spanish

Personal Memories During National Hispanic Heritage Month

The author and his family.

The author and his family.

By Elias Rodriguez

America is presently engaged in National Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from September 15 to October 15. Latino cultural pride is a diverse, multifaceted and nonpartisan experience. This national period of reflection and events began in 1968 under President Lyndon B. Johnson and was broadened by President Ronald Reagan in 1988.

To remember and honor my Latino ancestors during this festive period, I’m sharing a family photo that captures the affection, energy and delight of family life in my distinct Puerto Rican clan.

My father and mother migrated to Nueva York from Santurce and Canovanas, Puerto Rico in the 1950s. They met at church on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and the rest is history. In this photograph, taken in NYC, circa 1970s, the restless niño on my grandfather’s lap is me. Anchoring the family portrait is my beloved mother and maternal grandparents surrounded by my two sisters, four brothers, one aunt and an infant cousin. True to form, dad was absent during the photo shoot and at work after which he probably brought home from the local bodega: groceries, treats and, on one memorable occasion, a live rooster. The latter did not last long in a Manhattan apartment building and was promptly converted into a delicious stew.

A few short years after this photo, I experienced my first visit to Puerto Rico. Treasured memories of my abuelo and abuela include hearty meals of rice, beans, pork and freshly picked vegetables from our ancestral home; the luscious taste of leche fresca straight from cows milked early in the day; and the absolute recognition that the only way to address my grandparents was in a low, respectful tone, and in Spanish, their sole language.

Fortunately, my forbearers also left behind the legacy of a healthy respect for the Earth, an admiration for nature, and a commitment to responsible stewardship. Their enduring message is that every natural resource is a divine blessing and should be managed with wisdom, generosity and cooperatively. My abuelitos taught my family to respect the planet because it will outlast us, never litter because this is where we live, never be wasteful because every resource is cherished, and always be grateful for our days are few before we too are a memory.

About the Author: Elias serves as EPA Region 2’s bilingual public information officer. Prior to joining EPA, the proud Nuyorican worked at Time Inc. conducting research for TIME, LIFE, FORTUNE and PEOPLE magazines. He is a graduate of Hunter College, Baruch College and the Theological Institute of the Assembly of Christian Churches in NYC.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Celebrating Diversity

By Elias Rodriguez

February is National African American History Month and I’ve been reflecting on my distinctly mixed heritage as a Nuyorican. Before relocating to New York City, my immediate forbearers were both born on the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico or Borinquen, as the natives originally referred to it. Although born in the Big Apple, it wasn’t until I lived in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico that I discovered the wide diversity of colors, shapes, shades and hair texture of my extended family and related cousins. From ebony to ivory from brown-eyed to green-eyed, the genetic mixture of my family was both wondrous and intriguing to behold. You see, Puerto Ricans benefit from un Sancocho (a stew) of African, Spanish and Taíno bloodlines. When the Spanish conquistadores arrived they encountered the island’s friendly Taínos who spoke Arawakan, the most commonly known native tongue of all South American and Caribbean natives at that time. As generations passed, the peoples mixed and a prodigious progeny was birthed.

My aunts, uncles and grandparents were light skinned, dark skinned and somewhere in between. They were equally beloved and I always asked for their Bendición (blessing). I proudly derive a crucial part of my identity from this generic diversity and rich tradition. My second language is Spanish and I thoroughly enjoy listening to Salsa music with its unmistakable African beat. The nexus between island natives and Africans is historically significant. Who could have looked at the great late Roberto Clemente and not assumed he was black? The famous fort San Felipe del Morro was built with slave labor. Juan Garrido, who made landfall in 1508, is believed to be the first person of African descent to voluntarily arrive on the island when he arrived with Juan Ponce de Leon. The Espiritismo practiced by my maternal grandmother was surely influenced by traditions from across the Atlantic. One look at my childhood photographs and I can surmise that my mother’s taste for dressing me in psychedelic clothes did not come from the Plymouth Rock pilgrims.

