Comments on: Talking Asthma for the Science Notebook http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/ The EPA Blog Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:52:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Ronin Athletics http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19330 Wed, 27 Feb 2013 14:34:03 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19330 I practice martial arts and I suffer from Asthma. I pay attention to the air quality details and I take my medication, and I am fortunate to have the ability to maintain my cardiovascular health through this type of regimen.

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By: Bollywood Music Reviews http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19329 Wed, 29 Dec 2010 06:47:32 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19329 really amazing information sharing and i just like your blog because of informative content.

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By: Richard Friedel http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19328 Sun, 19 Dec 2010 16:07:09 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19328 A relevant but strangely ignored or not generally known fact about asthma is that the change between weak (asthmatic) and strong (healthy) breathing is dependent on abdominal muscle tension. Slackening the muscles here causes abysmally weak and asthmatic breathing. Training the muscles, for example by “abdominal hollowing” (see Web articles) produces an antiasthmatic effect. Abdominal muscle tension plays a prominent part in Asian martial arts. I tend to breathe asthmatically after an evening meal or in pollen-laden air.
So it is fair to assume that there is a natural breathing spectrum with an asthmatic tendency at one end and Ku Fu or Karate breathing at the other end. For a few words on the Japanese version of Asian breathing see http://www.lrz.de/~s3e0101/webserver/webdata/OBT.pdf
Breathing powerfully into my lower abdomen with tensed muscles provides an effective cure for me. But then I’ve always been sceptical about medical wisdom on asthma: such a paradoxical and doctor-baffling increase in the last 40 years with modern inhalers. Respectfully, Richard Friedel

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By: Jim http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19327 Tue, 18 May 2010 11:07:30 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19327 The children of the world will be facing the global problem of finding fresh water. I suspect my great grandchildren will not be able to shower, wash cloths, dishes, and swim as our generation was able too.

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By: Michael E. Bailey http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19326 Mon, 17 May 2010 05:08:01 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19326 I have seen a study by California Air Resources Board that points to diesel particulates as the main health problem today in air pollution. More cases of breathing and heart problems can be found in people who live near busy freeways, rail yards, truck terminals, and ports. Many of these persons are disabled and lower income and have to live in these areas because the cost of housing is less there. We should work toward cleaner fuels. Move a way from diesel like we did lead in gasoline and move toward hydrogen powered or all-electric powered vehicles with solar power used to manufacture the hydrogen and to recharge the batteries of all-electric powered vehicles. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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By: pjpbustar@yahoo.es http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19325 Fri, 14 May 2010 21:32:50 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19325 Gracias a la EPA por difundir informacion acerca de los problemas mas importantes que nos preocupan a todos,unsaludo desde ESPAÑA-MADRID.ciao

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By: Tom http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19324 Fri, 14 May 2010 00:05:19 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19324 Oh, silly me. I thought it had something to do with this:
http://www.epa.gov/glo/fr/20100119.pdf

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By: melissaEPA http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19323 Thu, 13 May 2010 17:08:39 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19323 Hi Mark, you’re absolutely right volcanic dust would also be a trigger for asthmatics. Here’s some feedback from our air research expert:

Asthmatics have airways that are “twitchy” and often are sensitive to specific airborne materials like allergens from cats, dust mites, or plant fragments. Often these folks also are hyper-responsive to nonspecific materials including all sorts of dusts that may trigger “mechanical” receptors in the airways – responding just to the the presence or deposition of a dust particle(s) on the receptor(s) in the throat. The reaction of the airways (asthma reaction) is very much like that from an inhaled irritant like those found in urban air pollution. So with volcanic dust, even small amounts that you may not even see except as a vague haze may be enough to trigger these mechanical receptors and cause airway narrowing and breathing discomfort. How do we minimize an asthma attack in these instances – staying indoors, wearing a dust mask (found in hardware stores) – even if only a surgical mask is available to stop the largest particles – can help those with asthma. Physical exertion such as running when the air is affected would not be wise. If you have an inhaler prescribed to you,keep it handy.

More information on asthma can be found here http://www.epa.gov/asthma/

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By: melissaEPA http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19322 Thu, 13 May 2010 14:16:15 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19322 Thanks all! The scientists and experts who contributed their knowledge and created the Asthma Science Notebook did a wonderful job and i’m glad to have had a little role in pointing you to it all via this blog :-)

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By: melissaEPA http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/05/talking-asthma/#comment-19321 Thu, 13 May 2010 14:04:16 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=2870#comment-19321 Hi Tom,
May is Asthma Awareness Month and World Asthma Day was May 4.

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