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Water Snake Programming: A simple technical report

2013 September 19

By Casey J. McLaughlin

Sometimes GIS development is about making maps easier for other people.  ArcGIS’s Python Add-ins functionality is a really easy way of automating map tasks and making mapping easier for end-users.  My first add-in was really simple but also reminded me why I’m only a part-time programmer…..

Python.org

Python.org

Many years ago I built a map document for helping TMDL permit reviewers see what was going on in the watershed.  Users work in a database and when ready, open a document that displays the watershed.  There are 147 HUCs approximating watersheds in Region 7.  I wrote a VBA script that fires when the document is opened which goes and grabs the HUC_ID from a database generated text file.  The script then sets the definition query and zooms to the HUC.  When the map opens, the user can start working right in the area of interest.  It’s a fairly simple routine that saves users from a few simple steps.

All good things require updates and this summer the application needed a minor update – of course we also added 50+ data layers so maybe it wasn’t minor!  Besides data, the script I wrote 5+ years ago also needed revision, especially because ArcGIS has discontinued support for VBA.

Yes, ArcGIS Desktop 10 does support Microsoft VBA. However ArcGIS 10 is the last version with VBA support, so we encourage you to start the migration process.  Python is an integral part of ArcGIS Desktop for automating tasks and the new add-in capabilities allow developers to easily create and deploy ArcMap customizations

ESRI recommends migrating VBA code to Python.  I think this is fantastic – Python is an open source, easy to learn, widely supported, multi-use, and generally fun language.  When I first started writing Python, I spent an hour writing a program that had taken me a week in VBA (maybe a slight exaggeration but back then I felt programming in VBA was like getting turned into a newt…and yes, I got better).

ArcGIS now supports a really easy interface for creating Python add-ins.  The new method is really easy but I haven’t been programming in ArcGIS for awhile so I watched the 60 minute training video and immediately started programming (yes, I read the docs, honestly).   The program I wrote performs the same function; when opening a TMDL document, find the HUC_ID and zoom to it.

The python script:

 def openDocument(self)
 mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(“current”)
 mxd_name = os.path.splitext(os.path.basename(mxd.filePath))[0]
 ##Only try this if it is a TMDL document or in the TMDL directory
 if mxd_name.find("TMDL") == 0:
 #Open the IFO file and parse out the HUC ID
 ifo = mxd.filePath.rstrip(mxd.filePath[-3:]).upper() + "ifo"
 #check if it exists and then parse it out
 openFile = open(ifo, 'r')
 huc = openFile.readline().split(",")[2] ## Grabs the 3rd comma delimited element from the 1st line
 df = mxd.activeDataFrame
 lyr = arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd, "8 Digit HUC", df)[0] ## Should look at source?
 lyr.definitionQuery = u"HUC_ID ='" + huc.strip() + "'"
 recordCount = len(arcpy.Describe(lyr).fidset.split(";")) ##Get number of features, if it is 1, zoom, otherwise it should error
 if recordCount == 1:
 df.extent = lyr.getExtent()
 arcpy.RefreshActiveView()
 else:
 pythonaddins.MessageBox(lyr.name + " found " + str(recordCount) + " records for HUC " + str(huc) ,"Error Selecting HUC", 0)
return

I was happy because I tested the script in the Python window in ArcGIS and it worked! I could make the startUp() function fire, but since none of the data was loaded, my function needed to be in openDocument(). Again, smooth sailing until I realized I couldn’t make the openDocument() function fire….or any function that wasn’t the startUp()! I didn’t find anything helpful during an internet search so I took a walk around the lake and a simple thought occurred to me about extensions. They need to be clicked ON to work! This was my gotcha moment – that time when I realized one little detail that I had overlooked.

I’m all done writing my extension and it works well-enough (suggestions are welcome). Now the users can zoom directly to their area of interest. Of course, I think it’d work better as a web map, but I’ll leave that for a future request, perhaps in 5 more years.

