children

Paint and Kids Don’t Always Mix

About the author: Brenda Reyes Tomassini joined EPA in 2002. She is a public affairs specialist in the San Juan, Puerto Rico office and also handles community relations for the Caribbean Environmental Protection Division.

It’s time for the dreaded task again: time to paint our house. As I discussed with my husband the possibility of hiring a contractor to paint the house exterior and for us to paint inside, our son’s asthma became a sudden concern. Paints, stains and varnishes release low level toxic emissions into the air for years after application . These toxic emissions stem from a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are a by-product of petrochemical-based solvents used in paints. Exposure to VOC’s in paint can trigger asthma attacks, eye, throat and nose irritation, respiratory problems, nausea, allergic skin reactions and dizziness among other symptoms. As one can imagine, painting our house would require extreme planning, including a temporary move.

EPA studies indicate that when people use and store products containing organic chemicals, they can expose themselves and others to very high pollutant levels. These elevated concentrations can persist in the air long after the activity is completed, thus causing the quality of indoor air to deteriorate.

Given our concerns, I decided to embark on an internet research of our alternatives for painting the house without affecting our son’s health. These is a list of the suggestions I found on various sites, including EPA’s

  • Low VOC or No VOC paints are an excellent alternative for painting the inside of our house.
  • Ventilation is very important while painting.
  • Warnings in the labels are extremely important since these are aimed at reducing exposure of the user.
  • Buying limited quantities might save us something more than money. By buying only what we need we won’t have to worry about the fumes and toxic materials emitted by these paints while being on storage. Gases can leak even when the containers are closed.
  • By using the right equipment-including masks–as with any other household project–we can reduce our exposure to hazardous substances while completing our task.

So before mixing that paint, take the necessary steps to protect your family.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Young Students Engaged in Environmental Stewardship

About the author: Lina Younes has been working for EPA since 2002 and chairs EPA’s Multilingual Communications Task Force. Prior to joining EPA, she was the Washington bureau chief for two Puerto Rican newspapers and she has worked for several government agencies.

During a recent visit to K.W. Barrett Elementary School in Arlington, VA, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson met with a diverse group of young students from the school’s 4-H Club and the LNESC Young Readers Program. It was very exciting to see these young students actively engaged in environmental protection activities like school recycling projects, garden clean ups, tree plantings, to name a few.

When Administrator Jackson asked them about our environmental challenges, many hands eagerly shot up! The children highlighted numerous concerns like global warming, climate change, dependence on fossil fuels, water quality, recycling, etc. I was impressed by their grasp of the issues given the fact that they ranged from first graders to fifth graders. What most struck me was that they were not parroting what they had heard from their teachers in school or from parents at the dinner table. They were truly engaged in the discussion.

Image of Administrator Jackson talking with children seated in a circle around her.

During the Administrator’s visit, the students proudly spoke of their activities. We even saw a video they produced at the school entitled “Hug a Tree”. It was adorable. It warmed my heart to see these young children speaking and acting as concerned citizens of today and tomorrow. I definitely saw future scientists, researchers, engineers, teachers—working together to better protect our home, Planet Earth. Who knows, maybe some of these young students will be future awardees of EPA’s P3: People, Prosperity and the Planet Student Design Competition for Sustainability. Anything is possible.

So let’s go green every day of the year, at school, at home, and in our communities.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Jóvenes estudiantes comprometidos con el civismo ambiental

Sobre la autor: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y está a cargo del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Comunicaciones Multilingües. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Durante una reciente visita a la Escuela Elemental K.W. Barrett en Arlington, VA, la Administradora de EPA Lisa Jackson se reunió con un grupo de jóvenes estudiantes de diversos grupos étnicos participantes en el Club 4-H de la escuela y del Programa de Jóvenes Lectores de LNESC. Fue muy emocionante ver estos jóvenes estudiantes trabajando activamente en actividades de protección ambiental como proyectos escolares de reciclaje, la limpieza del jardín, el sembrado de árboles, entre otras actividades.

