Comments on: Growing Up with Urban Waters http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/ The EPA Blog Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:03:35 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Garage kits http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17320 Tue, 21 Sep 2010 18:05:46 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17320 arent they supposed to be dirty

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By: Jewelry Buyers Houston http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17319 Sat, 12 Jun 2010 17:40:40 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17319 I agreed with this article of Wayne Davis, if we growing up with Urban Waters, then we can solve our drinking water problem. If we does not look at this problem then in future it’s going to be a big problem. but , from today we are looking for the Urban water resources and try to clean and free from pollution then we can solve a big problem. again than ks Wayne Davis for your environmental article.

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By: Sarah http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17318 Tue, 01 Jun 2010 03:15:34 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17318 Eleven brands of bottled water contain levels of chromium 6 that don’t meet standards now under consideration by the state, according to according to tests released Wednesday by Los Angeles County.

The county’s Environmental Toxicology Bureau also released results of 990 tests of tap water at county government facilities, revealing that drinking water drinking water supply of water available to animals for drinking supplied via nipples, in troughs, dams, ponds and larger natural water sources; an insufficient supply leads to dehydration; it can be the source of infection, e.g. leptospirosis, salmonellosis, or of poisoning, e.g. at some locations contains levels of chromium 6 and arsenic that would not meet state and federal standards under consideration.

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By: Margaret Frisbie http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17317 Thu, 25 Feb 2010 21:00:47 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17317 Wayne’s experience at River Park is one that many people are sharing throughout nearly 100 communities along the Chicago River system. Once a trash-strewn, sewage-filled back alley for Chicago and neighboring suburbs, today the Chicago River is alive with activity above and below the water with 70 species of fish, 60 species of birds and a host of other creatures like beavers, muskrats and people who are paddling, fishing, birdwatching, rowing crew, dining, or just enjoying the view.

Sadly, while the water looks lovely on the surface, unlike in other cities, there is still bacterial pollution from sewage treatment being dumped into the river by the billion gallons daily. That pollution from human sewage contains potentially harmful pathogens that especially endanger at-risk populations like children or the immuno-compromised who access the river at public parks and boat docks and do not know the river can make them sick.

The time has come for new water quality standards for the Chicago River to protect them.

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By: Wayne Davis http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17316 Thu, 25 Feb 2010 17:47:15 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17316 Thank you, Ann. The trees always attracted people to that area, especially the large low hanging willows. Watching people with their fishing poles line the area is a welcome change from years ago. These “biological indicators” show promise as do studies of fish and other aquatic life. While there has been a great deal of progress made over the past several years more will be welcome to further restoring this, and other, urban waterways.

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By: Wayne Davis http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17315 Thu, 25 Feb 2010 14:55:24 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17315 Thank you for your kind comment and I look forward to learning about experiences that others have living in urban waters communities.

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By: Wayne Davis http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17314 Thu, 25 Feb 2010 14:53:35 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17314 You make a good point, Lindsey. The Northside College Prep High School is another good example of communities benefiting from urban waters aned vice versa. Your alma mater was built after I left that area and is along the North Shore Channel about a half mile north of River Park. North Park University and Von Steuben High School are adjacent to North Branch upstream of River Park.
There are probably countless clean-ups and study projects that Northside College Prep contributed along this urban waterway to both better understand and to improve it’s conditions. I hope that other schools and communities follow it’s example. Thanks for your feedback!

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By: Ann http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17313 Thu, 25 Feb 2010 13:03:22 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17313 I really like your post. It is a very cool place, many trees that surrounds you and a very clean river at the side. Great post.

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By: Al Bannet http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17312 Wed, 24 Feb 2010 21:27:08 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17312 armansyahardanis:

Jakarta and all large cities around the World need a system of 100% safe recycling of all waste and garbage. Then much fewer people will be getting sick from the pollution.

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By: Lindsey Realmuto http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2010/02/growing-up-with-urban-waters/#comment-17311 Wed, 24 Feb 2010 14:07:21 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1328#comment-17311 As a quick fact check, the adjacent high school to the River Park is Northside College Prep, which has access to the River Park literally in the back of the school…where I think the picture you used came from. Von Steuben High School is close but a few blocks away. I went to Northside College Prep and the River Park was completed while I was still in high school there.
Otherwise, I agree that the River Park is an amazing example of a restoration project and as a school we participated in a lot of Chicago River clean-up days which always demonstrated, for me, how polluted the river had become and the desperate need for restoration projects such as this one. Being able to enjoy this path during high school was a privilege and I still take pleasure in returning to the area with friends who still live in Chicago. My only critique of the project is that in some areas they installed solar panel lights, which have not been maintained and therefore don’t generate electricity to light the path. Sustainability for projects like this should always be considered.

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