Comments on: Getting To Know Your Local Waterways http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/ The EPA Blog Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:45:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: G. B Ingram http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24149 Thu, 24 Jan 2013 05:47:14 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24149 I’m glad to hear of your success and ways to attain information of EPA. I live in Jackson Tn. by way of Denmark Tn. The area is filled with landfills and another one is in place. We have followed the process thru our local and state representatives with little assistance. No environmental justice. You think maybe you could assist us in setting up an organization or getting with the right people to assist us?

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By: Sports Probe http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24148 Sat, 10 Nov 2012 06:32:10 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24148 great post…
interesting.

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By: Eric Thomas http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24147 Tue, 23 Oct 2012 15:57:56 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24147 This is a great start. Like the quick mapping piece. Looks like the app will be useful as part of outreach presentations on related watershed projects and plans. Any idea of a timetable when the next assessment round (2012) of data would be incorporated into the application? As State/tribal assessments are approved by EPA, or as a nationwide update?

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By: Casey McLaughlin http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24146 Mon, 22 Oct 2012 18:22:01 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24146 EPA’s Kansas City Regional Office has established an Urban Stream Monitoring Network (KCWaters.org) in the Kansas City Metropolitan area that provides data and information about water quality in area streams. The network currently consists of 36 monitoring sites located in 12 different streams. Users select a station using a simple mapping interface and can view/download biological, sediment, water, or bacteria sampling information from the KCWaters.org database. The map includes locations for monitoring stations maintained by USGS (NWIS) and USEPA (STORET) and links directly to station data.

One of the key elements behind KCWaters.org is the power of providing data regarding water quality in a single location in a transparent and easily accessible format. For more information about the growing monitoring network, near-real time water quality information, or to contribute to the project, see KCWaters.org.

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By: Jeffery Robichaud http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24145 Mon, 22 Oct 2012 17:51:22 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24145 Good work Doug and company. Here at EPA Region 7 in Kansas City, we have worked really hard over the past year and a couple of projects, one which provides hourly real-time estimates of bacteria concentrations in 10 area streams, using satellite telemetry and in stream probes. We call it KCWaterBug and it is available for free both Iphone

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/kcwaterbug-1.0/id520633857?mt=8

and Droid
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.kcwaters.kcwaterbug&feature=nav_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDNd

It would be great if Hows My Waterway could provide links or interconnectedness to KCWaterBug for those streams where we have information.

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By: Sean Sheldrake http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/10/getting-to-know-your-local-waterways/#comment-24144 Fri, 19 Oct 2012 20:53:38 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=16825#comment-24144 Great article Doug! This is not only a great tool for recreational users, but first responders can benefit from this data immensely too. Fire and police divers need data on their local dive sites in addition to commercial divers and others. This is a great tool for improving worker safety as it makes existing information more accessible to a wider variety of groups, including a broad spectrum of divers — from FBI divers at Quantico to volunteer fire fighters in Texas. For more information on EPA’s contaminated water diving, see: http://www.facebook.com/EPADivers

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