TMDL_EXAMPLE_APPLICATION

Casey McLaughlin is a first generation Geospatial Enthusiast who has worked with EPA since 2003 as a contractor and now as the Regional GIS Lead. He currently holds the rank of #1 GISer in EPA Region 7′s Environmental Services Division.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Visualizing Time Series E.Coli in the Blue River Watershed

2013 September 16

By Scott Malone

Previously I provided a glimpse into the world of data management and the various challenges associated with formatting and managing geospatial data. After explaining the process of data management and customization in my last post, let’s review my experience with creating a time series animation.

KCWaterBug Main Legend

KCWaterBug Main Legend

My animation, as I mentioned previously  started with data.  I used the modeled E Coli measurements as an overall indicator of each site’s water quality.  Remember that modeled E Coli readings occur every fifteen minutes and I used a four month time period which meant more than 700,000 readings all together!   Attempting to symbolize every reading within the animation would have been a classic case of too much information. With this in mind, I decided to use the daily maximum value of the modeled E Coli readings cutting down the volume of the data while still maintaining a representative of the daily water quality. Visualizing one value per day made the most sense for my time series animation and the observer’s sanity. To distinguish the varying states of water quality I used threshold values pulled from the Water Bug mobile application offered through KCwaters.org as a template.

 You can find out more about Kansas City water quality and how
the KCWaterBug mobile app keeps the public informed here.

 As a background for the time series animation I used a land cover map (2006 NLCD)  in hopes of generally linking the extent of an areas development to stream water quality. Looking at the animation, you can clearly see the stream located almost fully in the heart of the urban core, Brush Creek, has some serious water quality issues.  The two telemetry sites on the stream change from red to yellow only once over the four month time span of the animation. In no way is this a definitive statement about the link between urban development and water quality however it is interesting to note that  streams considered “fringe urban streams” located in less developed areas such as Wolf Creek have a much more diverse range of water quality classifications during the same time period.

 There is more to water quality than rain storms and E. Coli.
Find out about PAHs in Kansas City streams here.

Another interesting trend visible in the time series animation is how E Coli levels follow precipitation events. Using precipitation data from StormWatch.com a Johnson County, Kansas regional weather service I was able to compare date precipitation events with the modeled E Coli. After a rainfall of an inch or so, modeled E Coli levels elevate, often into the red zone indicating a stream with waters unfit for contact (see fig. 1). Within a day or two most of the streams readings return to a safer level. All this is to say it would be safest to give a stream a couple of days after a heavy rainfall before swimming.

 

KCWater Stream Monitors

The stream monitors advise no water contact after a rain event.

Constructing a visually appealing and informative time series animation while not near as trying as the data management side of the project was not without its challenges. All of the classic challenges of constructing a static map combined with the unique trials a time series animation presents made this project a very interesting endeavor. Managing and properly formatting a massive amount of time sensitive data while presenting an understandable and informative final product was a complicated yet rewarding experience. However my course work up to this point was more useful in addressing the problems that arose relating to cartography and typical GIS quirks, as opposed to the data management side of the project which was eye opening.

As I began my internship here at the EPA’s Region 7 I considered myself a competent GIS user during my time here I was exposed to a wide range of “Information” issues that made me if only for a second question that assumption. However as I wrap up this experience I can say with confidence that I have a deeper understanding of the intricacies of data management and map construction. Working on a project intended to provide the public with a greater understanding of water quality issues on a local level was rewarding in its own right on top of which the experience and knowledge I gained will help me as I move forward toward a career. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Casey McLaughlin and all the fine folks here at region 7 for their help this summer and suggest that you take a look at the fruit of my labor.

Scott Malone recently graduated from the University of Kansas with a degree in Environmental Studies.  He spent part of summer 2012 as a voluntary intern with the Environmental Services Division where he worked with LiDAR, land cover, and water quality telemetry data.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

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Flat Stella and Stanley’s Trip Down Old Man River

2013 September 10

Last month Stanley and Stella took a trip on the middle part of the Mighty Mississippi from St. Louis, Missouri to Cairo, Illinois.  Here is a picture of Stanley getting on board and preparing for their trip down river.  Keep an eye out for their adventure in the coming weeks.  And don’t forget to check out Stanley and Stella Explore the Environment, their very own blog.

stanley

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Ozark Gems

2013 September 9

By Tegan Vaughn

Are you still deciding whether or not to take a trip before the summer is over? There is no need to spend a lot or travel far to have a fabulous weekend getaway. I highly recommend exploring the Ozarks.