The threads of African culture within my own heritage are enriching and enhance my awareness of cultural differences in my work as a federal representative. I teach my children to appreciate this multiculturalism. After all, the U.S. Census Bureau instructs us that “People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race.” As a native New Yorker, I celebrate the melting pot that gives our nation its strength and resiliency.

About the Author: Elias serves as EPA Region 2’s bilingual public information officer. Prior to joining EPA, the proud Nuyorican worked at Time Inc. conducting research for TIME, LIFE, FORTUNE and PEOPLE magazines. He is a graduate of Hunter College, Baruch College and the Theological Institute of the Assembly of Christian Churches in NYC.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Sister Blog: Closing the Asthma Gap – Spanish Translation

EPA’s Spanish blog, Conversado acerca de nuestro media ambiente, posted a translation of our recent blog post, Science Matters: Closing the Asthma Gap.

You can read the translation here – Cerrando la brecha del asma para los niños pobres y minoritarios.

_______

Conversando acerca de nuestro medio ambiente, el blog de EPA en español, tradujo una entrada reciente de nuestro blog, Science Matters: Closing the Asthma Gap.

Para leer la traducción, haga clic aquí: Cerrando la brecha del asma para los niños pobres y minoritarios.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

La primavera es la época para sembrar…hasta en Greenversations

Por Kelly Dulka

El blog de Greenversations comenzó el Día del Planeta Tierra en el 2008. Desde entonces hemos compartido 1,500 entradas en 70 categorías diferentes y hemos leído unos 48,000 comentarios de personas como ustedes. Como una de las editoras de Greenversations, siempre he esperado con interés escuchar el sentir de muchos de nuestros lectores regulares y hasta he podido anticipar cuáles de las entradas al blog evocarían mucha interacción. También he visto cómo muchas de nuestras series (como los miércoles científicos y la serie bilingüe de Lina Younes) han tenidos su propios adeptos.

Por eso, después de un profundo análisis y una gran labor, hemos decidido tomar algunos “injertos” de este exitoso blog y sembrarlos. Ahora les pedimos que los alimenten y cuiden de ellos al leerlos y contribuir para que continúen desarrollándose estas conversaciones. A la misma vez, los hemos remozado, llevando todos nuestros blogs bajo un mismo diseño y creando una página donde encontrará todo en un mismo lugar.

Greenversations es ahora oficialmente el nombre de la familia de blogs de EPA y los foros de discusión. Notará que hay algunos elementos nuevos en todos nuestros blogs. Por ejemplo, hemos facilitado el proceso bajo el cual podrá compartir las entradas en Facebook, Twitter, y por correo electrónico así como de otras maneras. También podrá suscribirse a cada blog por correo electrónico o podrá recibir la familia entera de blogs Greenversations en Twitter.

Les exhortamos a que dediquen un momento para explorar todos nuestros blogs y leerlos e interactuar con otros lectores.

Lo que habían conocido como Greenversations (Conversaciones verdes) desde el 2008 ahora se conocerá como “Es nuestro medio ambiente” http://blog.epa.gov/blog/ y continuaremos compartiendo ideas con empleados de EPA en todo el país. Otros blogs existentes ahora aparecerán con un nuevo diseño:

Y ahora estamos lanzando unos blogs nuevos:

Estamos muy entusiasmados por continuar expandiendo nuestros ofertas de blogs y les agradecemos el que nos hayan leído y compartido durante estos años. Hemos convertido a Greenversations en uno de los blogs gubernamentales más robustos e innovadores. ¡Favor de ayudarnos a cuidar de estos nuevos retoños y esperamos verlos en nuestro jardín!

Acerca de la autora: Kelly Dulka trabaja en la Oficina de Comunicaciones de la Red en las Oficinas Centrales de EPA en Washington, DC.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Las matemáticas se encuentran en todas partes

Por Lina Younes

Desde que mis hijas eran pequeñas, traté de inculcarles un amor por las matemáticas y las ciencias. Cuando vi un artículo sobre una nueva exposición en el área de Washington titulada MathAlive,”  (Las Matemáticas Vivas) decidí inmediatamente que tenía que ir a dicha exposición. Claro que no mencioné el nombre de la exposición al inicio. De hecho, le comenté a mi hija menor que quería llevarla a una nueva exposición donde podría hacer esquí con una computadora y que podría traer a una amiguita. Me contestó afirmativamente de manera entusiasta. A pesar de que la exposición estaba supuestamente diseñada para estudiantes de escuela intermedia, decidí que llevaría a mi hija que está en escuela elemental. Habían actividades para niños de todas las edades.

