Comments on: Science Wednesday: Sustainability Through the Eyes of a Chemist http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/ The EPA Blog Thu, 30 Jul 2015 11:15:11 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Ala ud din Jutt http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16149 Wed, 25 Jun 2014 11:03:44 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16149 Nice post. I like it. This is useful for me. I have more knowledge about it

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By: Johnny R. http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16148 Fri, 20 Nov 2009 15:16:34 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16148 Sustainable growth on a World of limited resources is an oxymoron. To put it another way: A growing economy on a shrinking planet has no future. But apparently growth is an instinct, so people are driven to expand their economic power regardless of fatal consequences. Thus, the coal fired power plants and jet planes pump out pollution relentlessly – until the biosphere undergoes toxic collapse and life on Earth self-terminates.

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By: sara http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16147 Fri, 20 Nov 2009 05:40:25 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16147 Great post!
Thank you so for sharing an important knowledge about the sustainable development in future. It just like a challenge, to “decouple” material progress and the environment, by putting them on parallel, complementary and hopefully mutually reinforcing tracks. In simple terms, this means maximising economic growth and environmental improvement at the same time.

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By: The Refinishing Touch http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16146 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 20:08:18 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16146 A really interesting post, thank you. One thing that’s clear about future sustainability developments is the enormous role played by science (and agencies such as the EPA). This work sounds fascinating and as a company that strives to work with chemicals that have a smaller environmental footprint, we’ll be keeping an eye on future posts and your updates on Sustainable Chemistry.

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By: Johnny R. http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16145 Thu, 19 Nov 2009 16:17:41 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16145 Even if 100% of all chemical engineering were made green, the ever-growing population would overwhelm and strip the remaining wilderness and whatever is left of the balance of Nature would be destroyed. How many people can the Earth support, and who wants to live on such an overcrowded, suburbanized, agribusiness, tree-farm planet just so a few people can be fabulously rich?

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By: armansyahardanis http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/11/science-wednesday-sustainability-through-the-eyes-of-a-chemist/#comment-16144 Wed, 18 Nov 2009 16:54:55 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1205#comment-16144 I skeptic to you about sustainable chemistry.
Here, swamp drainage reclamation in Sumatera and Kalimantan, are cutting the molecular of biology, chemistry and physics of the forest and its soil. That’s paradox. We are cutting but you are trying to build.
I’m sorry, here, we are destructing the planet that billion years evoluted.

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