Comments on: The Triple Bottom Line http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/07/the-triple-bottom-line/ The EPA Blog Mon, 14 Dec 2015 16:24:21 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Louise http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/07/the-triple-bottom-line/#comment-23837 Tue, 23 Oct 2012 08:41:13 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=15590#comment-23837 It is really an informative one. It is really true that the major bottom line is that.

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By: Garmin Vector http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/07/the-triple-bottom-line/#comment-23836 Mon, 30 Jul 2012 11:35:11 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=15590#comment-23836 No matter who much we deny it, but cutting the cost becomes a hidden consideration whenever we are doing something big. Somewhere deep down we are thinking about the costs too!

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By: Ernest Martinson http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/07/the-triple-bottom-line/#comment-23835 Mon, 23 Jul 2012 02:37:20 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=15590#comment-23835 The triple bottom line could collapse to a single bottom line with fiscal reform. For triple example:

Drying clothes on the line could save money as well as energy if coal subsidies were replaced with carbon taxes. Cheap coal is converted to cheap electricity energizing an appliance with energy conversion efficiency decidedly inferior to that clothes line. Just be careful it is not a hemp line in order not to provoke a swat team. And fifteen minutes in the sun to hang each load should not be shunned. It could eliminate the need for going nowhere on an indoor treadmill.

I suppose children could be protected if driven around in a military tank. And this could be be a teaching moment if a child asks why gas is so cheap and why other children in other lands are considered collateral damage. But alternative modes of transportation, not limited to small cars, could be better for the bottom line if crude oil subsidies were replaced with carbon taxes.

The reluctance to measure the full cost of a nuclear accident in monetary terms is understandable given the history of nuclear power. Utilities refused to buy into nuclear electricity until the full cost of a nuclear accident was lifted from their unwilling shoulders with the Price-Anderson Act. The latest denial of measuring the cost of nuclear power in monetary terms is the offering of federal guaranteed loans to nuclear power construction in Georgia.

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