I grew up in the heart of the Ozarks, on a tributary to the Jacks Fork River.  To some folks, when I say I grew up in the Ozarks, their minds automatically go to party boats and Branson. Well, the places my mind wanders to when I think of home are the lush, green hills; the cool, clear streams; and the shade of towering Oaks. To me, an adventure in the Ozarks is worth 10 visits to any amusement park. Let me tell you about a few gems.

 

Photo Courtesy of Missouri State Parks

Photo Courtesy of Missouri State Parks

Speaking of adventure parks, the Ozarks has one carved by nature.  Johnson’s Shut-ins State Park is located in Reynolds County on the East Fork of the Black River. Water rushes over igneous rock that’s been smoothed by tumbling pebbles over the eons.  The Missouri State Park websites tempts potential travelers to come “shoot through Mother Nature’s hydraulics.” But not to worry, I can tell you from experience that it’s relatively safe.

 

Photo Courtesy of Missouri State Parks

Photo Courtesy of Missouri State Parks

Next on the list, and nearby to Johnson’s Shut-ins, is Elephant Rocks State Park. Here you’ll find large, reddish-pink granite boulders that resemble Dumbo. This park has a main trail that includes Braille for the visually impaired and many other places to explore if you want to get off the beaten path.

 

grandgulf

Photo Courtesy of Missouri State Parks

Grand Gulf State Park–Sometimes referred to as a “little Grand Canyon,” Grand Gulf is a mile long collapsed dolomite cave near Thayer, Missouri. The “walls” are more than 130 feet tall. Visitors at the top have quite the dramatic view.  When it rains, water drains into a cave at one end of Grand Gulf and ends up in Mammoth Springs, headwaters of Arkansas’ Spring River. http://www.mostateparks.com/park/grand-gulf-state-park

alleyspring

Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

 Alley Spring – This charming three story mill was built in 1894 to utilize the free water power of Alley spring to turn wheat to flour. The water is an incredible blue green and emerges from deep in the earth with an average daily flow of 81 million gallons. Water from the spring flows to the Jacks Fork River.

 

roundspring

Photo is courtesy of www.current-river.com

Round Spring – This beautiful spring reminds me of a cenote. It is a brilliant turquoise blue. Every day, about 26 million gallons of water comes up from the earth (55 feet down from the surface of the pool), then flows under a natural bridge and out to the current river. Near the spring is Round Spring cave.  This cave is home to a bat maternity colony and beautiful cave formations. The cave is gated, but in the past, cave tours have been available in the summer months.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of www.ruralmissouri.org

Photo Courtesy of www.ruralmissouri.org

Rocky Falls – This dramatic destination is located near Eminence and Winona, Missouri.  The 40 ft. falls are made up of rhyolite, a reddish-purple igneous rock. Rocky Creek cuts its way through the rock and creates a rippling, merry cascade that falls down to a great swimming hole.

There is nothing like visiting the breathtaking places right in our back yard. Their beauty reminds me of why we at the EPA and our Federal, State, and local partners work hard to protect and preserve these treasures. I live in Kansas City now, but my heart will always live in the Ozark hills.

Tegan Vaughn has worked at EPA Region 7 for three years in the Policy and Management Division. She graduated from UMKC with a BA in Environmental Studies and Minors in Geography and Sustainability. She currently resides in Olathe, KS.

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Environmental Impact Statements Are on the Map!

2013 September 5

By Aimee Hessert

Do you ever wonder how a proposed project will affect the environment where you and your family live, work and play? We’re making it easier to find out. We’ve developed a simple, interactive map to help you learn about environmental impact statements in your area.

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires federal agencies proposing major projects or making decisions on major federal actions to develop environmental impact statements (EIS), which describe the potential environmental effects (both good and bad) of proposed projects that require federal approval, or other federal actions. The idea is to give you a view into, and a voice in, the federal agency decision-making process.