La exposición tenía elementos interactivos en inglés y español con muchas actividades prácticas que enseñaban cómo las matemáticas son una parte integral de nuestra vida cotidiana. Desde la cocina, la música, los deportes, la construcción, el transporte, entornos construidos hasta la naturaleza, las matemáticas literalmente se encuentran por doquier. Como parte de la exposición, los niños podían realizar muestreos de agua virtuales usando las matemáticas para determinar si los cuerpos de agua eran seguros para la natación Usando las matemáticas, los niños podían ver la relación directa entre los contaminantes y las condiciones del agua. Habían otros experimentos parecidos referentes a la calidad del aire y otros asuntos ambientales. También habían otras áreas enfocadas en la robótica y la exploración espacial.

Mientas los niños quizás no pueden captar todos los conceptos matemáticos en una visita, me parece que la exposición definitivamente demuestra cómo el aprendizaje de las matemáticas puede ser una experiencia positiva y entretenida. Espero poder ver la exposición nuevamente. MathAlive viajará a otras ciudades en los Estados Unidos durante el año. Espero que tengan la oportunidad de verla también. Nos encantaría que compartieran sus experiencias con nosotros.

Acerca de la autora: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y se desempeña, en la actualidad, como directora asociada interina para educación ambiental. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

¿Tiene un detector de monóxido de carbono en su hogar?

Por Lina Younes

Estaba leyendo el periódico comunitario recientemente y uno de los artículos en la portada me llamó la atención. “Detector CO salva familia local”. Según el artículo, la estación local de bomberos respondió a una alarma de un detector de monóxido de carbono que había sonado de madrugada. Los residentes se despertaron cuando el detector de monóxido de carbono sonó la alarma a consecuencia de haber detectado la presencia de CO en el hogar. Cuando llegaron los bomberos encontraron niveles perjudiciales a la salud de este gas venenoso en la casa como resultado del tubo de escape de la calefacción que estaba averiado y estaba descargando el gas directamente al interior de la casa. Si la familia no hubiese tenido un detector de monóxido de carbono, el resultado del incidente hubiese sido muy diferente.

Lamentablemente, se producen envenenamientos de monóxido de carbono como resultado de personas que usan generadores al interior del hogar. El usar estos enseres adecuadamente puede prevenir los envenenamientos. Como vimos en este caso, un detector de CO rápidamente indicó cuándo este gas había llegado a niveles nocivos, protegiendo así a la familia.

¿Por qué son importantes los detectores de monóxido de carbono? Bueno, el monóxido de carbono es un gas tóxico que no se puede ver, saborear ni oler. La exposición a estas emisiones tóxicas a bajos niveles se puede confundir erradamente con los síntomas de la gripe. Sin embargo, una exposición a niveles elevados de monóxido de carbono o a largo plazo puede ser mortal. Los detectores rápidamente registrarán niveles nocivos de CO y sonarán la alarma. Se recomienda que coloque estos detectores de CO a la entrada de los dormitorios para así alertar a las familias mientras están durmiendo y poder salvarles la vida como vimos en esta instancia.

¿Qué otros pasos se pueden tomar para evitar que el monóxido de carbono entre en su hogar?

  • En primer lugar, nunca use generadores dentro del hogar ni en áreas cerradas
  • Siempre mantenga los enseres de gas bien ajustados y deles el mantenimiento adecuado
  • Instale y use abanicos de escape para ventilar hacia el exterior las emisiones de las estufas de gas
  • Si va quemar madera en su hogar, hágalo de manera adecuada.

Al tomar estos pasos sencillos, podrá tener un entorno interior más saludable y proteger a su familia.

