fuel efficient

Earth Month Tip: Remember car maintenance

A well-maintained car is more fuel-efficient, produces less carbon pollution and keeps you safe. Keeping your car in shape includes keeping your engine properly tuned, using the recommended grade of motor oil, and replacing a clogged air filters. Get regular tune-ups, follow the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule (which can be found in your owner’s manual), and use the recommended grade of motor oil.

Learn more: http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/maintain.jsp

More tips: http://www.epa.gov/earthday/actonclimate/

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Choosing A New Car For A Longer Commute

By Lina Younes

My son started a new job recently. While we’re all very excited about his new job opportunity, there’s a drawback. The new job entails a longer commute. Therefore, my son is seriously considering buying a more fuel efficient car to make the long commute less painful at the pump.

While he has some preferred models in mind, I recommended that he do his homework before even venturing into a car showroom. I told him about EPA’s new Fuel Economy Guide for 2014 which has the fuel estimates for over one thousand vehicles. With this online guide, he’ll be able to compare which models have the best fuel efficiency according to his driving habits and commute. He’ll be able to plug in the information according to the type of car he’s looking for, if he drives in city traffic or on highways, etc. He can even compare the vehicles according to price range. Furthermore, he can see which cars are better for the environment given the green rating they’ve received due to the amount of green house gases they emit. The guide even provides data for hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles.

In fact, the fuel economy website includes the MPG ratings for both new and used cars. So you’ll have the information readily at hand to make the best choice for your pocket and the environment, even if you choose an older model. Make your own EPA’s new MPG label on used cars.

As a mom, I feel that I wouldn’t be doing my job well if I didn’t mention another good site that he should visit before buying a new vehicle. It’s www.safercar.gov which provides safety ratings for vehicles. Not only do I want him to save his hard earned money, but I also want him to be safe.

Are you considering purchasing a new or used vehicle? Do you want to calculate your fuel savings? Check out this tool  and tell us what you think.

 About the author:  Lina Younes has been working for EPA since 2002 and currently serves the Multilingual Communications Liaison for EPA. She manages EPA’s social media efforts in Spanish. Prior to joining EPA, she was the Washington bureau chief for two Puerto Rican newspapers and she has worked for several government agencies.

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Fueling our Future

By Bob Perciasepe, Acting Administrator

This month EPA took an important next step to ensure that the cars of the future are not only the most fuel efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective cars to hit America’s roads – but they’re also the healthiest.

The new tailpipe standards we proposed, which are currently out for public comment, will protect millions of Americans from breathing polluted, potentially harmful air. These standards for tailpipe emissions are called “Tier 3” and include a combination of lowering sulfur content in gasoline and enhancing emission controls in automobiles – a systematic approach that has proven successful in the past as an efficient and cost effective program. That, in turn, will lead to significant public health benefits: Our research indicates that, by 2030, Tier 3 standards would annually prevent up to 2,400 premature deaths, 23,000 cases of respiratory symptoms in children, and 1.8 million sick days home from work or school.

Tier 3 tailpipe emission standards are designed to work in concert with vehicle fuel economy and green house gas standards the Obama Administration finalized last summer. When fully implemented, this comprehensive approach will save thousands of lives and protect the health of millions – all while strengthening our energy security, cutting greenhouse gas emissions, and saving drivers money at the pump.  Reducing our dependence on oil, and foreign oil in particular, is an important part of the all-of-the-above approach to energy President Obama has long championed. So, even as we are increasing the amount of oil produced on our shores annually, we are also working to ensure the cars Americans will be driving are far more fuel efficient.  The fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards finalized last summer will phase in each year and ultimately double the fuel economy of motor vehicles by 2025, cutting oil consumption by 12 billion barrels in the process. Less oil consumed means substantially less greenhouse gas pollution, a leading driver of climate change. It also means fewer dollars spent filling up gas tanks – an estimated 1.7 trillion fewer dollars in total. Much has been made of the small – less than a penny – estimated increase in the cost of gasoline from Tier 3, but when you look at the full program and improved fuel economy and the tremendous savings of using half the gasoline for the same drive, consumers win – big time.

