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Pedaling to a Sustainable Future During Bike-to-Work Month

2014 June 20

By Marco Evert

If you peeked into the EPA Seattle bike locker in May, you’d find a tidy corridor lined wall to wall with bikes, helmets, and child carriers. Our participation in Bike-to-Work Month extended to Alaska, Idaho and Oregon, with staff across EPA Pacific Northwest Region waking up and strapping on helmets for the morning bike ride to the office, some with kids in tow to drop off at daycare.

When we participated in Bike-to-Work Month, we joined a community of people committed to sustainability and we wanted to give our support. How do you show appreciation to a Seattle bike commuter? With coffee and healthy snacks, of course! We celebrated Bike-to-Work Day on May 16 by hosting a commute station with coffee, fruit, and treats in Seattle’s Centennial Park along Puget Sound. This has been a tradition of ours since 2003.

That day, ten EPA employees showed up bright and early before work to cheer on about 520 riders who stopped by on their morning commute. The station is a growing partnership between EPA, the neighborhood Whole Foods, the Seattle Art Museum, and its café, and Nuun Hydration. In addition to feeding and caffeinating the cyclists who stopped by, we highlight the efforts of Cascade Bicycle Club to make bike commuting accessible and safe in the Pacific Northwest. This organization hosts Bike-to-Work Day in Seattle and rallies organizations and businesses to sponsor commute stations.

 

Seattle area commuters show off their rides at EPA’s Bike-to-Work Day station.

Seattle area commuters show off their rides at EPA’s Bike-to-Work Day station.

 

Seattle area commuters show off their rides at EPA’s Bike-to-Work Day station.

Jonathan Freedman, an ecologist who has worked in the EPA Seattle office for 13 years, has spearheaded EPA’s sponsorship of a bike station since its inaugural year. “It gives EPA employees a chance to serve our community together as volunteers, and as bike commuters we can make friends with other workers who bike downtown,” Freedman said. “That’s part of the fun of it – we see some people year after year.” Since the first EPA commute station in 2003, Freedman estimates EPA has seen 6,000 bikers pass by our station, double or triple the number we would get in the early years.

EPA Pacific Northwest Region bike commute station volunteers (left to right): Annie Christopher, Hanady Kader, Jonathan Freedman, John Keenan, Rob Elleman, and Erik Peterson.

EPA Pacific Northwest Region bike commute station volunteers (left to right): Annie Christopher, Hanady Kader, Jonathan Freedman, John Keenan, Rob Elleman, and Erik Peterson.

When cyclists stopped by, we asked them to put pins on a map showing points of departure and destination, and we pinned our own routes as well. At the end of the morning, we had a colorful splash of pins covering Seattle.

A rider pins his trip on EPA’s commute map.

A rider pins his trip on EPA’s commute map.

Biking to work puts into practice our professional and personal commitment to sustainability. We thank all bike commuters, including EPA’s own, for pedaling during Bike-to-Work Month and throughout the year.

About the author: Marco Evert is a 2014 Federal Bike-To-Work Challenge intern. He is a junior at Seattle University in Washington State working towards a Public Affairs degree.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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