Comments on: Greening History http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/08/greening-history/ The EPA Blog Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:52:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Jack Liebenthal http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/08/greening-history/#comment-15057 Sat, 03 Oct 2009 16:56:41 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1038#comment-15057 This is good work. As one interested in light pollution, which should be a greater priority in EPA, I recommend that you look at the historically accurate lighting program in Yellowstone National Park. It has recreated historic lights and made them all non-light polluting. Its goals would be good to incorporate into your program and to help spread the awareness of this issue further into EPA. A good contact would be Chad Moore of the NPS is a good contact

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By: ChaseR http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/08/greening-history/#comment-15056 Wed, 02 Sep 2009 19:34:38 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1038#comment-15056 It was a pleasure to read Greening History and see that the EPA is furthering information regarding Monticello and Lincoln’s Cottage. You may also be interested in a NYC Landmark, the Schermerhorn Building which is now home to the Audubon Society. It became the 1st green building in NYC.

I have a Greek Revival farmhouse from the anti rent war period. When I bought it contractors were always advising me to level it (tear it down.) After years of experience I realized that was what most people do. Something that never entered my mind. On the property was also an incredibly magnificent Round Barn. A 72 ft. diameter, three story high hemlock structure circa 1900.

There is a lot of history inside these buildings, big or small. Like they say “if the walls could talk,” fortunately some of these old elephants find people to talk for them.

Michael Bailey, you may want to become a member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. They are an unlimited resource. If you can obtain their magazine July/August issue and read Richard Moe’s president’s note, also May/June issue

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By: Michael E. Bailey http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/08/greening-history/#comment-15055 Wed, 12 Aug 2009 04:19:29 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=1038#comment-15055 Making historic sites more energy efficient and environmentally friendly is something I never knew was possible until now. I didn’t know you could do those things without having to change the historic building to such an extent that it would lose its historical significance, so this is great and sounds like its cutting edge. I know some of the things mentioned like the green roof and the recycling air conditioning exhaust to help cool a building and save power are being done today on newer buildings. Several months ago The Orange County Solid Waste Management District opened a new administrative building at the south Orange County landfill that does have a green roof, is powered from the landfill gas, and uses recycled water for all the landscaping. Best wishes, Michael E. Bailey.

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