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Tell us why Water Is Worth It

2012 March 20

By Travis Loop

As someone responsible for communications on water issues at EPA, I’m always working to explain how the agency’s actions matter to the American people. This year provides a unique opportunity to spark a national conversation about something that is vital to every single person – clean water.

2012 is the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, the nation’s law for protecting our most irreplaceable resource. This year we will certainly talk about the tremendous progress in reducing pollution since 1972, the many milestones along the way, the ways that the job is far from over and the tough challenges we face today and in the future.

But we don’t want to have a one-way conversation. We want to hear from you. Tell us why Water Is Worth It.

We’ve set up a variety of ways that people can participate in the conversation about clean water. Our webpage will be the central location for information, activities, news and networking.

I imagine many of you are active in social media so I encourage you to follow our accounts. You can find us on Facebook . You can follow us on Twitter @EPAwater. We want to have a nationwide digital dialogue so use the hashtag #cleanwater.

Keep watching the Greenversations blog for entries by EPA officials and staff on water issues. Provide your thoughts in the comments section and share the blog entry with others.

Throughout 2012, EPA’s Watershed Academy will be offering free webinars on aspects of the Clean Water Act, including an introduction, State Revolving Funds, the National Estuary Program and more. If you can’t join these webinars live, they are all archived for future access.

To tell the visual story of water, we’ve gathered photos of water submitted in 1972 and 2012. We encourage you to add to this gallery. It would be especially interesting to see new photos taken in the same location as 1972 to see how the water and surroundings have changed.

We also invite you to participate in the Rachel Carson contest. There are four categories: photography, essay, poetry and dance. Submissions are encouraged to focus on the properties of water – how it tastes, what it sounds like, how it feels – and what water means you.

We’re looking forward to hearing you tell us why Water Is Worth It.

About the author: Travis Loop is the communications director for the Office of Water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Editor’s Note: The opinions expressed in Greenversations are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed in Greenversations are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

10 Responses leave one →
  1. DR. ROBERT KAMANSKY, CAPTAIN , US ARMY permalink
    March 20, 2012

    I WILL BE CELEBRATING THIS 40 TH ANNIVERSARY OF WATER DAY AT CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY, ORANGE, CALIF. THIS IS EXCITING AS I HAVE A CERTIFICATE IN WATERSHED MANAGEMENT FROM CHAPMAN U. WE HAVE COME A LONG WAY BABY FROM THE DARK AGES OF WATER MANAGEMENT. DR. KAMANSKY

  2. เครื่องปั่นไฟขนาดเล็ก permalink
    March 20, 2012

    Thanks for the article. This keeps me informed about the topic.
    Wow!!! That’s a good idea and I very like it!

  3. Gwendolyn permalink
    March 20, 2012

    Greetings: The “About Contest” and the FAQ pages have different deadlines for this contest: June 1 and June 10, respectively. Which is correct?

  4. Travis permalink
    March 20, 2012

    It is July 1

  5. Tom Rothschild permalink
    March 20, 2012

    I believe we are more aware of the sacred trinity of air, water, and vegetation, than ever before. We have been exploring the Moon and the other planets and their moons with some obvious conclusions. The main one is where we have found water, we have found little or no atmosphere. Also, no vegetation, as of this writing, has been made public as a relic or something surviving. Should we assume these heavenly bodies release gases which make up a habitable atmosphere, which can support vegetation? I think not. I believe the vegetation is the main reason for an atmosphere released from the ground it grows on. And, to do this the vegetation needs heat, sunlight, and most certainly, water. This is my conclusion in a nutshell.

  6. kiyohisa tanada permalink
    March 21, 2012

    The water is stable
    The water has a big change as “a material”,
    The water has good thermal conductivity
    The water is indispensable to production of food.
    It uses “the water” to wash a thing
    The material which is the most important on the earth
    We must take good care of this water
    I think so.

  7. Anonymous permalink
    March 23, 2012

    simply because its THE WATER! which is the most utilized substance on earth …and this makes it valuable… because of its innumerable uses!

  8. Wyland permalink
    March 23, 2012

    On behalf of the Wyland Foundation, I am proud to help celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act. This is a vital time in history to discover the essential value and wonder of our nation’s water resources and work together to ensure future generations can carry on our nation’s legacy of environmental stewardship.

  9. Christina Catanese permalink
    March 26, 2012

    We hope you’ll also check out the Healthy Waters Blog, EPA’s blog all about water issues in the Mid Atlantic Region! We’ll be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act here as well: http://blog.epa.gov/healthywaters/

  10. Luc Bizet permalink
    April 3, 2012

    I find your article, very interesting. :)
    Thank, cordially.
    Luc Bizet

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