Much like the standards from last summer, the proposed Tier 3 tailpipe emission standards are already seeing widespread support from the auto industry. Clear, national standards allow manufacturers to sell the same vehicles in all 50 states. They also give automakers the market confidence they need to invest in the cleaner, more efficient technologies of the future. That’s why Gloria Berquist, vice president of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, this month called Tier 3 “a positive step forward,” explaining that the industry has wanted a “road map” to simplify regulations nationwide. When coupled with the fuel economy standards, these comprehensive approach fuel and tailpipe standards will provide the clear signal for increased investment and jobs in the automobile industry.

State and local officials support Tier 3 tailpipe standards, too. Stronger emissions standards make it easier for local governments to meet their Clean Air Act responsibilities and ensure residents are able to enjoy the clean, healthier air they expect and deserve.

Cleaner air rarely comes for free, but we often find that costs are dwarfed by the benefits clean air provides. This case is no exception. By 2030, EPA estimates that the monetized health benefits of the proposed Tier 3 tailpipe standards would be somewhere between $8 and $23 billion each year. That’s up to $7 in health benefits for every $1 invested in meeting the new standards. When combined with the thousands of dollars every driver will save at the pump thanks to last summer’s updated fuel economy standards, American drivers will be paying a lot less for gasoline over the next decade.

That is the beauty of the comprehensive approach now made possible by the proposed Tier 3 tailpipe standards: significant air pollution reductions with up to $23 billion in health benefits and modern fuels for modern automobile technology that is creating investment and jobs, doubling fuel economy, cutting gasoline bills in half on average and reducing green house gases.

For more than four years, this administration has worked to ensure the next generation of vehicles will offer all of the choices drivers have today. But those vehicles will also be more technologically advanced than ever before. They will be more efficient and much cheaper to power. And they will leave our communities cleaner and healthier than they have been in decades.

About the author: Bob Perciasepe is acting administrator of the U.S. EPA.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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The New Car

By Amy Miller

I have a headache. I just bought a new car and I tell you, it’s confusing. We have a van and an AWD wagon. We like them both, but as you know the gas is killing us.

Let’s go for one of those 40 mpg and greater cars, I told my husband. After all, we drive 30,000 miles a year. If our old cars got 20 miles to the gallon and these cars get 40, you do the math. I did, and I realized I could save $3,000 a year at $4 a gallon. That is nothing to sneeze at. I’d spend $3,000 instead of $6,000 a year on gas.

Wait a minute. $6,000 a year? Yup. 1,500 gallons of gas. So I bought the shiny little silver subcompact, the one with a good engine and enough room for my kids to be comfortable in back.

OK, so it only gets 33 mpg, but still.

And I no sooner had it home than I started putting things in the trunk and realized I better stop. There wasn’t any more room.

Uh oh.

Can we all four go to NY and still bring clothes? Well, maybe in summer and spring, but never when we need snow pants and boots. Can I pick up my daughter when she has skis? Well yes, as long as there were no other kids but her and her brother.

Maybe I should have read the “what should I consider when buying a new car” hint in EPA’s Tips to Save Gas and Improve Mileage webpage. It says “Buy a fuel efficient model in the size category that meets your needs. (emphasis mine).

So then I redo the math. What if we have to drive the van more often so we can fit luggage or a friend? Suddenly the equation changes. Maybe a mid-size car that gets 28 miles to the gallon would be the perfect in between. But maybe my daughter will not be in the car much, now that she is in high school. Or maybe we will buy a cargo box. Oh, my headache is getting worse.

Maybe next time I’ll just go back to the army tank thing my 10-year-old son wants. He doesn’t see any conflict between loving wildlife and getting 12 miles to the gallon. Oh for the innocence of youth.

About the author: Amy Miller is a writer who works in the public affairs office of EPA New England in Boston. She lives in Maine with her husband, two children, seven chickens, two parakeets, dog and a great community.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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