Acerca de la autora: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y se desempeña, en la actualidad, como directora asociada interina para educación ambiental. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

El leer la etiqueta puede salvarle la vida (Parte 2)

Por Lina Younes

La semana pasada realicé varias entrevistas para la Semana Nacional de Prevención de Envenenamientos en las cuales me preguntaron con frecuencia acerca de las causas de los envenenamientos. Según las estadísticas recopiladas por los Centros de Control de Venenos en EE.UU., la mayoría de estos venenos se encuentran en productos que tenemos comúnmente en nuestros hogares. Independientemente del “veneno” en particular, hay un hecho que vincula la mayoría de estos envenenamientos. La mayoría pueden ser prevenidos si leemos la etiqueta primero.

Como mencioné la semana pasada, el detenerme a leer la etiqueta evitó un envenenamiento en mi hogar. Además hemos podido evitar otros envenenamientos en mi hogar debido a que leí la etiqueta. Por ejemplo, me acuerdo cuando mis hijas mayores estaban en escuela elemental, recibimos una notificación de que había una infestación de piojos en la escuela. Varios días más tarde me di cuenta que lo que yo creía que era caspa en realidad eran piojos. Claro que corrí a la farmacia más cercana para comprar productos anti-piojos. Compré champús, peinillas especiales y un pesticida para aplicar en la cama. Cuando llegué a casa, les lavé la cabeza con el champú anti-piojos. Estaba tentada a dejar el champú por mucho tiempo en su pelo para eliminar toda evidencia de los piojos, pero un sexto sentido me hizo leer la etiqueta. Según la etiqueta, ¡había que enjuagarles el pelo a los diez minutos!

¿Qué hubiese sucedido si dejaba esas sustancias químicas por demasiado tiempo en su pelo? Bueno, hubiesen sido absorbidas por el cuero cabelludo y se hubiesen podido envenenar. Tan sencillo como eso.

¿Cuántas veces no aplicamos varios productos de limpieza a la vez porque creemos que “quedará más limpio? ¿Cuántas veces no hemos vaciado un envase de plaguicidas cuando solo vemos una pequeña cucaracha en la casa? ¿Cuántas veces no hemos combinado varios medicamentos bajo la creencia errada de que curaremos un catarro más rápidamente?

Si lee la etiqueta, verá claramente lo que tiene que hacer para aplicar plaguicidas, productos de limpieza, productos de aseo personal y hasta medicamentos para así protegerse a usted y a su familia. La etiqueta claramente ofrece instrucciones acerca de la aplicación, dosis, y duración. El leer tomará unos minutos de su tiempo, pero podría salvarle la vida. ¿Tiene experiencias semejantes que quisiera compartir con nosotros?

Acerca de la autora: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y se desempeña, en la actualidad, como directora asociada interina para educación ambiental. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

¿Limpieza de primavera? ¿Cuán importantes son los conductos de aire?

Es primavera. ¿Cómo lo sé? Por la correspondencia que he recibido sobre la limpieza de conductos de aire. Tiene sentido que los envíen ahora mientras nosotros los residentes nos preparamos para los meses más cálidos limpiando y haciendo reparaciones en el hogar. ¿Pero es necesario limpiar los conductos de aire en mi casa? ¿Puede esto afectar el aire que respiro en mi hogar? ¿Afectará esto a mi salud?

Por suerte, yo trabajo con expertos que afortunadamente me ayudaron a navegar esta interrogante. No se preocupe, ya que – todas sus palabras sabias están en la página Web de la EPA acerca de los conductos de aire para que usted pueda verlas en cualquier momento, y así pueda tomar la mejor decisión para usted.

Cosas que aprendí:

  • Primero, familiarícese con los consejos generales acerca de la calidad del aire interior para reducir riesgos: controle fuentes de contaminación dentro del hogar, cambie los filtros regularmente y ajuste la humedad.
  • Nunca se ha demostrado que limpiando los conductos de aire pueda prevenir efectivamente los problemas de salud. Los estudios científicos son inconcluyentes acerca de si los niveles de polvo en los hogares aumentan debido a que los conductos de aire estén sucios.
  • Los contaminantes en los interiores que entran desde el exterior o son provocados por actividades en el interior-como cocinar, limpiar o fumar – pueden causar una exposición mayor a los contaminantes que la que pudieran causar los conductos de aire sucios.
  • Usted tiene que inspeccionar los conductos de aire para determinar si tienen que ser limpiados o no.