The map allows you to see what projects have EISs that are currently open for public review and comment, while also viewing EPA’s comments. Now it’s easier for local residents to access valuable information, stay informed and get involved, right at their fingertips.

Take a few minutes to check out the EIS Mapper. All you need to do is hover your mouse over your home state for easy-to-understand information about projects that may affect you. From there, you can review each project’s environmental impact statement and find out how to share your thoughts while the comment period is open.

In this information technology age, transparency empowers progress. Stay informed and get involved.

Check out EPA’s EIS Mapper here: http://eismapper.epa.gov.

EPA's Environmental Impact Statements by State Mapper

EPA’s Environmental Impact Statements by State Mapper

 

Aimee Hessert is the Deputy Director of EPA’s NEPA Compliance Division.  She has worked on GIS and IT initiatives for EPA’s NEPA program since 2004.

Learn More!:  The web-based mapping tool, NEPAssist is designed to help promote collaboration and early involvement in the NEPA process by allowing the user to raise and identify important environmental issues at the earliest stages of project development.  Read the full blog post here.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Maps Begin with Data

2013 August 28

By Scott Malone

This summer, I worked with the Environmental Protection Agency, in Lenexa Kansas as a voluntary intern.  I learned that making a time-series map takes more than just getting data and putting it into ArcGIS.  For my summer project, I created a time-series animation of water quality trends using data from the Kansas City Urban Stream Network.

KCwaterbug LogoHosted at KCWaters.org, the project is “dedicated to promoting greater awareness about the quality of water in the Greater Kansas City Area.”  Using data acquired every 15 minutes over a 4 month time period (March 1st through July 10th, 2013) I created an animation showing water quality trends over our wet spring and early summer months.  The process of constructing a visually informative and appealing animation from raw data was full of challenges.  Unlike the canned projects I was accustomed to from my GIS courses in college, this project involved a significant amount of data manipulation before I was able to ever open up an Arcmap project and begin map-making.

Track stream conditions hourly using KCWaterbug.  Find out more.

sondeThe Urban Stream Network consists of eighteen sites spaced across sixteen streams in the Kansas City metro area.  Each site consists of a stream probe and telemetry box which collects readings on water temperature, conductivity, turbidity, and water depth. The readings are transmitted via satellite and compiled into a database using software called WISKI from a company named KISTERSE Coli data is modeled for each stream (you can find out more at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5014/) based on other variables collected by instrumentation.  With readings done every fifteen minutes over four months, I worked with an initial dataset of over 700,000 records grouped by station by each parameter all wrapped into one fun text file.  I definitely experienced the joys of taking data and running through multiple processing steps before enjoying the fruits of my labor in a GIS friendly database.

 

telemtry_table

Not quite formatted for ArcGIS

First, I removed the header information (station name, number, other identifiers) provided for each parameter and converted it into a spreadsheet friendly format.  I painstakingly created a spread sheet for each stream (16, remember), transposed data, added stream names, and added parameter names.  With over 40,000 records for each stream (16, remember) the process was time consuming.  Unfortunately such data processing can become necessary when working from data extracted for purpose different than my own.  Once each stream was standardized, I combined them back together into a GIS usable table.

Adding time, or rather converting time, was another detail that I learned wasn’t always simple.  Of course, creating a time-series map necessitates time stamps that ArcGIS can use for creating a time-aware dataset.

After running through this data manipulation exercise, I now have a much greater understanding of data management.  I completely value having data in databases and extracting it out for an intended purpose.  I also appreciate that the *I* in GIS is there for a very important reason!  My next post will review how I took the telemetry data and started looking for interesting and useful trends.

