Comments on: Question of the Week: What branch of science do you find most interesting? http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/ The EPA Blog Mon, 14 Dec 2015 16:24:21 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Reymond B. Desacula http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13224 Sat, 22 Jun 2013 10:50:15 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13224 please help me to do my project about the most important topic about branch of science. I want to do my term paper easily. one branch only, one branch which very easy to find in researching or in the book. Thank you.

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By: Ryan Frechette http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13223 Mon, 29 Mar 2010 13:37:39 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13223 All caps does not equal importance.

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By: John P E Curtin http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13222 Thu, 04 Feb 2010 00:37:17 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13222 Planetary science seems to link all of the other sciences together. When the Kepler mission releases its latest discoveries we will have discovered more than 600 extrasolar planets. For the 21st century Planetary science will develop using as its basis all the other sciences and all of them will contribute to our discoveries in the other ones. Planetary Science seems to be , by necessity , the most inclusive of all the sciences. In the past each of the other sciences have had many practitioners that have maintained that their science is the best of all sciences and that this other science isn’t really a science but Planetary Science could not do that without falling apart. Therefore Planetary science is the most interesting and its practitioners are the most modest.

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By: Dana Patterson http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13221 Mon, 18 May 2009 14:11:52 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13221 I find chemistry the most intriguing of all the sciences. Chemistry explains the origins and details of life. Of course all the sciences are interconnected, which makes ‘science’ in general facinating. In a shift towards a sustainable world, “green chemistry” will be of upmost importance. The way we produce materials through reactions and catalysts is in dire need of a makeover. Mass production and the results of the industrial revolution are smacking us in the face and leaving a giant handprint. Through green chemistry, we are slowly creating new processes that generate less waste, recycle the leftovers, and use renewable resources. The future lies in the hands of the young scientists with creative, innovative ideas.

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By: Emilio Malaguti http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13220 Mon, 18 May 2009 12:57:48 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13220 As many replied, Chemistry is my preferred science, not only because is the one I am in contact with for the past 25 years, but also because is present since the starting of time with the broth of life.

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By: leo http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13219 Mon, 18 May 2009 01:22:46 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13219 I do not know if EPA could be classed with the word nazis, but I do know that they do not want permanent solutions for the superfund program or correct many of they problems associated with hazardous waste materials. I do have the proof to back up what I have said for both this administration and the last administration. I also have the proof that they do not care about science that is presented to them. I would ask that you check your impaired water list where you live and also look at the nearest superfund to you and then look at the law in the cfr that congress passed that EPA is suppose to be following. Make sure you check the second step of the nine step process that CERCLA clearly states what they (EPA) is suppose to be following at superfund sites, capping and deed restrictions do not qualify in the cercla laws, nor are they permanent

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By: Patricia http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13218 Sun, 17 May 2009 19:54:53 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13218 Bioethics…so fascinating…so many issues…and no easy answers!

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By: azrider http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13217 Sun, 17 May 2009 17:48:38 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13217 All science is imporant. We would still be in the Dark Ages without it, and the battle continues even after 2,00 yr’s with “Belief” trying to debunk it all. Thank’s to the brave men & women who broke through with life saving knowledge at the risk of their own life. We must now use all branches of Science to get this little blue planet back on tract before We totally destroy it..Praying ain’t going to do it..Now Faith, that’s a different matter.

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By: PEG BITTNER http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13216 Sun, 17 May 2009 16:37:14 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13216 I HAVE FOUND ASTRONOMY THE MOST INTERESTING SCIENCE EVER SINCE I WAS A CHILD. I HAVE HAD A FASCINTION OF OUTER SPACE AND WHAT IS BEYOND FOR 50 YEARS. I HAVE HAD THE SAME EXCITEMENT AND CONCERN FOR EACH SPACE LAUNCH AND ANTICIIPATION FOR A NEW DISCOVERY WITH EACH ONE. WHEN WE LANDED ON THE MOON AND IT WAS BROADCASTED IT WAS THE GREATEST DAY I HAD EVER LIVED. BUT NOW WITH THE HUBBLE TELESCOPE AND ASTRONAUTS ABLE TO TAKE WALKS INTO SPACE WITHOUT BEING TETHERED THE GREATEST DAY IS YET TO COME. WHO KNOWS WHERE SPACE EXPLORATION WILL TAKE US AND I AM HERE FOR THE RIDE. IT IS UTTERLY AMAZING WHAT IS OUT THERE AND BEYOND AND WE ARE GOING TO FIND OUT

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By: Craig Conant http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2009/05/qotw-what-branch-of-science/#comment-13215 Fri, 15 May 2009 20:29:48 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=839#comment-13215 I agree that chemistry is the most interesting science. It is either at the root of many other disciplines, or is so fundamental to them that they cannot be understood properly without taking chemistry into account. Even in bonehead astronomy classes you learn that the universe has a chemistry – each element emits a different spectographic imprint. Biology can’t be understood without first understanding the chemistry of DNA and RNA. You can’t understand why bone material disintegrates in some soils while papyrus remains relatively intact in others without understanding soil chemistry – meaning you can’t even do archaeology properly without some knowledge of chemistry. And don’t get me started on nuclear physics – it’s chemistry at the level of particles and subparticles.

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