Usted debería considerar la limpieza de conductos de aire si:

  • Hay un crecimiento sustancial visible de moho en el interior de los conductos de aire o en parte de su sistema de calefacción y aire acondicionado (HVAC, por sus siglas en inglés). (Si hay moho, hay probablemente un problema de humedad. Un profesional debe encontrar la causa del problema del agua y arreglarlo.) Si usted consulta a un profesional, asegúrese de que le muestran dónde está el moho antes de seguir adelante.
  • Los conductos están infestados con roedores o insectos. No está bien.
  • Los conductos están obstruidos con cantidades excesivas de polvo y escombros que son liberados en la casa por medio de los respiraderos.

Si encuentra cualquiera de estos problemas, identifique la causa fundamental antes de hacer la limpieza, la renovación o la sustitución de los conductos de aire. Si no lo hace, es probable que el problema vuelva a suceder.

Hay poca evidencia que indique que el limpiar los conductos de aire mejoren su salud o mejoren la eficiencia. Para aprender acerca del mantenimiento y eficiencia de los sistemas centrales de aire acondicionado y calefacción, visite nuestra página sobre calentar y enfriar de manera eficiente.

Decisión, decisiones. Si decido limpiar los conductos de aire, me aseguraré de seguir el consejo de los expertos de la EPA. También voy a verificar cuidadosamente el historial de servicios del proveedor antes de hacer algo. Y no me voy a olvidar de ver, con mis propios ojos, el crecimiento de moho u otros problemas antes de tomar una decisión final.

La autora, Kelly Hunt, es una especialista en comunicaciones con la Oficina de Aire y Radiación de la EPA. Su carrera como relacionista pública se inicio en el año 2001 y actualmente su nuevo enfoque es en respuestas a emergencias ambientales y en el alcance e integración comunitaria en asuntos de radiación y de aire de interiores.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

El leer la etiqueta puede salvarle la vida

Por Lina Younes

Hace varios años, conseguimos una perrita para nuestra niña menor. Mientras esperábamos la llegada de la nueva mascota con gran anticipación, había una cosa que no habíamos anticipado: una infestación de pulgas. Tan pronto llegó la perrita, las pulgas empezaron a picarnos con todo su gusto. Ellas inmediatamente se aclimataron e invadieron todo. Pensé en usar un nebulizador, pero no pensaba que podría resolver el problema de las pulgas en la perra y por toda la casa. Entonces, fui a la tienda especializada en productos para macotas para encontrar los productos más potentes para eliminar estas criaturas indeseables. Compré varios champús para perros y el envase más grande que tenían en los anaqueles. Vi que la etiqueta del frente decía “mata pulgas” e inmediatamente lo agarré y fui a pagar para librar mi casa de las pulgas.

Lo primero que hice fue darle a la perrita un buen baño con el champú anti-pulgas. Entonces, quería aplicar el líquido que había comprado en el envase grande. Antes de abrirlo, leí la etiqueta primero. ¿Cómo lo tenía que aplicar? ¿Había que diluirlo? ¿Rociarlo? ¿Aplicarlo directamente a los pisos, alfombras o muebles tapizados? En esos momentos yo no estaba pensando en la seguridad. ¡Mi enfoque mayor era en cómo me iba a librar de las plagas! Bueno, me alegro de haberme detenido a leer las instrucciones en la etiqueta en la parte de atrás de la botella. El producto era para ser utilizado en graneros donde hay caballos y no en hogares donde hay niños pequeños y mascotas.

