Skip to content

EPA launches its “Healthy Waters of the Mid-Atlantic” blog

2010 May 14

I’d like to invite you to our new “Healthy Waters of the Mid-Atlantic” blog, which is designed to bring new voices and perspectives to our work in restoring and protecting water resources in EPA’s Mid-Atlantic region. “Healthy Waters” is one of the Mid Atlantic Region’s top priorities, and your ideas will help advise EPA teams working on the next generation of water protection practices. You should expect a new entry each week.

“Healthy Waters” recognizes that it takes partnerships to build on our progress in achieving clean water. By engaging and commenting on this blog, you will have a unique opportunity to help us tackle some of the most current and challenging water protection issues of the 21st century.

If you would like to learn more about our Healthy Waters Priority and its four areas of focus – agriculture, land, mining and transportation – please see our Healthy Waters Website.

Thanks for visiting. We value your feedback and look forward to reading your comments.

About the author: Shawn M. Garvin is regional administrator of EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Region.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed in Greenversations are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

4 Responses leave one →
  1. CARLOS RAMO permalink
    May 14, 2010

    LES REUEGO QUE LLEGUE ESTO A QUIEN CORRESPONDA: ES REFERENTE AL DERRAME EN EL GOLFO DE MEXICO: LA CAMARA DEBE SE COMO UNA CAPSULA ESPACIAL O SEA EN FORMA DE CONO SUS MEDIDAS SON: BASE 6X6MTROS
    ALTURA 4,5MTROS
    PUNTA 2X2MTROS
    TRES ESCOTILLAS DE 1 MTROS CON UNA VALVULA

    ESTA CAMARA TIENE TRES ESCOTILLAS CON SUS RESPECTIVAS VALAVULAS Y EN LA BASE SEIS 6 ARPONES QUE SE CLAVAN EN EL FONDO DEL OCEANO PARA SU SUJECION, SE BAJARA CON TRES MANGUERAS CONECTADAS AL LLEGAR AL FONDO Y YA SUJETA LAS ESCOTILLAS SE CIERRAN DE A UNA,

  2. Michael E. Bailey permalink
    May 17, 2010

    There is a big problem with pollution in storm runoff and in dry weather water runoff. The storm water system in the mid-Atlantic Region is also a lot older and in greater need of maintenance, repair, and replacement. So this will be one critical problem. Other states are also working hard on this issue. The San Diego Region of the California Water Quality Control Board has passed new water quality regulations that require the near elimination of dry weather water runoff in all except a few limited situations like using water by the fire department to put out fires. They are getting tougher on storm water runoff. With new construction or major redevelopment, there must be included systems to capture rain water for reuse or treatment on site before it goes into storm drains and there must be porus walks and drives that allow water to go into the soil instead of runoff. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

  3. Sonya Tedford permalink
    May 17, 2010

    Lisa,
    Please stop the dispersants in the GOM……or ot least have BP use something that is more environmentally friendly.
    If not for us , then for the children of the earth.

  4. Dan permalink
    May 31, 2010

    I agre Lisa – this needs to be stoped NOW!

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS