Comments on: Science Wednesday: Learning to Keep Children Healthy http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/ The EPA Blog Sun, 28 Jun 2015 17:19:52 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Hasselle http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15996 Wed, 04 Sep 2013 16:05:12 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15996 Yeah, I absolutely agree with it. I want my kid to be healthy. Of course, no mom wants to have a weak and malnourished child.

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By: lkoybir@gmail.com http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15995 Tue, 12 Mar 2013 05:58:09 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15995 I will right away grab your rss as I can not find your email subscription link or newsletter service. Do you’ve any? Please let me know so that I could subscribe. Thanks.

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By: fresh healthy vending scam http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15994 Fri, 13 Jul 2012 09:01:02 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15994 Fresh Healthry Vending Workplace Wellness Programs.The epidemic of obesity among children and adults is placing the need for more accessible healthy choices. Linking this surge in weight gain to vending machines has prompted a market for health vending choices.

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By: B煤squeda de Agentes de Bienes Ra铆ces Hermosa Mar http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15993 Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:27:55 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15993 A powerful share, I just given this onto a colleague who was doing somewhat evaluation on this. And he actually purchased me breakfast because I found it for him.. smile. So let me reword that: Thnx for the treat! But yeah Thnkx for spending the time to discuss this, I feel strongly about it and love studying extra on this topic. If doable, as you grow to be expertise, would you mind updating your blog with extra particulars? It is highly helpful for me. Huge thumb up for this blog put up!

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By: Ronald http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15992 Sun, 18 Apr 2010 01:49:57 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15992 I always was one to lean towards the side of thinking parents getting over worried to the point of hyper santization for their kids was a worrysome and growing obsession. I still believe parents have a built in capacity to know without worrying how to take care of their kids while growing up – which involves allowing them to have play time, giving them room, not worrying too much.

But I agree now with recent issues going on in manufacturing, mass production and the amounts of chemicals that can and often do get into places they were not really intended to be (or even some cases where they did)

There are positive Electronic Alternative Devices on the market too which can help aid in not worrying about certain types of toxins and chemicals found in smoke, smog, etc. I think it is good to use these to provide good clean air, but still let kids play and make a mess… some germ exposure is important, as is it important for the brain I think to not feel stress as a child and the ability to play as carefree as possible, having a safe environment provided by a parent can do that.

Be aware, but don’t get an unhealthy stressful obsession that I think can be just as damaging.

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By: Andy http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15991 Wed, 17 Mar 2010 11:16:48 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15991 More care and should be understand what product that save for children is important.

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By: Jennifer Thomas http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15990 Fri, 12 Mar 2010 17:02:41 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15990 Keeping my 2 kids healthy is number one in my book. Thanks for the great content that will help me accomplished this goal. One way I try to keep my kids from getting a cold is to keep their noses cleaned out. I bought a nasal aspirator to remove the mucus out of their little noses when they are starting to get stuffy. Best Regards- Jenn

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By: bill reagan http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15989 Sun, 07 Mar 2010 02:02:24 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15989 If you want to keep children healthy – as well as yourself – then feel free to smoking everywhere but with electronic cigarettes. No second hand smoke – or anything for that matter.

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By: steve johnson http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15988 Mon, 07 Dec 2009 17:11:12 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15988 The concerns about lead (or PCB) in paint and plastic always fail to underline the real issue. Material bound in paint and plastic is fully fixed. It may carry lead as part of its make up but the lead is ordinarily not mobile. Only when the paint or plastic degrades does a problem arise. As a product degrades anything in it becomes subject to mobilization.

Coatings and plastic are actually protected by use of lead and PCBs. That was why they were used in the first place. They were used to make the expensive paints and long lived plastics. Neglect is the real source of the problem. It creates a problem where none previously existed. Because neglect is so likely to happen, lead and PCBs are eventually mobilized. Because of that use of lead and PCBs, particularly in outdoor type products are considered an unnecessary hazard.

In real life you can see potential problems for yourself. Plastic or paint that is faded, crumbly and ravels is suspect. It happens from weathering. If that has happened the plastic dusts and paint chips and peels. Plastic/paint dustings get on your hands upon touch and eventually some gets to the mouth. If lead had been used during manufacture, then the dust/peeled paint is not just a carrier but a distributor of health risks. Because the carrier broken down it can much more easily distribute and convey its burden of lead (or PCB) to the body during digestion.

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By: Michael E. Bailey http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/10/science-wednesday/#comment-15987 Fri, 30 Oct 2009 06:33:32 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1184#comment-15987 What you are doing is great work. I can remember when the toys had lead paint and also sharp and tiny parts that would easily fall off if not handled right. I think a major problem for children today is the actions of their parents. Some parents smoke an incredible amount of cigarettes every day and the kids in the house get to breath in all the second hand smoke. Then there is a new thing called “e-cigarettes” that is a battery operated device in the shape of a real cigarette that generates fumes to breath in and that smell like a real cigarette, and that the FDA has determined has many of the same types of cancer causing agents as a real cigarette. Kids might think e-cigarettes won’t hurt them if they used them. Then there are the real cigarette lighters made to look like childrens’ toys and which kids can easily and sometimes do mistake for toys, resulting in fires, deaths, and injuries. And some parents don’t know what makes a good diet so we have an epidemic of overweight kids that may have some serious health problems later on. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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