Me horrorizo nada más de pensar lo que hubiese podido ocurrir si me hubiese puesto a echar ese líquido por todas partes como realmente quería hacer cuando lo compré. Se hubiese producido un envenenamiento accidental de haber aplicado el producto incorrectamente. En fin de cuentas, aguantamos el problema de las pulgas por unas horas más. A la mañana siguiente, regresé a la tienda, devolví el producto, y compré lo que necesitaba para librarme de las pulgas y proteger a mi familia.

Por lo tanto, durante la Semana Nacional de Prevención de Envenenamientos maneje los productos plaguicidas y sustancias químicas domésticas adecuadamente. Manténgalos fuera de alcance de los niños y recuérdese de leer la etiqueta para información clave sobre cómo usarlos apropiadamente y las instrucciones de primeros auxilios. ¿Ha tenido experiencias similares? Compártalas con nosotros.

Acerca de la autora: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y se desempeña, en la actualidad, como directora asociada interina para educación ambiental. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0u7gerCEjk&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Semana Nacional de Prevención de Envenenamientos—18 al 24 de marzo de 2012

Por Lina Younes

¿Sabía que los envenenamientos continúan siendo una causa significativa de enfermedades y muertes en los Estados Unidos? ¿Sabía que la mayoría de estos envenenamientos se pueden prevenir en un 100%? Es por eso que la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) y sus principales socios federales están uniendo sus fuerzas para crear conciencia sobre los peligros del envenenamiento durante la Semana Nacional de Prevención de Envenenamientos del 18 al 24 de marzo. Más de 150,000 llamadas a los centros de envenenamientos están relacionados con pesticidas. Más del 50% de estas exposiciones involucran a niños de 5 años y menores. EPA está tomando pasos especiales para prevenir exposiciones accidentales entre los niños pequeños porque ellos son especialmente vulnerables por varias razones. Como su cuerpo y órganos están en pleno desarrollo, cualquier exposición aumenta los peligros. También, como los niños frecuentemente están gateando o llevándose cosas a la boca, estos comportamientos los ponen en mayor riesgo. De hecho, el año pasado, EPA tomó pasos reglamentarios para prevenir envenenamientos debido a productos para el control de roedores en el hogar. Ahora EPA exige a todos los fabricantes de productos de venenos para ratas que sólo los vendan para consumidores en cebos encerrados que sean resistentes a los niños y a las mascotas, pero accesible a las ratas y ratones que quieren eliminar.

¿Y qué puede hacer para proteger a su familia de los envenenamientos accidentales? He aquí algunos consejos sencillos:

Primero que nada, mantenga los productos plaguicidas, limpiadores caseros, y medicamentos en anaqueles altos fuera del alcance de los niños en un gabinete cerrado o en la caseta del jardín.

Lea la etiqueta cuidadosamente antes de usar plaguicidas o productos de limpieza domésticos.

El usar más de lo que está indicado en la etiqueta no va a matar más plagas ni limpiar mejor. De hecho, el usar estos productos inadecuadamente sólo aumenta el riesgo de envenenamientos.

Mantenga los plaguicidas y sustancias químicas caseras en sus envases originales.

No use pesticidas ilegales. Son extremadamente tóxicos y peligrosos.

Vaya por su casa habitación en habitación para ver si hay posibles riesgos de envenenamientos y corríjalos correspondientemente.

Programe la línea gratuita de ayuda para control de venenos (800-222-1222) en su teléfono o coloque el número cercano al teléfono. En caso de un envenenamiento accidental, llame a la línea gratuita para control de venenos que tiene operadoras trabajando las 24 horas del día. Hay ayuda disponible en inglés, español y otros idiomas.

Ayude a comunicar el mensaje de la Semana Nacional para la Prevención de Envenenamientos. Juntos podemos prevenir los envenenamientos accidentales en el hogar. Ha tomado pasos para prevenir envenenamientos recientemente. Nos encontraría escuchar su sentir al respecto.

Si quiere información adicional sobre el uso seguro de plaguicidas, visite nuestra nueva página Web. Para mayor información en español sobre este tema y otros de interés ambiental, visite nuestra nueva página en español.

Acerca de la autora: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y se desempeña, en la actualidad, como directora asociada interina para educación ambiental. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.