Comments on: After the Flush http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/after-the-flush/ The EPA Blog Mon, 14 Dec 2015 16:24:21 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: bob http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/after-the-flush/#comment-4263 Fri, 07 Jun 2013 04:07:16 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/greeningtheapple/?p=10889#comment-4263 True. This, however, contradicts the general ‘life from water’- which cancels out by simpe simple probability calculations. Could time and chance result in sheer homeostatic consistancies,the hypoteneus side always being the sum of the opposite square and the interlinked and perrfecten natures of life.
Instance, ‘how did turtle get his shell?'; shouldn’t nature be taking from us, not vice v. ?
Perhaps a greater fingerprint has inscribed some wonders- likely so:
I’m better of thinking I’m man, not a mutated ape!
)

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By: Chris http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/after-the-flush/#comment-4262 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 17:20:06 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/greeningtheapple/?p=10889#comment-4262 It should be noted that they way Suffolk County has dealt with “decentralized wastewater” has left our bays dead or dying and our groundwater reaching the point of needing to be treated before consumption. Conventional cesspool and septic systems simply do nothing here on eastern Long Island. We need to move beyond the same old and catch up with technology if we would like to see our fisheries and tourism industries continue to thrive in the future. Failure to not act is not an option. The costs associated with inaction would eliminate commercial fishing in our bays and force the water authority to drill more and deeper wells and ultimately process all of our drinking water. All of those cost way more than updating the archaic method of putting our waste in a hole in the ground and hoping for the best. Suffolk County needs to quickly certify the use of advanced denitrifying on-site septic systems.

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By: Kristina http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/after-the-flush/#comment-4261 Thu, 21 Mar 2013 20:12:33 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/greeningtheapple/?p=10889#comment-4261 Ernest — thank you for your comment. It is clear you have thought about these issues. We appreciate your interest.

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By: Ernest Martinson http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/after-the-flush/#comment-4260 Tue, 19 Mar 2013 02:45:09 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/greeningtheapple/?p=10889#comment-4260 Decentralized wastewater treatment is a good fit because nature herself converts waste to resource in a decentralized fashion. Mimicking nature can be a natural way to minimize costs.
We assist the recycling of solid waste through separation of materials before processing. Likewise, we could assist nature in the recycling of wastewater through separation of greywater from sinks, tubs, and washing machines and of blackwater from flushing toilets. And when nature calls, we might even avoid unnaturally defecating into potable water by the prior replacement of the flush toilet with a compost toilet.

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