Working Towards Healthier Latino Communities

GinaMcCarthyAndDrRios Gina McCarthy and Dr. Elena Rios
Administrator McCarthy Speaks to the NHMA Board of Directors at the National Hispanic Medical Association 18th Annual Conference.

Administrator McCarthy Speaks to the NHMA Board of Directors at the National Hispanic Medical Association 18th Annual Conference.

 

The relationship between environmental protection and public health is at the heart of EPA’s mission and the agenda of the National Hispanic Medical Association. For years, Hispanic communities have been living in areas where the quality of the air they breathe and the water they drink does not meet national standards. In 2009, 70% of Hispanic children lived in areas with poor air quality.   All too often, Latinos work in occupations where they are exposed to greater environmental hazards and toxic chemicals. Furthermore, when it comes to health disparities, Latinos, particularly Puerto Ricans, are disproportionately affected by asthma attacks and asthma related deaths. Make no mistake. Climate change is very much a public health threat; it widens the health disparities we work to address. Continue reading

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A Healthy Collaboration to Improve Children’s Health

GinaMcCarthyAndDrRios Gina McCarthy and Dr. Elena Rios

When we travel to cities and communities large and small, we see first-hand the direct link between a healthy environment and healthy lives, especially for our country’s children. But as we observe Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s worth remembering that too many of our children, especially in minority communities, live in unhealthy environments that lead to unhealthy lives.

Scientific studies show that minority children who live, learn, and play in low-income communities are at a greater risk of environmental health problems such as asthma, lead poisoning, pesticides exposure, among others.

In 2009, approximately 70 percent of Hispanic children lived where air quality standards were subpar, contributing to higher incidences of asthma and other respiratory diseases. In fact, Puerto Rican American children have among the highest levels of reported current asthma as compared to all other racial and ethnicity groups. In the United States, nearly 1 in 10 school-aged children live with asthma every day, those most affected live in lower-income communities of color.

These health disparities are more than just hospital visits and more medicine. They also mean more missed school days, and a higher incidence of obesity due to less exercise.

Continue reading

Editor's Note: The views expressed here are intended to explain EPA policy. They do not change anyone's rights or obligations. You may share this post. However, please do not change the title or the content, or remove EPA’s identity as the author. If you do make substantive changes, please do not attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

EPA's official web site is www.epa.gov. Some links on this page may redirect users from the EPA website to specific content on a non-EPA, third-party site. In doing so, EPA is directing you only to the specific content referenced at the time of publication, not to any other content that may appear on the same webpage or elsewhere on the third-party site, or be added at a later date.

EPA is providing this link for informational purposes only. EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of non-EPA information provided by any third-party sites or any other linked site. EPA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies, internet applications or any policies or information expressed therein.