Comments on: Making Your Yard Wildlife-Friendly http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/ The EPA Blog Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:03:35 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: James Gurll http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25128 Fri, 22 Nov 2013 01:26:04 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25128 What Excellent post, Back yard of my Vacation Rental Costa Rica is a nice green space.Last Year I planted some trees, last month my son visit our propriety and discover a friendly community of scarlet macaw, I said community but they are a couple who share our house .We have to consider that We are not the owners of our house, our farm etc. Many other little animal still living on green zones next hour houses or in our houses, make a wildlife friendly yard is one of the best ideas, thanks for sharing.

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By: Rhinogutterguard http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25127 Tue, 19 Nov 2013 08:33:58 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25127 Excellent post!! You have shared great ways to make yard healthy and friendly. Vegetation is vital for establishment and I’ve been addicted since I got my first milkweed plant and saw a Queen butterfly on it. We had just moved into our brand new house with a brand new yard and I could hardly wait to start the landscaping. Thanks for sharing this post.

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By: John Glennon http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25126 Wed, 13 Nov 2013 23:07:52 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25126 Thanks for putting out this useful information about easy ways to be more environmentally friendly with landscaping. I think it is important to remember to try and make yard landscaping conform to the surrounding environment because it is better for animals in the area, helps with potential problems such as water runoff into streets, and finally helps conserve resources used on making your lawn different from what nature intended-which also saves money. Fully using natural resources by composting is another way to save money and avoid putting nasty chemicals in the ground.

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By: Barbara http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25125 Mon, 11 Nov 2013 15:14:37 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25125 At this time of year when all your neighbors are scouring their yards to clean up all their leaves and putting them out by the curb for pick up consider holding on to your leaves. I even add to my own leaves by accepting them from my neighbors. I remove all the leaves from my “showy” lawn areas but leave them in place in my beds and even add to the leaves that fall in areas I am trying to turn to “unlawn”. Leaf litter suppresses weeds, adds nutrients back into the soil and can sustain a lot of native insect life helpful for overwintering birds and next year’s healthy populations of native insects.

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By: Lina-EPA http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25124 Fri, 08 Nov 2013 14:41:36 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25124 Thanks, Sloan, for this useful information.
Lina-EPA

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By: Sloan http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/11/making-your-yard-wildlife-friendly/#comment-25123 Fri, 08 Nov 2013 05:21:12 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=22083#comment-25123 If you can, please feed the birds in winter. Those that stay are usually older and know they wouldn’t live if they migrated. Feeding them will insure they make it through the winter. Same for those that stay. Nothing humans do will change what is in their psyche. If they want to leave they will, but helping them along will do you and the birds a great service. Be certain that if you start feeding in the late fall / winter, that you keep feeding through the entire winter. It will be the end of the bird(s) who are depending on you. Another reason is, we never know what the winter may bring. If it is extremely cold or snowy, everything may be covered and they couldn’t find natural food. And remember, even though you think they are only eating your food, they are still eating whatever else they can find. We have a great need for more backyard birders. Last year was my first to do it, and I loved seeing them come in from the cold. I kept feeding in the spring so they had food for their nesting until the insects returned. If anyone wants to do more, check out Cornell University Project Feederwatch. It was fun for us, we’re doing it again this year.

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