Comments on: Spring Cleaning? What About Air Ducts? http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/ The EPA Blog Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:52:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: garry http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23105 Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:47:08 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23105 A lot of people think they got a clean house.With dirty air ducts you never have.

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By: sam kelly http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23104 Mon, 31 Mar 2014 10:33:57 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23104 Air duct cleaning has never been shown to actually prevent health problems. Be familiar with general indoor air quality tips to reduce risk control pollution sources in the home, change filters regularly and adjust humidity.

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By: james http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23103 Wed, 01 May 2013 18:14:36 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23103 Thank you very much for this article. I did take a lot of thinking and could make my marketing strategy more precise.

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By: how to make money http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23102 Mon, 02 Jul 2012 15:26:05 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23102 really useful.thanks

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By: Russell Olinsky http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23101 Wed, 25 Apr 2012 05:17:09 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23101 1. Have both the supply and return air ducts inspected for problems before cleaning. Examine for air leaks, daylight (for sections outside), defects (including disconnected, restricted or blocked ductwork), deteriorating or improperly connected flex ducts, openings to building cavities (where air and contaminants from wall or ceiling cavities or gaps/cracks in the foundation could enter or exit), water or other stains, debris (including construction or remodeling), biological contaminants including fungal growth and lumber yard wood fungi, insects, rodent dung, pet hair, etc.), shedding or unlined/exposed fibrous glass, asbestos or other insulation (including vermiculate), areas with no or insufficient insulation, sewer pipes, chemicals and unusual odors (including deodorizers). Perform needed repairs before the air ducts are cleaned (if required).
2. Have the heating and air conditioning unit inspected annually for proper operation by a professional. Also have the blower, motor, cooling coils and unit inspected to determine if they need cleaning or repairs. The coils, blower, gas lines and heat exchanger (for gas units) insulating liner, drain line, condensation drain pan, emergency drain pan (for attic mounted units) should also be inspected for problems. This includes areas that have clogged or leaking condensate water or water stains, gas, exhaust leaks or insufficient combustion, shedding or insufficient insulating liner, air leaks/gaps, sump pump cloggage, debris or fungal growth on coils, motor or other areas. Have any required performed before the air dusts are cleaned.

If the ducts and unit need cleaning, choose a reputable company that has the proper equipment and can show you that the ducts are sufficiently cleaned afterwards. Many companies cannot clean deep inside long runs of the air ducts. Occasionally I’ve found IAQ problems exacerbated by duct cleaning when the companies loosened matted debris or caused insulation liner to break up and release fine, respirable fibrous glass.

Russell B. Olinsky, M.S. Environmental Specialist
Helping to make homes and workplaces healthier!

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By: Make Money Online From Home http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23100 Mon, 09 Apr 2012 10:41:16 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23100 I was doing a research online for my case study and finally found this website with this spectacular content. I am looking for additional information I can put on my website and start a new topic for people to read. Than you for posting this.

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By: bob http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23099 Sun, 08 Apr 2012 15:24:50 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23099 I cleaned out my ducts as I was having some alergy issues yet i have no alegies. I had the dust tested and found high levels of Barium, Aluminum and sulfure. I urge everyone to test for these toxins around there home as they are highly toxic.

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By: Richard Lantz http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23098 Fri, 30 Mar 2012 14:15:57 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23098 When picking a duct cleaning provider, be sure and visit NADCA: The HVAC Inspection, Maintenance and Restoration Association, otherwise known as the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA), was formed in 1989 as a non-profit association of companies engaged in the cleaning of HVAC systems. Its mission was to promote source removal as the only acceptable method of cleaning and to establish industry standards for the association.

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By: kiyohisa tanada http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2012/03/spring-cleaning-2/#comment-23097 Wed, 28 Mar 2012 11:38:28 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=13614#comment-23097 The cleaning of the air duct is particularly effective for “an allergic patient”.
I clean using “the cleaning function of the air-conditioner”.
In addition, I attach “a catch sheet” of the dust collecting to a mop and clean.
The present catch sheet is well-done.
I take the dust without injuring a thing to wipe off.
This is my cleaning method.

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