Cuando la Administradora Jackson les preguntó acerca de nuestros retos medioambientales, muchos levantaron sus manos entusiastamente. Los niños destacaron numerosas preocupaciones tales como el calentamiento global, el cambio climático, la dependencia en los combustibles fósiles, la calidad del agua, el reciclaje, etc. Me impresionó ver su manejo de estos asuntos dado el hecho de que la mayoría estaban en los grados del primero al quinto. También me sorprendió el que no estaban repitiendo las cosas al papagayo que quizás habrían escuchado de sus maestros en la escuela o de sus padres en casa. Estaban totalmente enfrascados en la discusión.

Image of EPA Administrator Jackson speaking with children sitting in a circle around her

Durante la visita de la Administradora, los estudiantes hablaron orgullosamente acerca de sus actividades a favor del medio ambiente. Hasta nos mostraron un video que habían producido en la escuela titulado “Abraza a un árbol”. Era enternecedor. Me emocionó ver estos jovencitos hablar y obrar como los ciudadanos preocupados del hoy y del mañana. Definitivamente ví futuros científicos, investigadores, ingenieros, maestros—trabajando juntos para mejor proteger nuestro hogar, el Planeta Tierra. Quién sabe, quizás algunos de estos jóvenes estudiantes serían futuros galardonados del concurso P3 de EPA: la Competencia de diseño estudiantil para la sostenibilidad de EPA conocida como Pueblo, Prosperidad y Planeta. Cualquier cosa es posible.

Por ende, obremos a favor del Planeta Tierra. Seamos verdes todos los días del año, en la escuela, en el hogar, y en nuestras comunidades.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Cómo educar a los niños sobre el reciclaje

Cómo educar a los niños sobre el reciclaje

Acerca del autor: Vicky Salazar comenzó a trabajar en EPA en 1995. Labora en nuestra oficina en Seattle en asuntos relacionados con la reducción de desechos, conservación de recursos y civismo ambiental.

El reciclaje es difícil. Yo misma me pregunto a veces qué debo reciclar. Por lo tanto cuando hablo con los niños acerca del reciclaje, ¿a dónde debo comenzar? Bueno, tuve que enseñar a unos niños de edad pre-escolar acerca del Día del Reciclaje en Estados Unidos y esto fue lo que aprendí.

He aquí unas reglas sencillas:

  • Latas, papel, cajas, potes y botellas van en el recipiente de reciclaje.
  • Si está sucio, lávelo y descártelo.
  • No recicle las tapas de los potes y envases, esas van en la basura.
  • No eche alimentos en el recipiente de reciclaje—aún si están unidos a otra cosa.
  • Si está roto, échelo a la basura.
  • Si puede volverse a utilizar, úselo nuevamente o dónelo a alguien que lo pueda utilizar.

Póngalo en práctica – Hay que practicar realmente. No fue hasta que los niños lo hicieron varias veces que pudieron recordar qué había que poner en cada lugar.

Habrán errores—Aprovéchelos como una oportunidad para enseñar.

Relacione el reciclaje con la importancia de proteger la Tierra y los animales. Los niños verdaderamente quieren ayudar.

Póngalo a prueba con sus hijos. Es divertido, informativo, y me recordó cómo reciclar. ¿Cómo funcionó para usted?

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

A Nature Lesson in my Own Backyard

About the author: Brenda Reyes Tomassini joined EPA in 2002. She is a public affairs specialist in the San Juan, Puerto Rico office and also handles community relations for the Caribbean Environmental Protection Division.

“You don’t care about what you don’t know.” That phrase stuck with me long after watching the wonderful video, Wetlands & Wonder: Reconnecting Children with Nearby Nature. I was fortunate enough, as well as most of my co-workers, to grow up surrounded by beautiful open spaces. There was no satellite TV, no Ipod, no PlayStation nor the Web. If I wanted to play, I had to go outside to our backyard or go bike riding with my brother or cousins around the neighborhood. Every time we left the house. a whole new world of exploration and curiosity unraveled before our eyes. Many of the activities we did as young children were nature oriented. Our maternal grandparents had a farm and from our paternal grandmother’s backyard the nearby El Yunque rainforest was on full display. We got our feet wet in the Río Blanco River and plenty of times came home carrying treasures from the beach. Nowadays, I work as public affairs specialist at EPA in San Juan and my brother works as a marine scientist at NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle, Washington.

