Comments on: Green Things Come in Large Packages http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/ The EPA Blog Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:52:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 By: Daniel Stevens http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/#comment-9211 Thu, 13 Aug 2009 02:05:22 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=271#comment-9211 Great to see more of these battery powered lawn mowers. Although battery powered lawn mowers can cost more then a standard gas-powered mower they really do save money overtime! So easy to maintain as well 😀

Daniel Stevens

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By: ooglek http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/#comment-9210 Mon, 29 Jun 2009 16:18:15 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=271#comment-9210 Lonn —

At 6.1lbs per gallon of gasoline, 80 lbs of gas represents about 13 gallons of gas per year. Since oxygen isn’t actually in the gasoline and is required for combustion, the carbon emissions PLUS the oxygen in the air used to make CO2 cause the weight to be 3 times the weight of the carbon emitted from the gasoline source. And remember that oxygen is further down the periodic table, and thus weighs more, and there are two of them per single atom of carbon.

If you only buy 2 gallons per year, you must have almost NO lawn, or simply never mow, or have some sort of futuristic lawn mower that cost you an arm and a leg and a bar of gold but only uses 2oz of gas per hour.

My experience is about 1 gallon per hour of mowing, and depending on how fast you mow, even a smallish lawn can take a while, depending on how wide your mowing deck is. At 6 months of mowing per year (at least here outside of DC), that’s 26 weeks, and assuming a gallon per week at 6.1lbs per gallon, that’s 158.6 lbs of gas, easily generating the 90lbs of CO2 emissions, especially since the combustion in a mower engine is likely much less inefficient than your car, and has no catalytic converter. Even at half that amount of gas, since only 27% of CO2 emissions by weight is actually carbon from the gas, 79.3 lbs of gas could generate 24.3 lbs of carbon emissions to make up 90 lbs of CO2.

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By: Lonn Maier http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/#comment-9209 Thu, 02 Apr 2009 14:13:28 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=271#comment-9209 I’d like to know where you derive your numbers. With a gas to air mixture of 12:1, a person would have to use 80 pounds of gas per year, assuming all the gas became CO2, which it doesn’t. I buy about 2 gallons per year of gas. Unless you have studies to back the contention, it’s hard to believe.

Thanks–

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By: Jorge http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/#comment-9208 Wed, 27 Aug 2008 14:25:08 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=271#comment-9208 Does the electricity to recharge it come from a fossil fuel plant?

Personally, to reduce global warming and CO2 emissions I hold my breath. In fact, I have not exhaled for 2 years now.

furthermore, I have given up eating ruffage as flatulence emits too much Methane gas and that is 100 times more “greenhouse potent” than CO2.

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By: Brenda http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2008/08/green-things-come-in-large-packages/#comment-9207 Wed, 06 Aug 2008 18:30:38 +0000 http://blog.epa.gov/blog/?p=271#comment-9207 It looks awsome! We don’t realize how much we contribute to global warming through the use of such smaller equipment. I’m dying to know where did you get it?

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