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Step Into Spring – – The 2010 Philadelphia International Flower Show

2010 March 2

This year has gone on record as the snowiest winter in Philadelphia. With the aftermath of back to back snowstorms (huge piles of snow and icy spots) still very much a part of daily life, the prospect of early Spring seems like a fantasy. Yet, even though it’s still February, Spring will come early – as it does every year – in the form of the Philadelphia International Flower Show.

The Philadelphia Flower Show is an annual rite of Spring that brings together garden exhibitors from all over the world, transferring the huge floor of the Pennsylvania Convention Center into a magical Spring display. It is a sight to behold, taking us from winter to spring as we step into a wonderland of gardens, plants, and floral designs. Billed as the world’s largest indoor flower exhibit and the oldest (1829) in the nation, the Flower Show annually attracts more than 250,000 visitors from all over the world. With its international appeal and audience, it’s very fitting that the theme of 2010 show is “Passport to the World.”

Traditional gardens, despite their beauty and appeal, can cause serious harm to the environment, including pesticide and nutrient runoff, and introduction of invasive species. That’s why since 1993, EPA has used this wonderful venue to educate gardeners on techniques that protect the environment and at the same time create beautiful gardens.

Each year, using native plants, and recycled materials, the EPA flower show team of volunteers designs, constructs, and creates an exhibit that vividly demonstrates the beauty and practicality of native plants, sustainable water usage, and beneficial landscaping techniques. In keeping with the Show’s 2010 international focus, our exhibit depicts an “East Meets West” theme, showcasing a Japanese style tea-house, set in a picturesque North American native garden. Our thousands of visitors are sure to be inspired by the splashes of colors and exotic textures of evergreens, azaleas, pitcher plants, phlox and a host of other native species as they adorn a cedar walkway and tea-house. The exhibit appears to be floating above a reflective pools.

As a Communications Coordinator and a Flower Show volunteer, I have coordinated outreach and education for the Flower Show team for more than 10 years. And while our exhibits always carry messages of sustainability, it is amazing to see unique exhibits year after year, conveying environmental messages in a special and beautiful way.

If you’re in the area, stop by and see for yourself the beauty and environmental benefits of green gardening. The 2010 Philadelphia International Flower Show runs from Sunday, February 28th through March 7th at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
Whether you are an aspiring gardener, an experienced gardener, or you just like to enjoy the sights of Spring, there’ll be plenty to see, learn, and enjoy.

See you at the Flower Show.

About the Author: Bonnie Turner-Lomax came to EPA Region’s mid-Atlantic Region in 1987 and has held several positions throughout the Region. She is currently the Communications Coordinator for the Environmental Assessment & Innovation Division.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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8 Responses leave one →
  1. armansyahardanis permalink
    March 2, 2010

    Nice to read your post. Very difficulty if we are seeing and enjoying with the flowers, without using right taste from our heart. I’d remembered when I acrossed the jungle, our team destructed orchid on the trees. Now, I am regret. Congratulation for your show….

  2. Michael E. Bailey permalink
    March 2, 2010

    That sounds like a great show. It sounds like you have a great exhibit at the show. There is not enough outreach that can be done to get the word out to professional and recreational gardeners on the dangers of insecticides, herbacides, fertilizers and water runoff. There cannot be too much outreach on the virtues of organic gardening, composting and recycled water, and rain collection for garden use. The California Solid Waste Management Division has a lot of information on the insects and etc. that live in compost piles. They scare people off from composting, but they naturallybelong in the compost pile and form key mechanisms that turn leaves and grass clippings into valuable fertilizer. You can compost food scraps and ,if you are concerned abouts flies and rats, it can be done in an enclosed container using worms. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

  3. Anonymous permalink
    March 3, 2010

    Four Seasons Stepping Stones (set of 4) Embrace the seasons with our Four Seasons Stepping Stones (set of 4).

  4. avoid bankruptcy permalink
    March 3, 2010

    yeah i agree with you and will surely give a visit i just love flowers

  5. Al Bannet permalink
    March 4, 2010

    Because of the demands of a relentlessly growing human population, fresh flowers are being replaced by very colorful artificial boquets that don’t need to be watered or fertilized, only dusted once in a while. Sad.

  6. flowers permalink
    March 19, 2010

    “That sounds like a great show. It sounds like you have a great exhibit at the show. There is not enough outreach that can be done to get the word out to professional and recreational gardeners on the dangers of insecticides, herbacides, fertilizers and water runoff. There cannot be too much outreach on the virtues of organic gardening, composting and recycled water, and rain collection for garden use. The California flowers Solid Waste Management Division has a lot of information on the insects and etc. that live in compost piles. They scare people off from composting, but they naturally belong in the compost pile and form key mechanisms that turn leaves and grass clippings into valuable fertilizer. You can compost food scraps and ,if you are concerned abouts flies and rats, it can be done in an enclosed container using worms. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.”

    I think that’s right
    Really nice article I loved him I would use

  7. Nike Dunk High Premium permalink
    June 7, 2010

    Hmm, a valuable and nice blog. Luck to communicate with you.

  8. tony permalink
    June 21, 2010

    I love flowers

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