photo of author with her sonAs a modern day parent, getting my kids out into nature can be a challenge. Even though I take them frequently to the country or on the occasional road trip, finding time to experience nature every day is very hard. Four children, a busy schedule, and living in the suburbs are not the right mix to provide for nature oriented experiences. Still,I carve out the occasional moment to give my kids outdoor experiences, like when I tend to my garden or let them play when I air-dry our clothes, Recently, I accidentally ran a cart over a small snake. Upon finding it, I took my three year-old son to the backyard to show him the dead snake. I ran my fingers over its slimy body and my son felt instant curiosity to know how it felt, and did the same. I told him about what snakes eat and how they hide in the base of the ginger and heliconia plants.

Kids don’t have to travel far or visit a museum to learn about nature; the easiest access is often found in our own backyards, in our parks, in the empty lot nearby our houses. If they get to know and experience, nature they will become adults concerned with safeguarding their surroundings and, thus, the environment.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Una lección sobre naturaleza en mi patio

Sobre la autor: Brenda Reyes Tomassini se unió a la EPA en el 2002. Labora como especialista de relaciones públicas en la oficina de EPA en San Juan, Puerto Rico donde también maneja asuntos comunitarios para la División de Protección Ambiental del Caribe.

“No se le da importancia a lo que no se conoce” La frase se me quedó grabada luego de ver la maravillosa película Wetlands & Wonder: Reconnecting Children with Nearby Nature. Me considero afortunada de haber podido crecer, al igual que muchos de mis compañeros de trabajo, rodeada de espacios verdes. No tenía televisión satélite , I-pod, ni un PlayStation. Si quería jugar, tenía que ir al patio o a correr bicicleta por el vecindario con mi hermano y mis primas. Cada vez que salíamos de la casa a recorrer nuestros alrededores, un nuevo mundo de exploración se revelaba ante nuestros ojos. Muchas de las actividades que realizábamos mi hermano y yo eran relacionadas a la naturaleza. Además de las visitas mensuales, pasábamos las vacaciones en la finca de nuestros abuelos maternos o en casa de nuestra abuela paterna desde cuyo patio se podía apreciar el Bosque El Yunque. Fueron muchas las veces que mojamos nuestros pies en el agua del Río Blanco y otro tanto que llegamos cargando “tesoros” de la playa. El resultado es que ambos tenemos una carrera relacionada al medioambiente, yo trabajo en la EPA en San Juan como oficial de asuntos públicos y mi hermano es doctor en ciencias marinas para NOAA en Seattle, Washington.

photo of author and her sonHoy día como madre exponer a mis hijos a este tipo de actividad, que para mi era tan común, es un gran reto. Aunque suelo llevarlos al campo y a la playa ocasionalmente, hacer tiempo en nuestra rutina diaria para convivir con la naturaleza es difícil. Mi agitado estilo de vida, vivir en los suburbios unido a la crianza de 4 niños no son una receta fácil para obtener experiencias relacionadas a la naturaleza diariamente. Sin embargo trato de buscar esos momentos como cuando vamos a sembrar plantas en el jardín o secamos la ropa al aire libre, ocasión en que los niños exploran abiertamente sus alrededores o como cuando recientemente aplasté una pequeña culebra en nuestro patio. Cuando la encontré llevé a mi hijo de 3 años al patio para que pudiera verla. Al deslizar mis dedos sobre el cuerpo de esta, mi hijo sintió la curiosidad innata de hacer exactamente lo mismo. Aproveché el momento y le hablé sobre ellas y cuanto les encanta esconderse en la base de los jengibres y heliconias del patio.

