environmental programs

Summer in the City: Green Opportunity for Students

By Teresa Ippolito

How does this sound: spend a week learning about the environment  taking field trips to Gateway National Park on Staten Island, Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fire Island National Seashore on Long Island and Fort Totten Park in Queens and then maybe work for the National Forest Service this summer?

Well, that opportunity is out there.  The National Hispanic Environmental Council is working with the National Forest Service to find talented, motivated students, especially youth of color, aged 16 – 18, interested in a green career. If you are a talented and motivated student, from the New York area, love the environment, AND want a job in this field, this program is for you.

Step one is to find out about and register for The National Hispanic Environmental Council‘s (NHEC) NYC Minority Youth Environmental Training Institute which runs from  June 27 through July3.  The Institute is an intensive, science-based, residential, and highly educational seven day environmental education and environmental career program.

Spend a week this summer learning about the environment and the job opportunities it can provide.  Participating students will be housed at the Navy Lodge, a hotel in Gateway National Park during the Institute.  The Institute is designed to help build the environmental leaders and professionals of tomorrowby educating, engaging, and inspiring youth, especially Latinos/other minorities, on a range of environmental and natural resource issues. The Institute also provides information on the many different college and career opportunities in the environment.

And about working for the National Forest Service?  They will recruit youth from the Institute to work in national forests this summer.

There is not much time left. The due date?  NHEC accepts applicants to its upcoming NYC Institute on a rolling basis and up to the limits of available funding. So, there is no “due date”.  However students are strongly urged to send in their applications as soon as possible.  Selections have already been made and will continue to be.   While Institute slots do remain, at this point students need to apply promptly.

Get started at:

http://nheec1.org/uploads/2012–NYC_Institute–Fact_Sheet.pdf

About the Author: Terry Ippolito serves as the region’s Environmental Education Coordinator out of EPA’s Manhattan office.  A former science teacher and school administrator, she brings real world insights into the challenges and delights of teaching about the environment.  Terry holds a B.S in Biology and a Masters in Environmental Health Science.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Environmental Justice: An Ongoing Commitment

By Kesha Hagerman

As a chemical engineering undergraduate in my final year, I was well aware of regulatory government agencies before interning with EPA in New York City. I heard all about how they regulate air and water pollution, solid wastes, waste dump sites and chemical spills. These regulations were embedded into the chemical engineering curriculum and were therefore, familiar to me.

Environmental justice (EJ) on the other hand, never came up in the classroom. Well, not in the terms in which EPA defines it. After joining the agency, I have realized that EJ is not just simply “going green” by recycling or not littering; EPA’s commitment to EJ means that all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income receive fair treatment and meaningful involvement with respect to the development and enforcement of environmental laws and regulations.

I have lived in both Texas and Louisiana; therefore, I have encountered numerous chemical processing plants. Residents have actually nicknamed a city “stink-edina” because of the overwhelming amount of smog. But this is no isolated case; New York has also had issues with poor air quality. More

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.