new york city environment

The Magnificent “Clearwater” Sloop

By Larry Siegel

Want to go sailing on a sloop? Come aboard ye landlubbers for an afternoon of fun and education for the whole family.

In 1966, a handful of Hudson river-lovers decided to change the course of events that was destroying the Hudson and reclaim a natural treasure for us all. They wanted to dramatize the river’s plight, recall its history, and help guide its future. They wanted to provide their fellow citizens with a first-hand look at the neglect and pollution of the river, and move them to action. So they built a boat. And what a magnificent boat!

By contacting the Clearwater organization you can find out the details regarding charters (for education groups as well as private parties) and public sails (on which individuals and small groups can purchase tickets).

Clearwater offers a number of educational, volunteer, and fun filled programs, but Clearwater’s “Classroom Under Sail” is the centerpiece of the Clearwater education program. This three hour shipboard program is an exploration of the Hudson River and environmental awareness that forges a lifelong connection with nature.

And, if you like folk music, not to be missed is the annual two day Clearwater Music and Environmental Festival that takes place at Croton Point Park in Croton-on-Hudson, NY in Westchester County. If you can make your way up there it is a great event.

About the Author: Larry Siegel has worked as a writer of corporate policies and procedures and as a technical writer. He currently works as a Pesticide Community Outreach Specialist for the Pesticide and Toxic Substances Branch in Edison, NJ

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Tourism Brings Green, But Can it Be Green?

By Kasia Broussalian

You know those I ♥ NY T-shirts? There’s a reason they are so popular. Though France has the Eiffel Tower, and Rome has St. Peter’s Basilica, New York City has no shortage of its own icons. First and foremost there’s the Statue of Liberty. But then there’s the Empire State Building. Don’t forget about Rockefeller Center, Times Square, Brooklyn Bridge, and yes, even the Wall Street Bull. All these certainly make for quite a busy trip.

Of, course, there’s money involved, too. In 2010, 47.8 million tourists visited New York City from all over the world, spending a whopping $31 billion dollars that supported roughly 303,649 jobs here in the city. While that’s presumably great for our own economy (not to mention SoHo’s), all that traffic (foot and otherwise) placed quite a bit of strain on the city’s resources and sustainability goals. While many tourist destinations around the world have a designated season, thereby giving the ecology of the city a break in between; New York City does not. There are certainly spikes around Thanksgiving and Christmas; but otherwise, numbers of visitors remain fairly consistent. Which means the city really has to work at putting its green foot forward every day of the year. One way the city combats the strain from tourism is by placing portable drinking fountains near icon locations (stay tuned for next week’s post!). What are some areas the city needs to work on to efficiently keep up with the tourists’ pace?

Check out this slideshow from Life on how to blend in with the crowd. Hopefully it’ll give you quite a chuckle.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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