Estoy convencida que los niños no necesitan viajar lejos o visitar un museo para aprender sobre la naturaleza. El acceso más fácil está en nuestro patio, en los parques de nuestra comunidad o en el terreno vacío a lado de la casa. Si conocen y experimentan la naturaleza crecerán convertidos en adultos conscientes de ella y por ende protectores del medioambiente que les rodea.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

At The Movies

About the author: Lina Younes has been working for EPA since 2002 and chairs EPA’s Multilingual Communications Task Force. Prior to joining EPA, she was the Washington bureau chief for two Puerto Rican newspapers and she has worked for several government agencies.

Lea la versión en español a continuación de esta entrada en inglés. Some links exit EPA or have Spanish content. Exit EPA Disclaimer

As a mother of a four daughters (including a six year old), I’m always on the look out for good family movies we can all enjoy. Trying to satisfy the film tastes of the entire family is not always an easy task. Nonetheless, I’ve noticed something lately. Hollywood has started to incorporate green issues into movies for children with some commercial success. So we can still go to the movies and enjoy the experience while getting something positive out of the movie at the same time.

Just this past weekend, the whole family went to see WALL-E, the computer animated movie about a determined robot or more precisely a Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-Class unit—hence the name—entrusted with the mission of cleaning up a trash covered planet. I’m not going to talk about the plot. But I must confess that upon reading the reviews, I went to see the movie with some hesitation. The movie was somewhat “dark” by traditional children movie standards. Nonetheless, my six year old enjoyed it, even though the true message went right over her head. My elder daughters were quite moved by the experience. Some of us shed a tear or two. I guess it was a win-win all the way around.

Other family movies with a green twist are Happy Feet and Hoot to name a few. And for the true film enthusiasts in the Washington area, I recommend a yearly green ritual—the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital which usually takes place in March.

So, if going to the movies, a park, or the zoo is your day of family fun, by all means, go ahead and enjoy. Yet, if you prefer to use your computer to teach your kids about environmental awareness, recycling, children environmental health tips, etc., please visit us at www.epa.gov.

Va Al Cine

Sobre la autor: Lina M. F. Younes ha trabajado en la EPA desde el 2002 y está a cargo del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Comunicaciones Multilingües. Como periodista, dirigió la oficina en Washington de dos periódicos puertorriqueños y ha laborado en varias agencias gubernamentales.

Como madre de cuatro hijas (incluyendo la menor que tiene seis años), siempre estoy buscando buenas películas que toda la familia pueda disfrutar. Sin embargo, el encontrar una película que satisfaga los gustos de todo el mundo no siempre es una labor sencilla. No obstante, sí he notado algo en el cine últimamente. Hollywood ha empezado a incorporar temas “verdes” (de perspectiva ecológica) en las películas para niños y han tenido éxito comercial. En ese caso, se puede ir al cine, disfrutar la experiencia y también sacar un mensaje positivo a la vez.

Este pasado fin de semana, fuimos toda la familia a ver WALL-E,
la película de dibujos computarizados animados sobre un robot cuyo nombre proviene de sus siglas en inglés para una unidad para compactar desperdicios – “Waste Allocation Load Lifter Earth-Class”. Dicho robot tiene la misión de limpiar toda la basura que cubre el planeta. No voy a hablar sobre la trama de la película. Debo confesar que cuando leí la crítica de la película, fui a verla con cierta vacilación. De primera intención, la película parecía algo lúgubre conforme a las normas tradicionales de películas infantiles. No obstante, a mi pequeña le encantó aunque no entendió su mensaje principal. A mis hijas mayores les conmovió la experiencia y algunas de nosotras también soltamos un par de lágrimas allí. A mi esposo le gustó también. Creo que fue una experiencia positiva para todos.

Otras películas con un mensaje ambientalista son Happy Feet y Hoot por ejemplo. Para los verdaderos amantes del cine ambiental en el área de Washington, recomiendo un ritual anual verde—el Festival de Cina Medioambiental en la Capital Nacional que usualmente se celebra en marzo.

Si va al cine, al parque o al zoológico para una jornada de diversión familiar, definitivamente debe hacerlo. Sin embargo, si prefiere utilizar su computadora para concienciar a los niños sobre la protección ambiental, o el reciclaje, o consejos de salud ambiental infantil, visítenos al www.epa.gov/espanol.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.