Scott Malone is a graduate from the University of Kansas with a degree in Environmental Studies.  He spent part of summer 2012 as a voluntary intern with the Environmental Services Division where he worked with LiDAR, land cover, and water quality telemetry data.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Biking for Sustainability

2013 August 20

By Shannon Bond

GT_Banner

I strap on my helmet, slip into my gloves, and sling my hydration pack across my shoulders. It’s time to find adventure. I swing my leg over the saddle and click my right shoe into the peddle. A lot of the time I find my adventure on the back of a mountain bike, flying down all of the single track dirt trails I can find. Rocky climbs, fast descents, quick and flowing terrain, it’s all meditative.

I’ve ridden for years, but since coming to the EPA a few thoughts have lodged themselves into my consciousness. One of those thoughts creeps into my mind on every ride; as my muscles are screaming and I’m focusing on, well, my focus, I think about sustainability.

Merriam-Webster defines sustainable as, “of, relating to, or being a method of harvesting or using a resource so that the resource is not depleted or permanently damaged.” (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sustainable)

Trails and parks are a perfect example of sustainability. They not only provide a refuge for wildlife, they also provide a refuge for people. These areas work well as an escape from the daily barrage of work and technology, a personal connection with nature, or a great way to exercise. Sustainability isn’t just about our physical environment, though; it’s about us, too. On the EPA website, it describes sustainability in the following way:

“Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations.” (http://www.epa.gov/sustainability/)

I would say that these trail systems definitely promote that productive harmony, as well as fulfill some of our social needs. I’ve come to understand that these trails don’t happen by themselves though. Parks don’t just sprout up for people to hike and explore, and bike-friendly urban environments don’t just happen, they are built. A lot of planning goes into public use areas, and a lot of maintenance is required to keep them going.

You don’t generally think about Kansas City and biking, especially mountain biking, but the scene has grown. It’s an exciting time for the bike community in Kansas City. According to the Earth Riders Trail Association (http://www.earthriders.org/) we have at least thirteen maintained trail systems in the K.C. metro area. I know from talking to some of these dedicated individuals that there are even more planned.

 

ERTA Trails

Now that I realize what it takes to maintain these trails, I appreciate them even more, and the folks who get out and work on them. Initially, there has to be an agreement with the land owners. Those owners can be county, federal, or state. Then it takes coordination with the land managers to plan the trail system in an environmentally-sustainable way. After that, a host of volunteers spend countless hours on trail work days. Even after the trails are built, those work days keep coming. All of this behind-the-scenes work is hidden from the everyday user. To lend a hand, though, you can check the group’s websites and pick any number of maintenance days to show up at:

http://earthriders.com
http://www.earnyourdirt.org/
http://www.kansascyclist.com/links/TrailMasonsAssociation.html
http://www.kansascyclist.com/

 

Shannon Bond  is a multimedia production specialist with EPA Region 7’s Office of Public Affairs. He has served in a host of roles including military policeman, corrections officer, network operations specialist, photojournalist, broadcast specialist and public affairs superintendant.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Cultivate KC

2013 August 6

By Holly Mehl

cultivatekc

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to create maps for a project I felt proud to help out with, the Urban Grown Farms and Gardens Tour in Kansas City.  Every other June, Cultivate Kansas City hosts the tour, which showcases urban agriculture across the metro area via a full week of events. The organization’s mission is to be “a catalyst for the production and consumption of locally grown food in Kansas City neighborhoods.”   This year’s event was the fifth biennial tour. Every tour has gotten better and every time more farms have joined in, showing a refreshing, tasty and sustainable trend happening in our area.

Cultivate Kansas City’s website is colorful and informative and is a feast for the visual senses, as you will see by going here.

Part of Cultivate Kansas City’s vision is to turn unused spaces into food producing farms and gardens, which not only provide sustainable, community engaged places to buy healthy food, but also beautifies neighborhoods by often redeveloping blighted areas.  This is something I can get behind and I’ve already recommended that my church’s garden – from which vegetables are donated to local pantries – become a part of the tour in 2015.

EPA actively promotes Urban agriculture as part of our Brownfields program.  Urban agriculture projects can help bind contaminants while providing further benefits to the property and surrounding community. An urban farm or community garden can improve the environment, reduce greenhouse emissions, and improve access to healthy, locally grown food. Other possible benefits include promoting health and physical activity, increasing community connections, and attracting economic activity.  You can check out more by visiting EPA’s website, read our Interim Guidelines for Safe Gardening Practices.

