Comments on: Working for Children's Health and Environmental Justice http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/ The EPA Blog Thu, 02 Jul 2015 12:58:31 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Fadi http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19848 Tue, 21 Dec 2010 08:09:35 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19848 I totally agree with your point. Let us raise our children into critical thinkers. They will be our future leaders.

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By: Justin http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19847 Tue, 14 Dec 2010 22:22:53 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19847 I think Alyssa makes a very good point. Kids programs in lower income areas that would make them, not only educated in the environment, but participate in their own community can bring out adult leaders in that community to improve it as a whole. Not to mention, the youth are going to be the adults before we know it and it is essential to educate them on the importance of maintaining our environment and making it safe for their own children one day.
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Justin

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By: Alyssa Taylor http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19846 Sat, 16 Oct 2010 20:18:41 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19846 Poor regions, where kids are the most at risk for these types of environmental hazards, tend to also have high rate of people moving in and out. This movement can lead to a lack of community and potentially a lack of respect for the environment in which they live. Therefore, developing programs where kids can participate and lead environmental initiatives may help create a sense of pride in their community.By doing this, not only will environmental issues within the area be addressed, but the youth involved in creating the changes will have a stronger desire to maintain these changes. Youth involvment may be the most sustainable way to address these issues.

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By: linda http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19845 Fri, 23 Jul 2010 08:12:58 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19845 I can’t help but agree to your post. It is really the children who are essentially made to suffer the after-effects. It is through your this types of posts that we are made aware of the effects of waste to our community.

Regards and I hope you succeed in your campaign.

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By: Michael E. Bailey http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19844 Mon, 19 Jul 2010 01:22:44 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19844 The CDC has just wrapped up a project that covered several months of local community conversations on toxic chemical exposures. The results of these local meetings will go up to a federal CDC Panel on Toxic Chemical Exposures for a federal program that aims to limit people to exposures. A tool kit was created to aid the local discussions. Any group or organization could participate including informal groups of neighbogrs who just came together. A similar program would be one way EPA could reach out to disadvantaged communities. Outreach materials also need to be in the predominmant language used in each communihty as well as English, and be in alternate formats–large print, braile, American Sign Language, and websites need to be accessible to card readers. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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By: armansyahardanis http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19843 Mon, 12 Jul 2010 17:33:12 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19843 Excuse me, Mr. Grevatt. You just only to see American Children, and, OMG, your feeling is skeptics depend reality. Compared, please…, with our children here, thousands kilometers from your home. Different….
In our city maybe not seeing, because The Health City Administration activating to build and to maintain the children, but different by in the village. Beside skills, performances, we need fun and infrastructures. I hope a hundred years later our children from the villages could play in NBA, meanwhile your children as a healthy consultants in our country.

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By: La Donna http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19842 Mon, 12 Jul 2010 17:14:33 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19842 I think EPA can best institutionalize working for Environmental Justice and Children’s health by during community outreach and education in low-income. Teach the children and their parents how to be their own best advocates which will inspire the change that is needed in the communities of color. Partner with the schools to change the foods the children eat. Partner with the schools to include environmental education in the schools. Change can be effective and inspired by the people mose effected.

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By: ken beets http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/07/childrens-health-and-ej/#comment-19841 Mon, 12 Jul 2010 15:36:13 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=3280#comment-19841 Dear Peter: Most of what I have said falls on deaf ears, however I will not give up. The chlorine that is added to our drinking water is a killer! We have a system that we have offered for free to anyone who would like to try. We use no Chemicals and can purify all the water that passes through our system (at a much lower cost) and remove all impurities and de-scale at the same time up to 233 gpm at 1/2 the cost of our competition. Would you be that one person to try? Best of a future in your chosen field. Thanks Ken

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