context=C49bba42VDvjVQa1PpcFPdEiR2Xqqsvb0l5CWjfB8rYVRgIVpF3qM%3D

Yvonne Gonzalez is a SCEP intern with the Air and Radiation Division in Region 5.  She recently received a dual graduate degree from DePaul University.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Celebrate Earth Day 2009

About the author: Lisa Jackson is the EPA Administrator

image of Administrator Jackspon standing next to a child on a bikeToday, we’re celebrating the biggest Earth Day in history. One billion people – almost one in every six people on the planet – will stand up to show that protecting the Earth and those who live on it is our responsibility. How amazing is that?

This Earth Day, EPA is on the job, and working hard to protect human health and the environment. But we need your help.

Our web folks have updated our EPA page with a special Earth Day Pick 5 for the Environment Project. We provide 10 activities. You pick 5 and commit to doing them.

Once you get started on your Pick 5, you can share your stories in Facebook, photos on Flickr, and videos on YouTube. We’ll also have special blog posts here in Greenversations where you can talk about how you’re doing and help each other.

This is a defining moment. Some of the best opportunities we’ll ever have to make a change and save our planet are happening right now. The actions we take – or don’t take – are going to affect what happens today and for generations to come. That is our reality right now. But, there is plenty we can do.

We really can show that environmental protection and economic growth work hand in hand. We don’t have to choose between a strong economy and a clean environment, we just have to be smart enough to work for both. That will open the way to millions of green jobs in a low-carbon economy.

We really can lead the world in clean, homegrown energy sources, cutting emissions in the air, lowering energy costs for families, businesses and government, and ending, once and for all, our dependence on foreign oil. It’s a way to make the world not only cleaner but safer.

And we really can stop the rapid advance of climate change. We should be responsible enough to leave the world a better place for our children and grandchildren. But it takes a commitment from all of us.

Grow the economy. Strengthen our national security. Save our planet in the bargain. It sounds ambitious – because it is. But it’s a future that’s within our sights.  All we have to do is help each other to get there.

Okay I have to plug our project one more time. Visit http://www.epa.gov/pick5 to join our Pick 5 for the Environment Project and be part of the one billion people taking action this Earth Day.

We can do more to protect our communities and our planet than ever before. It’s up to you.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.