The tour maps are no longer posted on the website since the tour is now over, but synopses and pictures of the tour’s farms and gardens are still highlighted there, as is a little video that uses the tour’s primary map as background.

Below is the map handed out to tour participants who arrived at any of the hub locations to buy tour tickets.  Nearly 60 farms and gardens on the tour are shown in four different geographic areas called Veggie Zones.  The vegetable symbols on the map represent the farm/garden locations.

This was a fun map to make, but even more fun was visiting these vibrant, beautiful places (run by vibrant and beautiful people), all of which help to make Kansas City’s future much more promising for all of us.

cultivatekcmap

About the Author: Holly Mehl is an ecologist for EPA Region 7 who helps with water monitoring in the field and performs mapping for EPA Region 7’s program offices when in the office.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Thanks Rich

2013 July 19

By Jeffery Robichaud

If you are like me, you often get so busy you sometimes overlook thanking folks at work. I’m not talking about the day-to-day thanks but the big heartfelt, “no particular thing” thanks.   These thank-yous seem to generally occur at retirement and going away parties, so I wanted to make sure that I got a chance to thank someone before he leaves (even if it is only a couple weeks before).

Rich Hood serves as EPA Region 7’s Associate Administrator for Media and Intergovernmental Relations, and has worked with EPA for nine years, the last six in Kansas City.  His journalism career spans more than 30 years with over 15 years in government public affairs, and he will be leaving us at the end of the month to join the ranks of the newly retired.

I’ve worked with Rich on all manner of activities throughout the years, from public meetings and presentations, to visits from Administrators, and press releases.  I remember one of my first interactions with Rich was working with Casey to pitch the idea of News Where you Live, an approach to providing citizens a simple and easy way to view their news geospatially.  He fully supported moving forward with our idea rather than waiting for the Agency to devise a similar approach. He felt it was important for EPA Region 7 to tell its story of accomplishments to the public we serve in as transparent and accessible manner as we could.

newswhereyou live

Rich was also there for the launch of KCWaterBug and helped us to spread the word throughout the Kansas City metro area.  In fact we have been successful over the years in making sure we place information in the hands of the public to inform them of issues and concerns that are important for them to know, whether air quality on ozone alert days, emergencies, or even plain old good news.

 

Rich was the one who encouraged me to write as one of the two Region 7 bloggers of EPA’s original Greenversations  back in 2008 (we have subsequently switched from wind to solar).  His edits always added clarity and a level of succinctness which my writing generally lacks (I’m a bit of a meanderer as you can tell).  Although my contributions to Greenversations tapered off over the years, he again supported the efforts of Casey and me to launch the Big Blue Thread a little less than a year ago.  It was also gracious that he allowed us to write our blog using a geospatial lens and include both general science posts and highly technical GIS-related posts.

Rich and his deputy, Hattie Thomas, have assembled a fantastic team over the past few years and I look forward to continuing my work with them to “publish” the Big Blue Thread.  I’m sure Rich will be quite happy to pass his red pen to someone else and rid himself of my alliteration and bad puns.  Thank you, Rich! Spend your retirement reading the news instead of making it, and if you need a map, give Casey or me a call.

rich

Jeffery Robichaud  is a second generation EPA scientist who has worked for the Agency since 1998. He currently serves as Deputy Director of EPA Region 7′s Environmental Services Division.

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.

Flat Stanley and Stella Visit Kansas City!

2013 July 12

Blog_Stanley-Stella_dec2012-2

flatstanleystellar7

Here they are visiting EPA Region 7′s Headquarters in Lenexa, KS.  Be sure your children become part of their adventure by visiting the Stanley and Stella Explore the Environment Blog.

 

 

Editor's Note: The opinions expressed here are those of the author. They do not reflect EPA policy, endorsement, or action, and EPA does not verify the accuracy or science of the contents of the blog.

Please share this post. However, please don't change the title or the content. If you do make changes, don't attribute the edited title or content to EPA or the author.